Honda Indy 200 At Mid-Ohio - Day 3

IndyCar confirms 2014 Leaders Circle entrants

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IndyCar’s collective team payout structure, formerly called TEAM (Team Enhancement and Allocation Matrix) and in more recent years, the Leaders Circle, was announced today. The release from IndyCar first, and then some more details on what it means:

INDYCAR announced today enhancements to the bonus structure and the 21 entrants that will be part of its Leaders Circle program for the 2014 IndyCar Series season.

The Leaders Circle program was established in 2002 to provide incentives to teams that participate full time in the IndyCar Series. Each Leaders Circle member is assured a minimum of $1 million for the 18-race season if the entrant successfully qualifies for the Indianapolis 500 Mile Race.

“The Leaders Circle program is an important resource for full-time teams in the IndyCar Series,” said Derrick Walker, President of Competition and Operations, INDYCAR. “We are looking at ways to continue to grow this resource in the future and further reward our teams for their continued participation in the series.”

Twenty entrants were selected based on their standing in the 2013 IndyCar Series entrant points, including Bryan Herta Autosport (car number and driver TBA). The entry for the No. 2 Verizon Team Penske car driven by Juan Pablo Montoya is also a new Leaders Circle member for 2014 through a partnership with Dragon Racing.

Additionally, all entrants will continue to compete for bonuses that will now be paid to the top-10 finishers at each IndyCar Series race aside from the races at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway (Indianapolis 500), Pocono Raceway and Auto Club Speedway. The race bonuses are: $30,000 for first place, $20,000 for second place, $15,000 for third, $10,000 for fourth, $9,000 for fifth, $8,000 for sixth, $7,000 for seventh, $5,000 for eighth, $4,000 for ninth and $2,000 for 10th at each race. At Pocono and Auto Club, the winning team will receive $40,000 with the remaining payouts remaining the same as other races.

Non-Leaders Circle entrants will compete for payouts awarded to the top-five finishers. In each race excluding the races at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway (Indianapolis 500), Pocono and Auto Club, the highest-finishing non-Leaders Circle entrant will receive $20,000. At Pocono and Auto Club, the highest finishing team will receive $30,000.

The next-placed Non-Leaders Circle entrants will receive $15,000, and $10,000, respectively. The fourth and fifth-placed Non-Leader Circle entrants will each receive $5,000 at all races excluding the Indianapolis 500.

The IndyCar Series driver champion and championship entrant again will share a $1 million bonus, with second through 10th in the standings sharing bonuses of $250,000, $90,000, $75,000, $60,000, $50,000, $40,000, $35,000, $25,000 and $15,000.

Contingency prizes will continue to be awarded at IndyCar Series events.

To add a bit of insight beyond the release from INDYCAR above, a few numbers to note as far as Leaders Circle changes over the last two years:

  • In 2012, the Leaders Circle had a 20-car cap, with 18 carrying over from 2011 and two new spots awarded to Ed Carpenter Racing and what was then Lotus Dragon Racing. Payouts in each race aside from the Indianapolis 500 that year saw the highest-finishing entrant receive $80,000, followed by $65,000, $53,000, $40,000 and $26,000 for fifth highest finisher among the Non-Leader’s Circle entries.
  • In 2013, the number of Leaders Circle entrants was increased to 22, while the per-race payouts to non-Leader Circle entrants decreased. The three spots outside the top-22 in entrant points were awarded Sarah Fisher Hartman Racing, Dragon Racing and HVM Racing (which became E.J. Viso’s car for Andretti Autosport, with HVM support). In each race aside from the Indianapolis 500 were awarded to the top three, with the highest-finishing entrant will receive $40,000, followed by $35,000 and $30,000.
  • So with those offered, the 2014 numbers for non-Leaders Circle entrants go down for a third consecutive year to $20,000, $15,000 and $10,000, except for the Pocono and Auto Club races where the top non-Leaders Circle entrant will get $30,000.
  • The absentees on the list of projected or expected full-time cars includes the NTT Data Chip Ganassi Racing No. 8 driven by Ryan Briscoe, Panther Racing’s No. 4 and the second Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing entry, the No. 16. The No. 8 was not fielded full-time in 2013; Panther’s status for 2014 is TBD and RLL was not in the Leader Circle last year.
  • The note of Bryan Herta Autosport listed as Bryan Herta Autosport and not Barracuda Racing, without a car number listed, provides a very strong hint that Barracuda will not return to the team as title sponsor, or at the very least, will return in a minimized role.

