Button not keen on post-F1 career in sports cars

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At 33 years old, former World Champion Jenson Button doesn’t sense the impending end of his Formula One career. But once he does finish his days in F1, he’s hoping to find himself a new challenge.

As for what Button plans to do at that point, we know this much: He won’t be taking a page from ex-Red Bull man Mark Webber’s playbook and head off to sports car racing.

In comments made to Autosport, Button says that while he’d like to drive the famous Circuit de la Sarthe – home of the 24 Hours of Le Mans – in a sports car, he doesn’t want to deal with having to wind his way through the cars of the slower categories during a race.

“Le Mans never really ticked the boxes for me,” he said. “You are racing with cars that are so much slower, in different categories, and dodging cars throughout the whole race is not something that I have ever got that excited about…But each to their own as obviously a lot of people do love it.”

Indeed, one could assume that navigating through the multiple categories in sports car racing can be a patience-sapping exercise for any racer. But perhaps he may change his mind one day – perhaps after taking stock of what Webber does in the World Endurance Championship from this year onward with Porsche?

In any case, there’s still some business to attend to in F1 for Button. He signed a one-year extension this past fall with McLaren, but could be a hot commodity in 2015.

No doubt he can raise his stock if he helps McLaren return to its winning ways after a disastrous 2013 and stays ahead of promising rookie teammate Kevin Magnussen while doing so.

Social roundup: Racing world largely outraged by Verstappen penalty

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The discussion over Max Verstappen’s post-race five-second time penalty assessed in Sunday’s United States Grand Prix, issued when he tried to the inside of Kimi Raikkonen at the Turns 16, 17 and 18 carousel complex at Circuit of The Americas, will roll on far beyond today.

The debate today largely centered over consistency in adjudication and application of the rules, track limits themselves (always a sore subject at COTA given its wide runoff areas) or whether there should be permanent stewards.

In the immediate aftermath, though, Twitter lit up with outrage over Verstappen being assessed a five-second post-race time penalty.

Here’s a mere sampling of the reaction, below.