Daytona 500 update: Rain has stopped, track expected to be dry by 8:30 p.m. ET

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UPDATE: 7:15 p.m. ET: The rain has finally stopped at Daytona International Speedway. NASCAR has its AirTitan dryers on the track and the media has been informed that it is hoped the track will be dry and race-ready by about 8:30 p.m. ET. That does not mean the race will resume at that time, but it’s a good indicator that the green flag could fall shortly thereafter. More updates to follow as they become available.

UPDATE: 5:25 p.m. ET: The tornado warning issued by the National Weather Service for Volusia County, Fla., including Daytona Beach and Daytona International Speedway, has expired (at 5:15 p.m. ET). As recently as 4:45 p.m. ET, quarter-sized hail was falling in the Orlando area, about 50 miles southwest of DIS. But it is expected that particular storm cell will head south towards the area of Edgewater, Fla. As for DIS, it is still raining lightly, but AirTitan dryers are attempting to dry the track along with more conventional jet dryers. Neither NASCAR nor DIS officials have indicated when — or if — racing may resume tonight.

UPDATE: 4:26 p.m. ET: The National Weather Service has extended the tornado warning for Volusia County until 5:15 p.m. ET. Current conditions at Daytona International Speedway are light rain with heavy overcast.

UPDATE, 3:12 p.m. ET: The National Weather Service has reissued a tornado warning for Volusia County, which includes Daytona International Speedway, until 4 p.m. ET. Track and NASCAR officials have informed fans that a warning has been issued.

UPDATE, 3:05 p.m. ET: A tornado warning was issued for Volusia County, which includes Daytona International Speedway, but it has expired at 2:45 pm. Weather radar continues to show a long front of thunderstorms — including several heavy cells — that stretch all across the top of Florida and past the Panhandle.

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. – The Daytona 500 has been red-flagged by rain.

The Great American Race was stopped after 38 laps of the 200-mile race. A large band of thunderstorms is moving through the area.

The delay could take a while as the storm band on weather radar stretches back almost across the entire state of Florida.

If racing resumes but returns later, the race would have to get through 101 laps — just one lap past halfway — to be deemed official by NASCAR officials.

The red comes after the second caution of the race past Lap 31, caused when Martin Truex Jr.’s engine let go on his No. 78 Furniture Row Racing Chevrolet, and additional fluid was found down on the track.

In the opening 30 laps, five drivers exchanged the lead for five lead changes. Kyle Busch leads now; brother Kurt Busch has led the most laps thus far in his Stewart-Haas Racing debut.

Polesitter Austin Dillon led the opening lap before fading back, with Denny Hamlin, winner of the two other Speedweeks races thus far, then took over the point.

Kyle Larson hit the wall early, and spun later on, in what’s been a fraught Daytona 500 debut thus far.

After the first caution for Larson’s spin on Lap 23, the first round of pit stops featured drama for Matt Kenseth as he was spun into his pit stall. The two-time Daytona 500 champion was facing the wrong direction after what appeared to be contact from Trevor Bayne.

Meanwhile, Richard Petty’s driver, Marcos Ambrose, made very slight contact leaving his pit with of all people, Danica Patrick.

Kurt Busch took the lead off the pit sequence, and exchanged the lead with Hamlin and Paul Menard on the Lap 27 restart. Brother Kyle took over the point several laps later.

At the red, the top 10 order is Kyle Busch, Kasey Kahne, Hamlin, Brian Vickers, Menard, Brad Keselowski, Jeff Gordon, Joey Logano, Ricky Stenhouse Jr. and Dillon. Kurt Busch has dropped to 11th.

More updates to come.

Follow me @JerryBonkowski

F1 2017 driver review: Lance Stroll

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Team: Williams

Car No.: 18
Races: 20
Wins: 0
Podiums: 1
Best Finish: P3 (Azerbaijan)
Pole Positions: 0
Fastest Laps: 0
Points: 40
Championship Position: 13th

Lance Stroll’s arrival in Formula 1 at the start of the 2017 was a far from smooth one despite a significant private testing program being undertaken in the months leading up to his grand prix debut.

Even with older hand Felipe Massa at Williams, Stroll looked uneasy behind the wheel of the FW40 car through the opening run of races as he failed to reach the checkered flag in any of his first three starts.

The Canadian was left deflated after his first decent effort in Bahrain was cut short after a clash with Carlos Sainz Jr., calling it his “rock bottom” moment – but things would turn around on home soil.

Stroll produced a stunning fight through the field to take an excellent P9 in Canada, proving his talent seen in Formula 3 the previous year and shushing many of his critics.

Better would follow two weeks later in Baku when Stroll became the youngest rookie in F1 history to score a podium, dodging a crazy race to finish third. It would have been second had he not lost a drag race against Valtteri Bottas to the line.

Stroll’s form then fluctuated greatly. He was sublime on occasion, the best examples being Monza, when he started a remarkable P2 on the grid and ended as the top midfielder in P7, or Mexico where he took a brilliant sixth.

But there were too many weekends he was a little anonymous. Sure, Williams didn’t have the best car this year, but perhaps a little better was expected from Stroll.

2018 will be an even bigger challenge as he looks to the lead the team when a new teammate arrives – and at only 19, it is a lot to handle. Nevertheless, there are positive signs to be found; you just need to look for them a little.

Season High: Taking a shock podium in Baku after dodging chaos in front.

Season Low: A poor opening two races in Australia and China.