IMSA Sporting Rules released post-Daytona test

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The Roar Before the Rolex 24 test has just concluded from the Daytona International Speedway. We’ll delve into today’s times either later today or tomorrow.

Additionally as the test has ended, IMSA, sanctioning body for the TUDOR United SportsCar Championship, has just released the 2014 sporting rules package. We’ll be able to explain this in full detail later this week. For now, here’s the release as sent out by IMSA:

International Motor Sports Association (IMSA) officials delivered the 2014 sporting rules package to teams participating in the inaugural TUDOR United SportsCar Championship as Roar Before The Rolex 24 testing wrapped up at Daytona International Speedway.

“The final component of the merger between the American Le Mans Series presented by Tequila Patrón and the GRAND-AM Rolex Sports Car Series is now in place,” said Scot Elkins, IMSA vice president, competition and technical regulations. “Bringing together two series, which operated under markedly different rules, was a mammoth undertaking. We took advantage of the opportunity to closely examine the rules and procedures utilized by GRAND-AM and the previous iteration of IMSA to create a package that includes best practices from both.”

The 2014 IMSA Sporting Rules include many of the regulations and procedures announced last summer. Notable items introduced today include:

Points System/Procedures

  • The TUDOR Championship points system will be identical to the one utilized previously in the GRAND-AM Rolex Series, with 35 points for first, 32 for second, 30 for third, 28 for fourth and 26 for fifth. Sixth place is worth 25 points with each subsequent finishing position decreasing by one point.
  • Drivers can be entered to drive a maximum of two cars. Drivers will be eligible for championship points and awards in two different classes from the same race if they complete minimum driving requirements in each and do not exceed the maximum driving time. Drivers entered in two cars in the same class at the same event will only receive points in one of the cars and must declare that car no later than one hour prior to the event’s first official practice session.
  • Drivers must participate in at least one practice, qualifying or warm-up session in every car in which they are nominated. They must complete at least three laps during a scheduled night practice for every event run partly at night in order to drive at night in the race.
  • Any car found out of compliance with the rules may be removed from consideration for prize money and points and other finishers advance accordingly.

Qualifying Procedures

  • Different drivers are eligible to qualify and start the race, similar to the procedure previously used by the ALMS. Starting drivers must be nominated no later than 30 minutes after qualifying ends.
  • Drivers causing a red-flag stoppage during qualifying will lose their fastest timed lap in the session. Drivers involved in incidents that cause qualifying to be abandoned will be placed at the rear of the starting grid.

Race Procedures

  • Cars must remain in position within their starting column until after they cross the starting line after the green flag is displayed. On restarts, overtaking may commence at the display of the green flag.
  • Pits will be closed at the time a full-course caution is announced.
  • If deemed appropriate, the race director shall authorize a pass-around for any car that has its class leader behind it.
  • P and PC cars will be permitted to pit on the first lap after the pits are declared open. Only GTLM and GTD cars are permitted to pit on the subsequent lap. Any car is permitted to pit after the first two class-specific opportunities are concluded.
  • Race control will authorize a Lap Down Wave By for any car behind the safety car that was not on the lead lap at the time of a full-course caution that is ahead of the first car in their class on the lead lap at the time of the full-course caution.
  • The class-specific separation for pit stops and the Lap Down Wave By are not in effect for any safety car period within 15 minutes of a previous green flag – including the race start – or during the final 30 minutes of the race.
  • Cars are not required to take the checkered flag on the race track to be eligible for a finishing position, points or awards.

The 2014 TUDOR Championship opens with the 52nd Rolex 24 At Daytona on Jan. 25-26.

Cooper solidifies PWC GT presence with Callaway Corvette

Callaway, Cooper, Gill. Photo: PWC
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Pirelli World Challenge could use a “face” of the series from a driving standpoint, and American Michael Cooper is a good candidate to fill that role for 2018.

Cooper, 27, has won PWC Touring Car, GTS and, most recently the SprintX GT titles within the series and has quickly blossomed into one of the series’ top GT stars.

It’s been a rapid rise for the Syosset, N.Y. native, entering into a world filled with series stars and champions such as Johnny O’Connell, Patrick Long, Alvaro Parente and a host of others.

But under O’Connell’s tutelage, Cooper admirably filled the rather gaping shoes vacated by Andy Pilgrim at Cadillac Racing, steering the Cadillac ATS-V.R to multiple race wins in the last two years – including a sweep of this year’s season finale weekend at Sonoma.

Cooper and Jordan Taylor were the model of consistency in SprintX this year, winning once at Canadian Tire Motorsport Park and surviving contact at Circuit of The Americas to take that title.

With Cadillac withdrawing its ATS-V.R program at the end of the year though, Cooper was left a free agent for 2018. Fortunately with one door closed another opened, in the form of the GM-blessed but full Callaway Competition USA effort with its Callaway Corvette C7 GT3-R that will come Stateside next year. Cooper and Daniel Keilwitz will be in the team’s two cars for the full season; the car was fully unveiled last week at the PRI Show in Indianapolis.

The Callaway is a proven commodity in Europe but couldn’t run in the U.S. unless the path was cleared by one of GM’s factory programs to end a direct, potential head-to-head competition.

Moving from the Cadillac to the Callaway Corvette should be a natural transition, Cooper said last week.

“It worked out incredibly well that GM decided to allow Calloway to run the car in the United States and it created an opportunity for me that wouldn’t have been there otherwise,” he told NBC Sports. “I talked to a lot of other GT teams and at the end of the day, I felt like this was the best direction for me to be competitive next year and to also continue furthering my career with General Motors.”

Indeed Cooper has graduated from the Blackdog Speed Shop Chevrolet Camaro Z/28.R in GTS to the Cadillac and now to the Callaway Corvette. Cooper hailed the Cadillac team for what they did for his career growth.

“Working with Cadillac Racing has been instrumental in developing my abilities both on and off the track,” he said. “So I’m definitely a much more well-rounded driver now and have a lot of experience in the World Challenge GT field, so I kind of know what to expect going into that first race and going into that first corner in St. Pete.”

As noted, the car’s success in Europe means it’s a well-oiled machine by the time Reeves Callaway has worked with PWC to bring it Stateside next year. And as Cooper explained, discussions had been underway for a bit of time to ensure his presence in this car and team.

“I think the car is going to be extremely capable. It’s already won championships and races in Europe. I think, in bringing it over here, we’re going to hit the ground running straight away,” he said.

“Calloway had wanted me to come drive for them in July or August. We always kept in touch since then, and there was a lot of work trying to put together a program before they decided that they were going to do a fully fledged factory program. So once they made that decision, I think the pieces were kind of in place already, and the conversations had been had to be able to say ‘You’re going to be our guy.’”

December is late for IMSA programs to get finalized, but it’s relatively early for PWC, with the season not starting until mid-March in St. Petersburg. An extensive testing program should follow, as Callaway establishes its U.S. base and infrastructure.

“It’s definitely early for a Pirelli World Challenge program to be announced in December when we start racing in March. So that’s very good,” he said. “But, the team has a lot of work ahead of them in terms of getting infrastructure set up here in the United States, because a lot of their racing program has been in Europe. So, there will be a testing program, but they have to get the infrastructure in place first. But, we’ll be well prepared for St. Pete, I’m certain of it.

“Last year was the first year when I could sit back, kick my feet up, and know what I was doing next year. So, to be able to have everything done and be able to announce it this early on makes my life less stressful and now I can just focus on preparing myself and my team for next year.”