Hamilton calls today’s testing crash “a small hiccup” (VIDEO)

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Mercedes driver and former World Champion Lewis Hamilton kept things positive after his Turn One crash today during Formula One testing at Jerez de la Frontera, Spain.

Hamilton suffered a front-wing failure on the new Mercedes W05 before sliding off the track, through a gravel trap and into the tire barriers. He had completed 18 laps prior to the incident, which he took in stride.

“We had a small hiccup but we’ll bounce back from it and hopefully, it’s the first of very few for us,” he said in a team release. “When the car doesn’t stop under braking, it’s always a bit of a heart-in-the-mouth moment but I’ve had a few of those in my career so I’m used to it.

“Initially, I didn’t really know what happened; I braked but the car didn’t slow down and it’s always a little nervy in those moments. But I’m still walking and that’s the main thing.”

Other than the “hiccup,” Hamilton indicated he was pleased with the day overall.

“We had done the most laps of anyone up to [the accident] – and seeing how few cars have been going out on track today shows just how big an achievement our morning’s work had been – so I’m not concerned,” he said.

“Of course, the more running you do, the better placed you’ll be by the time you get to the first race, but to have already done this many laps in just half a day is a really good start.”

Multiple reports from Jerez say that Mercedes will be working overnight to find a wing solution in time for tomorrow, when Hamilton’s teammate, Nico Rosberg, is scheduled to jump in the W05.

“The car now needs to be repaired, which is a challenge in itself at the start of winter testing with regards to the number of spare parts available,” said Mercedes-Benz Motorsport head Toto Wolff. “However, it’s our job to cope with those challenges.”

In the meantime, a YouTube video has begun to go around that involves an at-track reporter from Spanish television network Antena 3 who wound up having the skidding Hamilton as an unexpected visitor. The footage appears to show the moment of the W05’s wing failure, followed by the British driver’s journey into the tires.

Have a decent tax refund coming? Buy Ayrton Senna’s 1993 Monaco-winning car

Photos courtesy Bonhams
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Are you expecting a better than normal tax refund? Did you get a very nice bonus from your company due to the new tax cut?

Well, if you have a good chunk of change hanging around and potentially can be in Monaco on May 11, you can have a chance to bid on the 1993 McLaren-Ford MP4/8A that the late Ayrton Senna drove in — and won — that year’s Monaco Grand Prix.

We’re not just talking about any race winner. It’s also the same car Senna won his sixth Monaco Grand Prix, and the chassis bears the number six.

It’s also the same car Senna piloted to that season’s F1 championship (his third and final title before sadly being killed the next year) and is the first McLaren driven by Senna that’s ever been sold or put up for auction.

The famed Bonhams auction house is overseeing the sale of the car.

“Any Grand Prix-winning car is important, but to have the golden combination of both Senna and Monaco is a seriously rare privilege indeed,” Bonhams global head of motorsport, Mark Osborne, told The Robb Report.

“Senna and Monaco are historically intertwined, and this car represents the culmination of his achievements at the Monegasque track. This is one of the most significant Grand Prix cars ever to appear at auction, and is certainly the most significant Grand Prix car to be offered since the Fangio Mercedes-Benz W196R, which sold for a world record at auction.”

How much might you need? You might want to get a couple of friends to throw in a few bucks as well.

“We expect the car to achieve a considerable seven-figure sum,” Osborne said.

The London newspaper “The Telegraph” predicts the car will sell in the $6.1 million range.”

“This car will set the world record for a Senna car at auction,” Osborne said. “We are as certain as you can be in the auction world.”

While you won’t be able to take the car for a test drive before the auction, it’ll be ready to roar once you pay the price.

“In theory, the buyer could be racing immediately upon receipt of the cleared funds after the auction,” Osborne said. “All systems are primed and ready.”