Honda Indy 200 At Mid-Ohio - Day 3

IndyCar confirms 2014 Leaders Circle entrants

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IndyCar’s collective team payout structure, formerly called TEAM (Team Enhancement and Allocation Matrix) and in more recent years, the Leaders Circle, was announced today. The release from IndyCar first, and then some more details on what it means:

INDYCAR announced today enhancements to the bonus structure and the 21 entrants that will be part of its Leaders Circle program for the 2014 IndyCar Series season.

The Leaders Circle program was established in 2002 to provide incentives to teams that participate full time in the IndyCar Series. Each Leaders Circle member is assured a minimum of $1 million for the 18-race season if the entrant successfully qualifies for the Indianapolis 500 Mile Race.

“The Leaders Circle program is an important resource for full-time teams in the IndyCar Series,” said Derrick Walker, President of Competition and Operations, INDYCAR. “We are looking at ways to continue to grow this resource in the future and further reward our teams for their continued participation in the series.”

Twenty entrants were selected based on their standing in the 2013 IndyCar Series entrant points, including Bryan Herta Autosport (car number and driver TBA). The entry for the No. 2 Verizon Team Penske car driven by Juan Pablo Montoya is also a new Leaders Circle member for 2014 through a partnership with Dragon Racing.

Additionally, all entrants will continue to compete for bonuses that will now be paid to the top-10 finishers at each IndyCar Series race aside from the races at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway (Indianapolis 500), Pocono Raceway and Auto Club Speedway. The race bonuses are: $30,000 for first place, $20,000 for second place, $15,000 for third, $10,000 for fourth, $9,000 for fifth, $8,000 for sixth, $7,000 for seventh, $5,000 for eighth, $4,000 for ninth and $2,000 for 10th at each race. At Pocono and Auto Club, the winning team will receive $40,000 with the remaining payouts remaining the same as other races.

Non-Leaders Circle entrants will compete for payouts awarded to the top-five finishers. In each race excluding the races at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway (Indianapolis 500), Pocono and Auto Club, the highest-finishing non-Leaders Circle entrant will receive $20,000. At Pocono and Auto Club, the highest finishing team will receive $30,000.

The next-placed Non-Leaders Circle entrants will receive $15,000, and $10,000, respectively. The fourth and fifth-placed Non-Leader Circle entrants will each receive $5,000 at all races excluding the Indianapolis 500.

The IndyCar Series driver champion and championship entrant again will share a $1 million bonus, with second through 10th in the standings sharing bonuses of $250,000, $90,000, $75,000, $60,000, $50,000, $40,000, $35,000, $25,000 and $15,000.

Contingency prizes will continue to be awarded at IndyCar Series events.

To add a bit of insight beyond the release from INDYCAR above, a few numbers to note as far as Leaders Circle changes over the last two years:

  • In 2012, the Leaders Circle had a 20-car cap, with 18 carrying over from 2011 and two new spots awarded to Ed Carpenter Racing and what was then Lotus Dragon Racing. Payouts in each race aside from the Indianapolis 500 that year saw the highest-finishing entrant receive $80,000, followed by $65,000, $53,000, $40,000 and $26,000 for fifth highest finisher among the Non-Leader’s Circle entries.
  • In 2013, the number of Leaders Circle entrants was increased to 22, while the per-race payouts to non-Leader Circle entrants decreased. The three spots outside the top-22 in entrant points were awarded Sarah Fisher Hartman Racing, Dragon Racing and HVM Racing (which became E.J. Viso’s car for Andretti Autosport, with HVM support). In each race aside from the Indianapolis 500 were awarded to the top three, with the highest-finishing entrant will receive $40,000, followed by $35,000 and $30,000.
  • So with those offered, the 2014 numbers for non-Leaders Circle entrants go down for a third consecutive year to $20,000, $15,000 and $10,000, except for the Pocono and Auto Club races where the top non-Leaders Circle entrant will get $30,000.
  • The absentees on the list of projected or expected full-time cars includes the NTT Data Chip Ganassi Racing No. 8 driven by Ryan Briscoe, Panther Racing’s No. 4 and the second Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing entry, the No. 16. The No. 8 was not fielded full-time in 2013; Panther’s status for 2014 is TBD and RLL was not in the Leader Circle last year.
  • The note of Bryan Herta Autosport listed as Bryan Herta Autosport and not Barracuda Racing, without a car number listed, provides a very strong hint that Barracuda will not return to the team as title sponsor, or at the very least, will return in a minimized role.

