IndyCar confirms 2014 Leaders Circle entrants

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IndyCar’s collective team payout structure, formerly called TEAM (Team Enhancement and Allocation Matrix) and in more recent years, the Leaders Circle, was announced today. The release from IndyCar first, and then some more details on what it means:

INDYCAR announced today enhancements to the bonus structure and the 21 entrants that will be part of its Leaders Circle program for the 2014 IndyCar Series season.

The Leaders Circle program was established in 2002 to provide incentives to teams that participate full time in the IndyCar Series. Each Leaders Circle member is assured a minimum of $1 million for the 18-race season if the entrant successfully qualifies for the Indianapolis 500 Mile Race.

“The Leaders Circle program is an important resource for full-time teams in the IndyCar Series,” said Derrick Walker, President of Competition and Operations, INDYCAR. “We are looking at ways to continue to grow this resource in the future and further reward our teams for their continued participation in the series.”

Twenty entrants were selected based on their standing in the 2013 IndyCar Series entrant points, including Bryan Herta Autosport (car number and driver TBA). The entry for the No. 2 Verizon Team Penske car driven by Juan Pablo Montoya is also a new Leaders Circle member for 2014 through a partnership with Dragon Racing.

Additionally, all entrants will continue to compete for bonuses that will now be paid to the top-10 finishers at each IndyCar Series race aside from the races at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway (Indianapolis 500), Pocono Raceway and Auto Club Speedway. The race bonuses are: $30,000 for first place, $20,000 for second place, $15,000 for third, $10,000 for fourth, $9,000 for fifth, $8,000 for sixth, $7,000 for seventh, $5,000 for eighth, $4,000 for ninth and $2,000 for 10th at each race. At Pocono and Auto Club, the winning team will receive $40,000 with the remaining payouts remaining the same as other races.

Non-Leaders Circle entrants will compete for payouts awarded to the top-five finishers. In each race excluding the races at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway (Indianapolis 500), Pocono and Auto Club, the highest-finishing non-Leaders Circle entrant will receive $20,000. At Pocono and Auto Club, the highest finishing team will receive $30,000.

The next-placed Non-Leaders Circle entrants will receive $15,000, and $10,000, respectively. The fourth and fifth-placed Non-Leader Circle entrants will each receive $5,000 at all races excluding the Indianapolis 500.

The IndyCar Series driver champion and championship entrant again will share a $1 million bonus, with second through 10th in the standings sharing bonuses of $250,000, $90,000, $75,000, $60,000, $50,000, $40,000, $35,000, $25,000 and $15,000.

Contingency prizes will continue to be awarded at IndyCar Series events.

To add a bit of insight beyond the release from INDYCAR above, a few numbers to note as far as Leaders Circle changes over the last two years:

  • In 2012, the Leaders Circle had a 20-car cap, with 18 carrying over from 2011 and two new spots awarded to Ed Carpenter Racing and what was then Lotus Dragon Racing. Payouts in each race aside from the Indianapolis 500 that year saw the highest-finishing entrant receive $80,000, followed by $65,000, $53,000, $40,000 and $26,000 for fifth highest finisher among the Non-Leader’s Circle entries.
  • In 2013, the number of Leaders Circle entrants was increased to 22, while the per-race payouts to non-Leader Circle entrants decreased. The three spots outside the top-22 in entrant points were awarded Sarah Fisher Hartman Racing, Dragon Racing and HVM Racing (which became E.J. Viso’s car for Andretti Autosport, with HVM support). In each race aside from the Indianapolis 500 were awarded to the top three, with the highest-finishing entrant will receive $40,000, followed by $35,000 and $30,000.
  • So with those offered, the 2014 numbers for non-Leaders Circle entrants go down for a third consecutive year to $20,000, $15,000 and $10,000, except for the Pocono and Auto Club races where the top non-Leaders Circle entrant will get $30,000.
  • The absentees on the list of projected or expected full-time cars includes the NTT Data Chip Ganassi Racing No. 8 driven by Ryan Briscoe, Panther Racing’s No. 4 and the second Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing entry, the No. 16. The No. 8 was not fielded full-time in 2013; Panther’s status for 2014 is TBD and RLL was not in the Leader Circle last year.
  • The note of Bryan Herta Autosport listed as Bryan Herta Autosport and not Barracuda Racing, without a car number listed, provides a very strong hint that Barracuda will not return to the team as title sponsor, or at the very least, will return in a minimized role.

Here’s the official chart of those who will receive the per-race number, per INDYCAR:

2014 INDYCAR SERIES LEADER CIRCLE ENTRANTS

Number Car name Driver Engine
2 Verizon Team Penske Juan Pablo Montoya Chevrolet
3 Team Penske Helio Castroneves Chevrolet
7 SMP Racing Mikhail Aleshin Honda
9 Target Chip Ganassi Racing Scott Dixon Chevrolet
10 Target Chip Ganassi Racing Tony Kanaan Chevrolet
11 Mistic KVSH Racing Sebastien Bourdais Chevrolet
12 Verizon Team Penske Will Power Chevrolet
14 ABC Supply A.J. Foyt Racing Takuma Sato Honda
15 National Guard  Graham Rahal Honda
17 AFS KVAFS Racing Sebastian Saavedra Chevrolet
18 Dale Coyne Racing TBA Honda
19 Dale Coyne Racing Justin Wilson Honda
20 Fuzzy’s Vodka/Ed Carpenter Racing Ed Carpenter/Mike Conway Chevrolet
25 Snapple Marco Andretti Honda
27 United Fiber & Data James Hinchcliffe Honda
28 DHL Ryan Hunter-Reay Honda
34 Cinsay AndrettiTV.com HVM Carlos Munoz Honda
67 Sarah Fisher Hartman Racing Josef Newgarden Honda
77 Schmidt Peterson Motorsports Simon Pagenaud Honda
83 Novo Nordisk Chip Ganassi Racing Charlie Kimball Chevrolet
TBA Bryan Herta Autosport TBA Honda

IMSA: Sebring Day 2 of two-day test notebook

Photo courtesy of IMSA
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Testing across several IMSA sanctioned series continued at Sebring International Raceway on Tuesday as preparations continue for next month’s events during the weekend of the Mobil 1 12 Hours of Sebring.

