NASCAR Hall of Fame announces 20 nominees for sixth induction class

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DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. – The NASCAR Hall of Fame on Friday announced the 20 nominees for its sixth induction class, set to be voted upon on May 21.

New rules for this year’s field of nominees included reducing the size of eligible candidates from 25 to 20 eligible drivers, as well as making drivers 55 or older as of Dec. 31, 2013 and with a minimum of 10 years of racing immediately eligible for Hall induction.

Also, any competitor with 30 or more years of NASCAR competition, regardless of age, is also automatically eligible to be voted upon.

Among nominees for the sixth class include two-time Sprint Cup champion Terry Labonte, who will start his 33rd and final Daytona 500 on Sunday. Other luminaries include 1988 Cup champ and 16-time Most Popular Driver Bill Elliott, nine-time champion (across Whelen Modified Tour and K&N Pro Series East) Mike Stefanik, 19-race winner Buddy Baker and championship team owner and engine builder Robert Yates.

The five nominees receiving the most votes will make up the 2015 Hall of Fame induction class.

The Hall also announced the five nominees for the first Landmark Award for Outstanding Contributions to NASCAR: H. Clay Earles, Anne B. France, Raymond Parks, Ralph Seagraves and Ken Squier. The nominee with the most votes will win the award.

Parks is the only individual to be included as both a NASCAR Hall of Fame nominee and a Landmark Award nominee.

The 20 nominees for induction into the NASCAR Hall of Fame are:

* Buddy Baker, won 19 times in NASCAR’s premier (now Sprint Cup) series, including the Daytona 500 and Southern 500

* Red Byron, first NASCAR premier series champion, in 1949

* Richard Childress, 11-time car owner champion in NASCAR’s three national series

* Jerry Cook, six-time NASCAR Modified champion

* Bill Elliott, 1988 premier series champion, two-time Daytona 500 winner and 16-time Most Popular Driver

* Ray Fox, legendary engine builder and owner of cars driven by Buck Baker, Junior Johnson and others

* Rick Hendrick, 14-time car owner champion in NASCAR’s three national series

* Bobby Isaac, 1970 NASCAR premier series champion

* Terry Labonte, Two-time NASCAR premier series champion

* Fred Lorenzen, 26 wins and winner of the Daytona 500 and World 600

* Raymond Parks, NASCAR’s first champion car owner

* Benny Parsons, 1973 NASCAR premier series champion

* Larry Phillips, only five-time NASCAR Whelen All-American Series national champion

* Wendell Scott, NASCAR trailblazer was the first African-American NASCAR premier series race winner, and first to be nominated for induction into the NASCAR Hall of Fame

* O. Bruton Smith, builder of Charlotte Motor Speedway and architect of Speedway Motorsports Inc.

* Mike Stefanik, winner of record-tying nine NASCAR championships

* Curtis Turner, early personality, called the “Babe Ruth of stock car racing”

* Joe Weatherly, two-time NASCAR premier series champion

* Rex White, 1960 NASCAR premier series champion

* Robert Yates, won NASCAR premier series championship as both an engine builder and owner

The five nominees for the inaugural Landmark Award are:

* H. Clay Earles, founder of Martinsville Speedway

* Anne Bledsoe France, helped build the sport with husband Bill France Sr. Affectionately known as “Annie B.,” she is the first woman to be nominated for induction into the NASCAR Hall of Fame

* Raymond Parks, NASCAR’s first champion car owner

* Ralph Seagraves, formed groundbreaking Winston-NASCAR partnership as executive with R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company

* Ken Squier, legendary radio and television broadcaster; inaugural winner/namesake of Squier-Hall Award for NASCAR Media Excellence

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IndyCar 2017 driver review: Ed Carpenter

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MotorSportsTalk continues its annual review of the Verizon IndyCar Series drivers that raced in 2017. The 2017 season behind the wheel was better for Ed Carpenter than either of the last two years, but still wasn’t ideal results-wise in his six oval starts.

Ed Carpenter, No. 20 Ed Carpenter Racing Chevrolet

  • 2016: 25th Place (5 Starts), Best Finish 18th, Best Start 5th, 0 Top-5, 0 Top-10, 1 Lap Led, 11.2 Avg. Start, 21.8 Avg. Finish
  • 2017: 22nd Place (6 Starts), Best Finish 7th, Best Start 2nd, 0 Top-5, 1 Top-10, 5 Laps Led, 11.3 Avg. Start, 12.3 Avg. Finish

Ed Carpenter’s 2017 season was largely one of frustration, both behind the wheel and as a team owner.

While a respectable turnaround in results occurred – Carpenter finished between seventh and 12th in five of his six oval races after a nightmare season of ending 18th or worse in each of his 2016 starts – this is still not what he sets out to strive for in the races he does. Lost opportunities loomed larger than any official result he or the Ed Carpenter Racing team achieved.

Carpenter and new teammate JR Hildebrand, in for the departed Josef Newgarden, dominated preseason testing in Phoenix but Hildebrand could only muster third in the race, Carpenter a season-best seventh. Then at Indianapolis, Carpenter (second) and Hildebrand (sixth) flew the flag for Chevrolet in qualifying and practice pace, but they fell to 11th and 16th on race day owing to a front-wing change and late-race penalty for passing before a restart.

Both drivers got collected in incidents at Texas. Hildebrand qualified and finished a season-best second in Iowa but that result came only after the ECR crew rebuilt his car from a crash in practice. Then Carpenter had a practice crash in Pocono and despite a rapid rebuild, they missed the clock to qualify by mere minutes and were unable to do so. Carpenter’s spin on a slick Gateway track at the start of the race sent him over Will Power’s nose assembly in one of the scarier looking incidents of the year, although fortunately he was OK.

In a similar refrain as we often write, it’s not that Carpenter’s lost his ability to drive and he remains one of the series’ savviest and smartest people in the paddock. There have been a lot of extenuating circumstances of late, and it almost felt as though this team had “empty nest” components. Since September, Carpenter has had to secure his team’s future with a move away from its Speedway, Ind. shop, line up Spencer Pigot for a full-time drive replacing Hildebrand in the No. 21 car, find a new road/street course driver in the No. 20 car, and manage both driving and owning himself.