Some recent racing “Super Bowl” moments

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We’re only a couple of weeks out from SpeedWeeks at Daytona, the kickoff to the 2014 NASCAR season. The Daytona 500 is unique in that it’s the “Super Bowl” of the series, but it is the first event of the year rather than the last.

Anyway, as today, most of the country prepares for Super Bowl XLVIII in New Jersey, we’ll run a quick list of recent memorable moments from racing’s “Super Bowl” equivalent events over the last few years.

Because it’s never too early to look ahead to the blue riband events of the year.

NASCAR: Daytona 500

  • 2013: NASCAR’s new Generation-6 car debuts. Danica Patrick scores the pole, and a media blitz follows. Order is restored in the galaxy when Jimmie Johnson wins.
  • 2012: Rain pushes the 500 to Monday night, then a bizarre crash occurs under a yellow when Juan Pablo Montoya crashed into a jet drier. Underdog race leaders Dave Blaney and Landon Cassill get freight trained on the eventual restart after a red flag, and Matt Kenseth wins.
  • 2011: Trevor Bayne takes a shock win for the Wood Brothers, after David Ragan is penalized for changing lanes on a restart.

IndyCar; Indianapolis 500

  • 2013: Tony Kanaan makes the eventual winning move on a restart with a few laps to go, with his elusive first ‘500 win confirmed as longtime friend and former teammate Dario Franchitti crashes in Turn 1.
  • 2012: Franchitti holds off the charge from Takuma Sato, who loses control after a passing attempt into Turn 1 (the simply awesome Japanese call is linked here). Franchitti’s win, we had no idea at the time, would be his third ‘500 and last of his illustrious IndyCar career.
  • 2011: The centennial ‘500 featured a dramatic finish, as rookie JR Hildebrand crashed lapping fellow rookie Charlie Kimball in Turn 4. Hildebrand slides to the line, but the late Dan Wheldon passes his former car to pull the popular upset for Bryan Herta Autosport.

Formula 1: Monaco Grand Prix

  • 2013: Nico Rosberg dominates an attrition-filled day to score his second career victory for Mercedes.
  • 2012: Michael Schumacher is the fastest qualifier, but dropped five positions to serve an avoidable contact penalty from the previous Grand Prix. Mark Webber capitalizes, en route to his second Monaco victory for Red Bull.
  • 2011: A late red flag for an accident shifts tire strategy, and Sebastian Vettel is able to hold off fellow World Champions Fernando Alonso and Jenson Button for what has been, thus far, his only Monaco win.

Sports cars/FIA WEC: 24 Hours of Le Mans

  • 2013: Early-race accident that claims Allan Simonsen’s life casts a shadow over the rest of the race. Audi still wins, with eventual FIA World Endurance Champions Allan McNish, Tom Kristensen and Loic Duval behind the wheel of the R18 e-tron quattro.
  • 2012: McNish’s late race charge against his teammates Benoit Treluyer, Andre Lotterer and Marcel Fassler ends with a spin, so the defending champs win their second straight race. Anthony Davidson goes for this wild ride in his Toyota, while the other Toyota hits the debuting DeltaWing and driver Satoshi Motoyama tries in vain to repair the wounded prototype.
  • 2011: Audi loses McNish’s car with this horror smash, then loses Mike Rockenfeller’s car in another awful accident. But the one remaining Audi, driven by Treluyer, Lotterer and Fassler, hold off three Peugeots for the win. Simon Pagenaud’s efforts in the new 908 came up a scant 13 seconds short after 24 hours.

F1 drivers relishing Silverstone, Suzuka races in new-style cars

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Formula 1 drivers Sebastian Vettel, Lewis Hamilton and Valtteri Bottas are all relishing the challenge of high-speed tracks such as Silverstone and Suzuka after enjoying their first races in the new-style 2017 cars last weekend.

This season has seen the introduction of revised cars under the new technical regulations that are capable of lapping multiple seconds per lap faster than their predecessors, aided by greater downforce and wider tires.

The new cars raced together for the first time last Sunday in Australia, with the pace difference around the tight confines of the Albert Park street course still notable.

All of the drivers have been impressed by what the new cars are capable of, finding them more fun and rewarding to drive, but it is when F1 hits the classic, high-speed tracks on the calendar that they will really come into their own.

When asked what track they were most looking forward to racing on this year, the top three finishers in Australia gave similar answers.

“Probably Silverstone. I think with that amount of grip and downforce,” Vettel said.

“Probably Suzuka as well later on in the year. Also I guess the cars will be even faster from what they are now.

“So, yeah, I think that would be quite nice. I’m looking forward to that.”

Hamilton added: “Yes, Silverstone, I agree” before Mercedes teammate Bottas echoed his peers’ thoughts.

“I think all the quick ones: Spa; Suzuka; Silverstone will be nice,” Bottas said.

“But I think even street circuits will be a bit more challenging I think – not that it wasn’t challenging before, but with these cars it will be nice.”

One of the biggest changes for 2017 has been the extra physicality of the cars, but Hamilton said he felt no major issues following the race in Australia.

“It was more physical but it was no problem for me and doesn’t look like it was for these guys either,” he said.

Vettel added: “It’s not the most physical circuit in the year. I think later on it will be very interesting. Here is very technical. So, first couple of laps, at least for me, were very intense.

“Obviously it’s easy to have an error, get something wrong under braking, go a bit wide etc. Later on I had a bit of a gap and I could control it, and therefore it was a bit easier.”

Chinese Grand Prix kicks off heavy April F1 stretch on NBCSN

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After an interesting kickoff to the 2017 Formula 1 season on NBCSN with the Australian Grand Prix last week, in just over a week the series will be back in action with the second round of the season, the Chinese Grand Prix from the Shanghai International Circuit. It’s the first of three F1 races in April with the Bahrain and Russian Grands Prix occurring later in the month.

