The Year in Motors, Part 2: NASCAR and NHRA

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As the off-season has gone by, MotorSportsTalk has produced multiple season reviews in various racing categories. Today marks the second part of our Year in Motors, and with that, here’s a quick rundown of the NASCAR and NHRA seasons.

NASCAR Sprint Cup

A competitive and sometimes controversial season ended with Jimmie Johnson returning to the top of the Sprint Cup Series. The Hendrick Motorsports driver claimed his sixth Cup championship with a ninth-place finish in the season finale at Homestead-Miami Speedway, enabling him to defeat title rival Matt Kenseth by 19 points after their exciting battle throughout the post-season Chase.

The Chase was nearly overshadowed by scandal that took place during the final regular season race of the year in September at Richmond International Raceway. In a bid to help Michael Waltrip Racing teammate Martin Truex Jr. make the Chase, Clint Bowyer intentionally spun out in the final laps at RIR and Brian Vickers went to the pits after the race went back to green.

NASCAR ultimately decided MWR had attempted to manipulate the race and came down hard with penalties that knocked Truex out of the post-season. They then opted to add Jeff Gordon, one of the drivers affected by the Richmond incident, into the Chase as a 13th competitor. Eventually, MWR sponsor NAPA decided to leave the sport, which forced the team to relegate their third car to part-time status and caused Truex to find another ride at Furniture Row Racing.

This year was also notable for the debut of the Generation 6 cars, which were designed to improve racing especially on the intermediate tracks. However, while noticeably quicker than their predecessors, many races in 2013 still came down to track position. After a pair of tests at Charlotte this fall, NASCAR has produced a new aero package for the Gen 6 that’s slated to debut this coming March at Phoenix, the first race after the Daytona 500.

NASCAR Nationwide

Austin Dillon and Sam Hornish Jr. took their fight for the championship all the way to the finish at Homestead, but Dillon ultimately won out by a scant margin of three points over the former Indianapolis 500 winner. The triumph served as a prelude to grandfather/car owner Richard Childress’ announcement that Dillon would bring the iconic No. 3 back to Sprint Cup next season for Richard Childress Racing. As for Hornish, he is currently a free agent at this time.

The NNS also had a spirited race for the owner’s championship between Joe Gibbs Racing’s No. 54 team and Penske Racing’s No. 22 team. Kyle Busch won 12 races for the No. 54, but Penske’s quartet of Brad Keselowski, Joey Logano, A.J. Allmendinger and Ryan Blaney combined for 12 wins of their own – and it was Logano’s sixth-place finish at Homestead that enabled the Penske camp to win that particular title by one point.

Kyle Larson claimed Rookie of the Year honors after starting his NNS campaign with a devastating crash in the season opener at Daytona International Speedway; Larson was sent flying into the catch fence moments after contact was made by Regan Smith and Brad Keselowski while the field scrambled to the checkered flag. Debris from the incident injured more than 30 fans.

NASCAR Camping World Truck

Matt Crafton rode the consistency wave all the way to the CWTS driver’s championship, earning one win and 19 Top-10 finishes across 22 starts. He came up short, however, of giving his ThorSport Racing team the series’ owner’s title after taking late damage at Homestead. That opened the door for Kyle Busch Motorsports to take the owner’s crown after Busch won the race; KBM earned the championship on a tie-breaker with its No. 51 Truck winning seven times in 2013 compared to Crafton’s lone win for the Thorsport No. 88.

Also making a major impact was a bumper crop of young talent. There were five first-time winners in 2013, with Kyle Larson, Darrell Wallace Jr., Jeb Burton, Chase Elliott and Eric Jones all earning their inaugural series wins. And there were other memorable episodes too, from the post-race brouhaha at Canadian Tire Motorsport Park to the first-ever “Mudsummer Classic” on the dirt at Eldora Speedway.

NHRA

The face of the NHRA returned to championship glory in 2013, as John Force claimed his 16th career Funny Car class championship. Also adding another title to their respective mantles were Jeg Coughlin Jr. in Pro Stock (his fifth PS title) and Matt Smith in Pro Stock Motorcycle (his second PSM title). The lone first-time champion was Shawn Langdon, who broke through in Top Fuel after a season that saw him win the NHRA’s signature gathering, the U.S. Nationals.

And in case you missed our first part of the Year in Motors, here’s that as well.

Michael Andretti looking forward to new Australian Supercars venture

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If it seems like Michael Andretti is out to conquer the world, he is – kind of.

The former IndyCar star turned prolific team owner has won three of the last four Indianapolis 500s and five overall, second only to Roger Penske’s 16 Indy 500 triumphs.

Along the way, in addition to expanding his own IndyCar and Indy Lights operation, the son of Mario Andretti and the primary shareholder of Andretti Autosport has also branched out into Global RallyCross and Formula E racing in recent years.

And now, Andretti has further expanded his brand internationally, following Penske to the world down under — as in the world of Australian V8 Supercars.

Andretti has teamed with Supercars team owner Ryan Walkinshaw, along with veteran motorsports marketer and executive director of McLaren Technology Group and United Autosports owner and chairman, Zak Brown.

Together, the three have formed Walkinshaw Andretti United, based in suburban Melbourne, Australia. The new team kicks off the new season with the Adelaide 500 from March 1-4.

“It’s just extending our brand and putting it out there,” Andretti told NBC Sports. “The Supercars are such a great series.

“It all started with Zach Brown calling me and said ‘You have to talk to Ryan Walkinshaw. He’s got something interesting to talk to you about.’

“We talked and literally in like a half-hour, we said, ‘Let’s figure out how we’re going to make this work.’ And then Zack was like, ‘Hey, what about me?’ And then Zack came in as a partner and it’s cool now that we have the Walkinshaw Andretti United team.

“I’m really excited about that program, the guys at the shop are excited about it, we’ve been doing a lot of things to try and help it because it’s such a cool series and the cars are so cool.

“I went down there to Bathurst, which was to me one of the coolest tracks in the world. I wish I could have driven it, I really do. It looks like a blast.

“It’s amazing how big that series is when you go down there. It’s one of the biggest sports in Australia. It was just a great opportunity for us to extend our portfolio.”

Admittedly, Andretti had some extra incentive to want to get involved in the Supercars world: Penske joined forces with legendary Dick Johnson Racing in September 2014.

The organization came together quickly and the rebranded DJR Team Penske went on to win the 2017 V8 Supercars championship.

“Roger was down there the last few years,” Andretti said, adding that fact as incentive to get his own organization into the series. “So it’s cool to go race head-to-head with Roger. That was also in the back of our minds.”

This is no start-up venture for Andretti. The roots of the new venture began in 1990 as the Holden Racing Team, which went on to become one of the most successful organizations in Australian V8 Supercar racing, having won the drivers’ championship six times and the Virgin Australia Supercars Championship’s top race, the Bathurst 1000 (essentially Australia’s version of the Indy 500), seven times.

Last season, Holden Racing team morphed into Triple Eight Race Engineering and was renamed Mobil 1 HSV Racing.

And now the company has been renamed once again for the 2018 campaign under the Walkinshaw Andretti United banner.

The team will be composed of two Holden ZB Commodores with drivers James Courtney and Scott Pye, as well as a Porsche 911 GT3-R in the Australian GT championship.

What’s next for Andretti’s motorsports portfolio? Right now, it’s pretty full, but you can bet running for championships from Australia (Supercars) to globally (GRC) to Indianapolis (Indy 500) to the U.S. (Verizon IndyCar Series) are at the top of this year’s list.