Here’s the official chart of those who will receive the per-race number, per INDYCAR:

2014 INDYCAR SERIES LEADER CIRCLE ENTRANTS

Number Car name Driver Engine
2 Verizon Team Penske Juan Pablo Montoya Chevrolet
3 Team Penske Helio Castroneves Chevrolet
7 SMP Racing Mikhail Aleshin Honda
9 Target Chip Ganassi Racing Scott Dixon Chevrolet
10 Target Chip Ganassi Racing Tony Kanaan Chevrolet
11 Mistic KVSH Racing Sebastien Bourdais Chevrolet
12 Verizon Team Penske Will Power Chevrolet
14 ABC Supply A.J. Foyt Racing Takuma Sato Honda
15 National Guard  Graham Rahal Honda
17 AFS KVAFS Racing Sebastian Saavedra Chevrolet
18 Dale Coyne Racing TBA Honda
19 Dale Coyne Racing Justin Wilson Honda
20 Fuzzy’s Vodka/Ed Carpenter Racing Ed Carpenter/Mike Conway Chevrolet
25 Snapple Marco Andretti Honda
27 United Fiber & Data James Hinchcliffe Honda
28 DHL Ryan Hunter-Reay Honda
34 Cinsay AndrettiTV.com HVM Carlos Munoz Honda
67 Sarah Fisher Hartman Racing Josef Newgarden Honda
77 Schmidt Peterson Motorsports Simon Pagenaud Honda
83 Novo Nordisk Chip Ganassi Racing Charlie Kimball Chevrolet
TBA Bryan Herta Autosport TBA Honda

Dixon fast once again as times keep falling in Mid-Ohio third practice

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LEXINGTON, Ohio – Scott Dixon being fast at the Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course is not new.

But Scott Dixon dropping a lap of 1:03.7244 at the Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course is new.

Dixon, driver of the No. 9 Target Chip Ganassi Racing Chevrolet and leader of first practice, lowered the mark to that aforementioned time in this morning’s 45-minute third practice session for Sunday’s Honda Indy 200.

And mind you, this time is done on Firestone’s primary black sidewall tires on a track that grips up and gets faster as a session goes on.

Dixon’s official track record is 1:04.5814, set last year in qualifying. But if it’s dry (2 p.m. ET on NBCSN), and the Firestone red alternates come out to play, there’s not just a chance that track record will be beat – it could be obliterated.

In the non-Dixon class, Simon Pagenaud, Will Power, Josef Newgarden and Tony Kanaan all also made it into the 1:03 bracket. Max Chilton was an impressive sixth.

Top Honda in this practice was Graham Rahal, as he was on Friday. Except that position is seventh.

The one red flag flew when Spencer Pigot ran in deep at Turn 4 and beached his No. 20 Fuzzy’s Vodka Chevrolet, but the Ed Carpenter Racing driver resumed and returned to the pits with no damage.

Times are below.

MidOFP3

Sainz handed Germany grid drop for blocking Massa

HOCKENHEIM, GERMANY - JULY 30: Carlos Sainz of Spain driving the (55) Scuderia Toro Rosso STR11 Ferrari 060/5 turbo on track  during qualifying for the Formula One Grand Prix of Germany at Hockenheimring on July 30, 2016 in Hockenheim, Germany.  (Photo by Charles Coates/Getty Images)
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Carlos Sainz Jr. has been given a three-place grid penalty for the German Grand Prix after blocking Felipe Massa during Q2 on Saturday at Hockenheim.

Sainz qualified 13th for Toro Rosso, finishing three-tenths of a second off Massa who was the final driver to make it through to Q3 for Williams.

However, Massa was forced to abandon one of his flying laps during Q2 after coming across a slow-moving Sainz at Turn 2.

Sainz tried to get out of the way late on, taking to the grass at the inside of Turn 2, but the damage had been done.

Massa complained to Williams over the radio before race control confirmed it would be investigating the matter after the session.

The FIA stewards in Germany confirmed soon after qualifying that Sainz would drop three places on the grid for Sunday’s race, leaving him 16th for Toro Rosso.

Sainz also received two penalty points on his FIA super licence for the incident, taking him up to four for the 12-month period.

Sainz will still be the highest-starting Toro Rosso in Germany after teammate Daniil Kvyat could only qualify 19th. The Russian will rise to 18th on the grid by virtue of Romain Grosjean’s gearbox penalty.

The German Grand Prix is live on NBCSN and the NBC Sports app from 7am ET on Sunday.

Rosberg: Germany pole satisfying after Q3 setback, heavy fuel run

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Nico Rosberg said that scoring pole position for the German Grand Prix was particularly satisfying given his early setback in Q3 after an electrical issue that forced Mercedes to fuel him heavily for his final run.