Here’s the official chart of those who will receive the per-race number, per INDYCAR:


Number Car name Driver Engine
2 Verizon Team Penske Juan Pablo Montoya Chevrolet
3 Team Penske Helio Castroneves Chevrolet
7 SMP Racing Mikhail Aleshin Honda
9 Target Chip Ganassi Racing Scott Dixon Chevrolet
10 Target Chip Ganassi Racing Tony Kanaan Chevrolet
11 Mistic KVSH Racing Sebastien Bourdais Chevrolet
12 Verizon Team Penske Will Power Chevrolet
14 ABC Supply A.J. Foyt Racing Takuma Sato Honda
15 National Guard  Graham Rahal Honda
17 AFS KVAFS Racing Sebastian Saavedra Chevrolet
18 Dale Coyne Racing TBA Honda
19 Dale Coyne Racing Justin Wilson Honda
20 Fuzzy’s Vodka/Ed Carpenter Racing Ed Carpenter/Mike Conway Chevrolet
25 Snapple Marco Andretti Honda
27 United Fiber & Data James Hinchcliffe Honda
28 DHL Ryan Hunter-Reay Honda
34 Cinsay HVM Carlos Munoz Honda
67 Sarah Fisher Hartman Racing Josef Newgarden Honda
77 Schmidt Peterson Motorsports Simon Pagenaud Honda
83 Novo Nordisk Chip Ganassi Racing Charlie Kimball Chevrolet
TBA Bryan Herta Autosport TBA Honda

IndyCar 2015 Driver Review: Carlos Munoz

Carlos Munoz
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MotorSportsTalk continues its run through the driver-by-driver roster in this year’s Verizon IndyCar Series. Next up in 13th is Carlos Munoz, who fell back to earth a bit after winning Indianapolis 500, then series rookie-of-the-year honors in consecutive years.

Carlos Munoz, No. 26 Andretti Autosport Honda

  • 2014: 8th Place, Best Finish 3rd, Best Start 3rd, 3 Podiums, 5 Top-5, 8 Top-10, 0 Laps Led, 10.5 Avg. Start, 12.6 Avg. Finish
  • 2015: 13th Place, 1 Win, Best Start 4th, 1 Podium, 3 Top-5, 7 Top-10, 25 Laps Led, 14.0 Avg. Start, 12.1 Avg. Finish

Munoz fell down to earth a little bit in his second full season in IndyCar, albeit not as badly as fellow 2014 rookie Jack Hawksworth, who’d switched teams and had a myriad of issues throughout the season. He won his first race in the rain at Detroit race one, which was well judged, but there were precious other highlights from the driver who has showcased “wow” potential in the past.

His qualifying fell off year-to-year and that was probably the single thing to pinpoint as to why the decline occurred, falling from eighth to 13th in points. What had been a 10.5 average in 2014 fell to 14th this year, and behind teammates Marco Andretti and Ryan Hunter-Reay.

Ovals seemed his strongest type of circuit this year on the whole. Like teammate Justin Wilson, he’d been in position to score what would have been his third straight Indianapolis 500 top-five finish if a late splash of fuel wasn’t needed. Sixth at Texas from fourth on the grid marked his best overall weekend of the year, and fifth at Iowa and Pocono were also fairly good results.

But whereas Munoz picked his spots well last year and delivered a handful of podiums, his Detroit win marked his only podium visit this year. He didn’t really make much of an impression and was more anonymous than not over the course of the year. His future with Andretti is uncertain for 2016.

Williams maximizes wet setup work despite limited running in Sochi

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With action pretty much limited in both practice sessions due to the diesel spillage in free practice one and rain in free practice two for the Russian Grand Prix in Sochi, teams could only do limited wet-weather runs.

Williams Martini Racing tried to make the best of the circumstances, as one of only five teams that completed laps in FP2 (McLaren, Red Bull, Toro Rosso and Ferrari) with eight cars.

Felipe Massa led second practice but it was an essentially meaningless session.

“It was quite a stunted session today which stopped us from completing all of the work we wanted to,” said Rob Smedley, Williams’ head of vehicle performance. “We had planned to run in the wet but we had a strange situation this afternoon in that half of the circuit was much wetter than the other half which made most of the tests null and void.

“We have been working on the wet set-up of the car and so wanted to get out at the end of FP2 to see the progress we have made. In a similar vein to our low speed corner work in Singapore, we seem to be making progress. We got through all of the bits and pieces we wanted to get through in terms of control systems and power unit set-up, and we have to go into tomorrow with a good plan for FP3 to get the car set-up for qualifying and the race.”

Valtteri Bottas finished third in Sochi a year ago, while Massa seeks a rebound after a fuel flow issue in qualifying resigned him to a Q1 elimination and an 11th place finish.