Dakar: Coma and Roma beat the heat in Stage 5 (VIDEO, UPDATED)

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Extremely hot temperatures curtailed Stage 5 of the Dakar Rally for the bikes and quads, but that proved especially beneficial for the new leader in the former category, Marc Coma.

Coma (pictured) was leading the stage after the first section of the run from Chilecito to Tucuman, Argentina. But shortly into the second section, he suffered a fuel leak on his KTM.

With the help of his water carrier, Jorge Viladoms, he was able to fix the problem. Then, shortly after that, Dakar officials opted to cancel the second part of the stage and that gave Coma the win.

The stage win propelled Coma into the overall lead in bikes as well, as previous leader Joan Barreda suffered from fuel system and navigational problems en route to a 13th place finish. Barreda slipped just one spot to second in the overall, but now is 41:10 behind Coma.

“It was another tough day,” Coma said. “It was really hot out there. It’s also difficult in terms of navigation as well because of the rain last week which makes it difficult to see anything. To get to the end of the stage, I rode for 10 [kilometers] lost in a river bed.

“In general, it’s tough for everyone. For the race lead, you can lose lots of time at any moment. When you open the way, it’s a bit like playing Russian roulette.”

As for the quads, the top three competitors overall – Sergio Lafuente, Ignacio Casale, and Rafal Sonik – all sustained one hour penalties. With that taken into account, Lafuente is now listed as the overall leader by 16:52 over Casale after his stage win today. Sonik lies in third, 23:12 back of Lafuente.

In the cars, Nani Roma regained the overall lead today with a stage win. Roma finished 4:20 ahead of Giniel de Villiers. American driver Robby Gordon appeared to pull off a third-place finish at 20:12 behind, but was later penalized for missing a waypoint on the course and fell to 19th in the stage.

Stage 4 winner Carlos Sainz followed up with a tough 26th-place result today after several navigational errors and an electrical problem on his SMG buggy.

With a one hour penalty compounding matters, Sainz fell from first all the way to eighth in the overall standings. Nasser Al-Attiyah had elevated to second there behind leader Roma but he too incurred a penalty and is now fifth; as a result, Orlando Terranova is now closest to Roma at 31:46 off the pace.

Dmitry Sotnikov won in the trucks to make a 1-2 finish for the Kamaz team, as teammate Andrey Karginov finished second. But those two, along with everyone else, are still chasing Gerard de Rooy in the category. He sits 32 minutes ahead of Karginov in the overall, with Eduard Nikolaev in third.

IndyCar 2017 driver review: Ed Carpenter

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MotorSportsTalk continues its annual review of the Verizon IndyCar Series drivers that raced in 2017. The 2017 season behind the wheel was better for Ed Carpenter than either of the last two years, but still wasn’t ideal results-wise in his six oval starts.

Ed Carpenter, No. 20 Ed Carpenter Racing Chevrolet

  • 2016: 25th Place (5 Starts), Best Finish 18th, Best Start 5th, 0 Top-5, 0 Top-10, 1 Lap Led, 11.2 Avg. Start, 21.8 Avg. Finish
  • 2017: 22nd Place (6 Starts), Best Finish 7th, Best Start 2nd, 0 Top-5, 1 Top-10, 5 Laps Led, 11.3 Avg. Start, 12.3 Avg. Finish

Ed Carpenter’s 2017 season was largely one of frustration, both behind the wheel and as a team owner.

While a respectable turnaround in results occurred – Carpenter finished between seventh and 12th in five of his six oval races after a nightmare season of ending 18th or worse in each of his 2016 starts – this is still not what he sets out to strive for in the races he does. Lost opportunities loomed larger than any official result he or the Ed Carpenter Racing team achieved.

Carpenter and new teammate JR Hildebrand, in for the departed Josef Newgarden, dominated preseason testing in Phoenix but Hildebrand could only muster third in the race, Carpenter a season-best seventh. Then at Indianapolis, Carpenter (second) and Hildebrand (sixth) flew the flag for Chevrolet in qualifying and practice pace, but they fell to 11th and 16th on race day owing to a front-wing change and late-race penalty for passing before a restart.

Both drivers got collected in incidents at Texas. Hildebrand qualified and finished a season-best second in Iowa but that result came only after the ECR crew rebuilt his car from a crash in practice. Then Carpenter had a practice crash in Pocono and despite a rapid rebuild, they missed the clock to qualify by mere minutes and were unable to do so. Carpenter’s spin on a slick Gateway track at the start of the race sent him over Will Power’s nose assembly in one of the scarier looking incidents of the year, although fortunately he was OK.

In a similar refrain as we often write, it’s not that Carpenter’s lost his ability to drive and he remains one of the series’ savviest and smartest people in the paddock. There have been a lot of extenuating circumstances of late, and it almost felt as though this team had “empty nest” components. Since September, Carpenter has had to secure his team’s future with a move away from its Speedway, Ind. shop, line up Spencer Pigot for a full-time drive replacing Hildebrand in the No. 21 car, find a new road/street course driver in the No. 20 car, and manage both driving and owning himself.