Rosberg and Mercedes teammate Lewis Hamilton had exchanged fastest times throughout the week, leading to a showdown for pole in Q3 at Hockenheim.

Rosberg was forced to abandon his first run in Q3 after suffering an electrical issue coming out of Turn 13 that caused his throttle to malfunction.

Mercedes brought Rosberg in and resolved the issue before fuelling him for three laps heading into the final minutes of the session.

Rosberg produced a stunning lap of 1:14.363 to edge out Hamilton, the Briton unable to respond with his final low-fuel qualifying lap.

“It was a great feeling, a great lap,” Rosberg said after qualifying.

“Not only was it just one lap that I had but I also had extra fuel to make sure I had an extra shot if a mistake or something happened, so fuelled for three laps.

“So that’s some more time in the bag there. I was really satisfied with that one, that was cool.”

Rosberg has no concerns about the reliability of his Mercedes W07 Hybrid heading into Sunday’s race despite the electrical issue, and is braced for a close fight with Hamilton and the Red Bull drivers.

“I don’t know what it was. It just suddenly lost the throttle, cut completely the engine,” Rosberg said.

“Just at the end of the lap, so that was disappointing, but I’m sure we’ll fix it for tomorrow.

“It’s never happened before so I’m sure it will be OK.

“Definitely will be an exciting race against Lewis and the Red Bull, and maybe also the Ferraris, but they’re a bit further back it seems.”

The German Grand Prix is live on NBCSN and the NBC Sports app from 7am ET on Sunday.

Nico Rosberg rallies to German GP pole at Hockenheim

HOCKENHEIM, GERMANY - JULY 30: Nico Rosberg of Germany driving the (6) Mercedes AMG Petronas F1 Team Mercedes F1 WO7 Mercedes PU106C Hybrid turbo on track during qualifying for the Formula One Grand Prix of Germany at Hockenheimring on July 30, 2016 in Hockenheim, Germany.  (Photo by Charles Coates/Getty Images)
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Nico Rosberg bounced back from an electronic issue on his car in qualifying to secure pole position for his home Formula 1 race at Hockenheim in Germany.

Rosberg edged out Mercedes teammate and title rival Lewis Hamilton by one-tenth of a second in Q3 to take pole on home soil for the second time, his first coming two years ago at Hockenheim.

Rosberg and Hamilton were neck-and-neck through their first flying laps in Q3, only for Rosberg to slow in the final sector before pulling into the pits due to an electronic error. Hamilton completed his lap, going six-tenths of a second faster than everyone else to take provisional pole.

With the error resolved, Rosberg emerged from the pits early for his final Q3 run, having the track to himself. The German driver went one-tenth of a second faster than Hamilton to wrestle away provisional pole, piling the pressure on the Briton ahead of his final run.

Hamilton went faster than Rosberg through the first sector, but the rest of the lap fell away from him, meaning he could gain just 0.02 seconds to stay in second place, handing his rival pole.

Daniel Ricciardo qualified third ahead of teammate Max Verstappen, as the two Red Bulls once again defeated Ferrari with relative ease. Kimi Raikkonen finished fifth for the Scuderia, two-tenths clear of Sebastian Vettel in P6.

Nico Hulkenberg led Force India’s charge in P7 ahead of Williams’ Valtteri Bottas, with their respective teammates Sergio Perez and Felipe Massa following in P9 and P10.

Haas came close to picking up its first Q3 appearance in F1 as Esteban Gutierrez qualified 11th, having been pushed out of the top 10 after late improvements from Perez and Massa. Teammate Romain Grosjean failed to match Gutierrez for pace, finishing 15th, but will drop to P20 on the grid due to a gearbox penalty.

McLaren was unable to repeat its double-Q3 run from Hungary as Jenson Button and Fernando Alonso qualified 12th and 14th respectively, split by Carlos Sainz Jr. in the lead Toro Rosso in P13. However, Sainz will have to speak to the stewards after appearing to impede Massa’s hot lap during Q2.

Renault enjoyed mixed fortunes as Jolyon Palmer made his way through to Q2, qualifying 16th, but teammate Kevin Magnussen was narrowly edged out in Q1 after a late improvement from Sainz. The Dane eventually finished the session in 17th.

Pascal Wehrlein finished just one-tenth of a second shy of a Q2 berth in P18, with Manor teammate Rio Haryanto two places further back. Toro Rosso’s Daniil Kvyat split the pair, enduring another tough session by qualifying 19th. Sauber drivers Felipe Nasr and Marcus Ericsson locked out the back row of the grid, half a second adrift from Q2.