Ex-Marussia driver Luiz Razia looking at IndyCar seat in 2014?

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Luiz Razia appeared ready to ascend to Formula One last winter but was unable to hold onto his ride at Marussia (pictured) due to sponsorship issues. Now the Brazilian driver may be looking at the IndyCar Series instead.

While also mentioning the DTM touring car series as another possibility, Razia recently told French site SportAuto that he has the agent of former Indianapolis 500 winner and two-time CART champion Gil de Ferran talking to IndyCar teams about a potential program in 2014.

After serving as a test driver for Virgin Racing (now Marussia) in 2010 and Team Lotus (now Caterham) in 2011, Razia finished second in the 2012 GP2 championship and signed with Marussia this past February.

But the aforementioned funding problems forced Marussia to terminate its contract with him, and the team wound up replacing him with Jules Bianchi, who put together a quietly impressive first season despite having little time to get used to the team and its car. With his F1 hopes dashed, Razia kept busy this season in the International GT Open sports car series.

Razia has also taken time to share his two cents on Toro Rosso’s decision to pass over Antonio Felix da Costa in favor of 19-year-old Russian driver Daniil Kvyat for a 2014 race seat in F1.

da Costa has landed a test role with World Champions Red Bull instead, but Razia still believes that da Costa should have gotten the Toro Rosso seat.

“The strange thing is not the fact that [Kvyat] is coming from GP3,” he said to Brazilian publication TotalRace. “A driver can demonstrate his talent in many categories. What I’m saying it that there is a loss of momentum.”

Razia also noted da Costa’s competitiveness in Formula Renault 3.5 this past year; he earned three wins and wound up third in the championship behind winner Kevin Magnussen (who is now preparing for his rookie F1 campaign with McLaren) and Stoffel Vandoorne.

While admitting that he is “the devil’s advocate” as he is a friend of da Costa’s, Razia feels other factors were at play in Kvyat’s promotion such as a need to have a Russian on the grid for the country’s inaugural Grand Prix this coming season at Sochi.

“[F1] is a very political category, and [Kvyat] is even sponsored by a Russian bank,” he said. “Toro Rosso has difficulties, as everyone does, so it was a situation where everything fell into place for him.”

Brown: Dennis would have made same decision on McLaren-Honda split

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Zak Brown believes former McLaren team boss Ron Dennis would have made the same decision to cut ties with struggling Formula 1 engine partner Honda had he still been in charge at the team in 2017.

McLaren executive director Brown helped engineer a deal for the team to split with Honda at the end of the 2017 season after three tough seasons that had seen the Japanese manufacturer offer little in the way of performance or reliability.

The decision split opinion, with McLaren spurning a significant annual financial injection from Honda in order to link up with Renault, believing its on-track fortunes had to be prioritized over its commercial interests.

In an interview with Sky Sports, Brown was asked if he believed Dennis – McLaren’s long-running team chief before stepping down at the end of 2016 – would have made the same decision to cut ties with Honda.

“I think he would have,” Brown said.

“He was here when those conversations were ongoing and I think Ron always has and always will have the best interests of McLaren in his heart.

“He is Mr. McLaren. It burns him inside as much as us not to see us winning races.”

Brown also elaborated on the decision to break off the much-lauded relationship with Honda, saying the first signs of trouble with the 2017 power unit were clear in pre-season.

After a number of attempts to try and rectify the situation, Brown and his fellow team bosses felt there was no alternative but to end the Honda deal for 2018.

“We knew we were in trouble in testing in Barcelona and we worked really hard for six months to try and find solutions that would give us confidence that we’d be much more competitive in 2018,” Brown said.

“Ultimately, after trying many different things and many different ways we felt we couldn’t get there.

“Three years is a long time in Formula 1 and so we needed to change the direction to get our team back at the top.”