Last year saw Nico Rosberg win in Shanghai over Sebastian Vettel and Daniil Kvyat, the last two having had a coming together at the start of the race before Vettel, now of Ferrari, beat his successor at Red Bull, Kvyat. Lewis Hamilton, meanwhile, only finished seventh after starting 22nd and last, missing qualifying with a mechanical issue.

Vettel enters China on the heels of his victory in Melbourne, but not having won in Shanghai since 2009, when he won for Red Bull for the first time. Mercedes has won the last three Chinese Grands Prix, Rosberg winning last year while Hamilton won in 2014 and 2015. Ferrari last won here in 2013, with Fernando Alonso.

Will Vettel continue with a second straight win to open the season, or will Mercedes reassume its place up top and continue its win streak in Shanghai? Can Red Bull reassert itself and who in the midfield will emerge?

All sessions will be live streamed on NBC Sports or via the NBC Sports App. FP2, qualifying and the race also will air on NBCSN. Leigh Diffey, David Hobbs and Steve Matchett are on the call with Will Buxton reporting from the pits and paddock. As in Melbourne, qualifying and race run during the late hours of the evening on the East Coast, and a bit earlier for those on the West Coast.

Here’s the schedule with where to watch on TV on digital platforms.

  • Practice 1: Thursday, April 6, 10 p.m.-11:30 p.m. ET (digital only)
  • Practice 2: Friday, April 7, 2 a.m.-3:30 a.m. ET (NBCSN)
  • Practice 3: Saturday, April 8, 12 a.m.-1 a.m. ET (digital only)
  • Qualifying: Saturday, April 8, 3 a.m.-4:30 a.m. ET (NBCSN)
  • Race: Sunday, April 9, 1 a.m.-4:30 a.m. ET (NBCSN)

The next race is the Bahrain Grand Prix, on April 16.

United Fiber & Data back, again, for Marco Andretti’s car

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The continued relationship between United Fiber & Data and Andretti Autosport rolls into 2017, although not in the way that was probably planned for either party.

UFD, which served as a major associate sponsor in 2013, primary sponsor for James Hinchcliffe’s No. 27 car in 2014 and a co-primary sponsor for Marco Andretti and Carlos Munoz last year, has now been confirmed for “select races” taking over as primary sponsor of Andretti’s No. 27 Honda this year, starting with next week’s Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach.

This decision comes in the wake of hhgregg’s ongoing business situation, where per media reports (one from USA Today here as a recent example) the electronics retailer plans to close a number of stores and was close to filing for bankruptcy.

“We are strategically exiting markets and stores that are not financially profitable for us,” hhgregg CEO Robert Riesbeck said in a statement in early March, via USA Today. “This is a proactive decision to streamline our store footprint in the markets where we have been, and will continue to be, important to our customers, vendor partners and communities.”

The sponsor had been announced as a multi-year, co-primary sponsor in August. A release from the Andretti Autosport team today didn’t confirm hhgregg’s exit from the team, nor did it state how many races UFD plans to be the primary sponsor. However, it would probably be a surprise to see hhgregg return later this year.

In the release, the team stated: “The rebranding comes as a result of the current issues being faced by hhgregg, leading Andretti Autosport to the decision of transitioning the branding on the No. 27 Indy car piloted by Marco Andretti.”

“We’d like to wish Bob (Riesbeck) and the entire hhgregg family luck as they work through the current situation,” said Andretti Autosport CEO Michael Andretti. “We are blessed to have such loyal and dedicated partners; and while this is an unfortunate situation for hhgregg, we are pleased to have such a strong relationship remaining with United Fiber & Data.”

“We are proud of our longstanding partnership with Andretti Autosport, and we are equally pleased to continue this partnership by serving as a primary sponsor for select IndyCar races this season,” added Bill Hynes, Founder & CEO of United Fiber & Data (UFD). “We look forward to once again bringing the signature colors of the UFD livery to IndyCar tracks across the country.”

Finishing in Australia the ‘first milestone’ for Vandoorne, McLaren

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Stoffel Vandoorne says that getting to the finish of last Sunday’s Formula 1 season-opening Australian Grand Prix was the “first milestone” for McLaren after a difficult winter.

McLaren entered the new year looking to build on a quietly impressive 2016 campaign that saw engine partner Honda make big gains, lifting the team to sixth in the constructors’ championship.

Honda tried to cut the gap to pace-setter Mercedes by revising the layout of its power unit, only for a number of issues to arise through pre-season that left Vandoorne and teammate Fernando Alonso frustrated on the sidelines for much of testing.

McLaren arrived in Australia unsure about its chances, but Alonso was able to fight for P10 through the race before retiring late on due to a suspension issue.

Vandoorne did reach the checkered flag, albeit two laps down after having to complete a power cycle on his car mid-race. The Belgian was eventually classified 13th.

“It was a difficult race, but we knew that before coming here. We have to look at the positives, we finished the race, even with some issues we had,” Vandoorne told NBCSN.

“It was very busy behind the steering wheel doing a lot of changes on the toys and really trying to bring the car home. We even had to come in the pit lane and do a full power cycle of the car. At some point I lost the dash as well so didn’t really know what was going on.”

Despite the issues, Vandoorne said McLaren could take plenty of positives from the race, admitting that he did not expect to even finish the first round in Australia.

“I think it’s the first milestone to finish the race already. After Barcelona we didn’t expect this,” Vandoorne said.

“As a total package, we’re definitely not there. We don’t have the pace yet to compete with the cars ahead, that’s for sure. We need a big push.

“Hopefully China shows another step for us.”