Below are highlights from Day 2 of testing around the 3.74-mile road course.

Eurosport Racing Continues Work with Mazda Prototype Challenge Chassis

Teams in the Prototype Challenge Presented by Mazda championship completed their second day of testing on Tuesday. Among them, Eurosport Racing continued their work with the only Mazda Prototype Challenge (MPC) entries in the field, in the hands of drivers Dr. Tim George (in the No. 24 entry) and Jon Brownson (in the No. 34).

“Right now, I’m driving by myself so we’re trying to make the car comfortable enough to last an hour and 45 minutes with just me in the car,” George said of their preparation efforts. “We’re trying to set up the car where it’s quick, yet it and can last, both the car and for me to make sure we don’t tire out, get fatigued and make mistakes.”

The 1 hour 45 minute window that George referenced represents the race times for the 2018 season, up considerably from last year’s sprint format that featured a pair of 45-minute races across a race weekend.

Though that change represents a drastic shift in driving philosophy, it is one that George welcomes.

“The new rules for the endurance races are great, I enjoy it a lot,” said George. “It gives you a chance to think through things differently with strategy. It also gives you a chance if you blow it…in a sprint race if you make a mistake you don’t get a chance to come back.”

Florida Drivers in Continental Tire Challenge Eager for Hometown Race at Sebring

A strong contingent of drivers from Florida are represented in the Continental Tire SportsCar Challenge, and next month’s 12 Hours of Sebring weekend will see them compete on home soil.

“I grew up in Tallahassee and I live in Orlando now, so Sebring has been my home track since day one,” said Paul Holton, driver of the No. 76 Compass Racing McLaren GT4, which finished 14th at the season-opening race at Daytona International Speedway. “I’ve spent a lot of time down here and really enjoy the place. It’s a nice, quaint little town not far from Orlando so it’s a quick, easy drive down for me.”

Fellow Floridian Ramin Abdolvahabi, a native of Palm Beach Gardens, Florida and driver of the No. 09 Automatic Racing Aston Martin Vantage, revealed that, even though Sebring is only two hours from his hometown, this week’s test was his first time at the track in two years.

“I haven’t been here for two years, so coming back is like coming home,” he said. “It’s a fantastic track and it’s one of the iconic tracks in the world so being at Sebring – a small town, my hometown, welcoming – it’s fantastic. I went on the track a couple of times yesterday and it’s just like wearing an old shoe, it just fits and it’s fantastic. Hopefully, the race will go well and the weather will hold, so anyone who’s out there, come and see us!”

Frank Raso Trades in Airplanes for Porsches at Sebring

Several IMSA drivers boast “day jobs” outside of their racing gigs. Among them, Frank Raso’s work falls outside of ordinary jobs like doctor or lawyer. Rather, Raso flies airplanes for a living.

“I’m an airline pilot for a major airline,” said Raso, who tested the No. 10 Topp Racing Porsche 911 GT3 Cup car at Sebring. “I’ve been flying for almost 30 years, and it’s allowed me, with all my time off and things like that to do this and fall back into racing again. I messed with it a little bit when I was younger, but it was, of course, expensive, so I got away from it for a while. I decided I wanted to get back into it in kind of my last couple of years before I get too old.”

Raso explained that the skills he practices while flying planes are more than transferable to his driving duties in a Porsche GT3 Cup car.

“Flying an airliner or flying any airplane, we have checklists, but everything is kind of done in order. It’s almost in a robot fashion type of a thing where you do this, you do this, you do this and you have to make sure you hit all your marks and fly the airplane with precision.

“So, when you get in these Cup cars, with no anti-lock brakes, no traction control, and no driver assist items, you have to make sure you hit your marks, when you’re accelerating, when you’re turning in. You have to be alert. It keeps your wits about you. The car can step out at any time. They’re a very difficult car to drive, but they’re a lot of fun.”
The 54-year-old Raso posted a best finish of fourth, on four separate occasions, in a part-time schedule during the 2017 Porsche GT3 Cup Challenge USA by Yokohama season as a competitor in the Gold Cup class.
Newcomers Get Taste of Porsche GT3 Cup Challenge
A number of new drivers got to sample Porsche GT3 Cup Challenge cars during the two days of testing at Sebring. Among them was amateur racer Scott Welham, who got his first taste of professional racing during the two-day outing at Sebring.
And he had a strong support system backing him up in the Kelly-Moss Road and Race team, the defending Porsche GT3 Cup Challenge champions with driver Jake Eidson.
“Here, you’ve got somebody that actually does coaching, data acquisition, track management – these are all separate people – plant manager, owner, a car-setup guy, you’ve got someone that bills you – which isn’t always a good thing, but you know, you just have that huge, huge support group that enables you to focus on driving,” Welham said of the team’s influence on his development over the two days.
IMSA’s next visit to Sebring will be for the Mobil 1 12 Hours of Sebring on March 17.