NASCAR delivers 2014 rules package to Cup teams

4 Comments

Following last week’s Sprint Cup test session at Charlotte Motor Speedway (pictured), NASCAR has announced the delivery of its 2014 competition package to Cup teams.

The new package will not be utilized in restrictor-plate races such as the season-opening Daytona 500 on Feb. 23, 2014. It will make its official debut on March 2, 2014 at the one-mile Phoenix International Raceway.

Major changes involved with the new package include:

  • Statically set car at race ride height, eliminating pre- and post-race front height rules and inspection.
  • The use of a front splitter with a square leading edge.
  • Skirts at 4-inch minimum ground clearance on both the right and left sides.
  • Rear fascia trimmed 1.375 inches higher in current scallop region.
  • The use of an 8-inch high rear spoiler.
  • The use of a 43-inch wide by 13-inch long radiator pan.

“It was important to get the final pieces of the rules package to teams as quickly as possible following the final tests last week,” NASCAR VP of innovation and racing development Gene Stefanyshyn said in a statement.

“Throughout the process, we gained valuable data that informed many of the changes for 2014. This data will prove useful as we continue to evolve the racing product into the future.”

This past year’s debut of the Generation 6 cars for the Sprint Cup Series wasn’t an altogether triumphant one, with the racing product often lacking at many of the series’ 1.5-mile ovals.

Twice this fall at Charlotte, NASCAR tested a variety of potential aero configurations to try and solve the problem. In last week’s aforementioned test, a series of simulated races were held to see how those configurations worked with a bigger group of cars.

“We looked at a number of important factors when finalizing what the 2014 version of the race package will look like,” Stefanyshyn continued.

“The Gen-6 car has been a great asset to our sport. As we continue to improve and develop the racing product, we’ll rely significantly on the critical data that has been generated by the entire industry over the last several weeks. We’re extremely appreciative of those efforts.”

F1 2017 driver review: Lewis Hamilton

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Following on from the driver reviews from the Verizon IndyCar Series, MotorSportsTalk kicks off its Formula 1 recaps by looking back on Lewis Hamilton’s championship year.

Lewis Hamilton

Team: Mercedes AMG Petronas
Car No.: 44
Races: 20
Wins: 9
Podiums (excluding wins): 4
Pole Positions: 11
Fastest Laps: 7
Points: 363
Laps Led: 527
Championship Position: 1st

Lewis Hamilton may have wrapped up his fourth Formula 1 world title with two races to spare, but his margin of victory was far from representative of what was arguably his greatest championship victory yet.

Mercedes entered 2017 bidding to become the first team to defend its titles across a seismic regulation change, and appeared to be on the back foot early on after Ferrari impressed in pre-season testing and won the opening race through Sebastian Vettel.

Hamilton was left wrestling with a “diva” of a car, as coined by Mercedes team boss Toto Wolff, but was able to get on top of it by the second race of the year in China, taking a dominant win in wet-dry conditions.

The win was representative of Hamilton’s form through the first portion of the season. When he won, he won in style – as in Spain, Canada and on home soil in Great Britain – but the off weekends saw him struggle.

Heading into the summer break, Vettel’s championship lead stood at 14 points, with the pair’s on-track rivalry having already spilled over in Baku when they made contact behind the safety car.

But Hamilton then produced the form that propelled him to titles in 2014 and 2015, breaking the back of the season through the final flyaways. As Vettel and Ferrari capitulated over the Asian rounds, picking up just 12 points when a full score of 75 for three wins was certainly in reach, Hamilton capitalised and put himself on the brink of the title.

While Hamilton’s run to P9 in Mexico was a messy way to wrap up his hardest-fought title to date, getting across the line and the job done was a significant result.

Unlike his last two titles, Hamilton was tasked with an enemy outside of the team in this title race and a car that arguably wasn’t the fastest on the grid.

But his unquestionable talent and ability to dig deep to get himself out of tough situations – Singapore and Brazil being two key examples where the result was far from expected – proved crucial once again.

Hamilton is now in the annals of F1 history as one of its all-time greats. The pole record is his, and only two drivers can boast more world titles than him (Michael Schumacher and Juan Manuel Fangio).

Depending on how long he wants to continue racing, going down as F1’s statistical all-time great is certainly not out of the realm of possibility.

Season High: Charging from the pit lane to P4 in Brazil, a race he could have even won.

Season Low: Dropping out in Q2 in Monaco, only recovering to P7 in the race.