Daytona 500 update: Rain has stopped, track expected to be dry by 8:30 p.m. ET

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UPDATE: 7:15 p.m. ET: The rain has finally stopped at Daytona International Speedway. NASCAR has its AirTitan dryers on the track and the media has been informed that it is hoped the track will be dry and race-ready by about 8:30 p.m. ET. That does not mean the race will resume at that time, but it’s a good indicator that the green flag could fall shortly thereafter. More updates to follow as they become available.

UPDATE: 5:25 p.m. ET: The tornado warning issued by the National Weather Service for Volusia County, Fla., including Daytona Beach and Daytona International Speedway, has expired (at 5:15 p.m. ET). As recently as 4:45 p.m. ET, quarter-sized hail was falling in the Orlando area, about 50 miles southwest of DIS. But it is expected that particular storm cell will head south towards the area of Edgewater, Fla. As for DIS, it is still raining lightly, but AirTitan dryers are attempting to dry the track along with more conventional jet dryers. Neither NASCAR nor DIS officials have indicated when — or if — racing may resume tonight.

UPDATE: 4:26 p.m. ET: The National Weather Service has extended the tornado warning for Volusia County until 5:15 p.m. ET. Current conditions at Daytona International Speedway are light rain with heavy overcast.

UPDATE, 3:12 p.m. ET: The National Weather Service has reissued a tornado warning for Volusia County, which includes Daytona International Speedway, until 4 p.m. ET. Track and NASCAR officials have informed fans that a warning has been issued.

UPDATE, 3:05 p.m. ET: A tornado warning was issued for Volusia County, which includes Daytona International Speedway, but it has expired at 2:45 pm. Weather radar continues to show a long front of thunderstorms — including several heavy cells — that stretch all across the top of Florida and past the Panhandle.

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. – The Daytona 500 has been red-flagged by rain.

The Great American Race was stopped after 38 laps of the 200-mile race. A large band of thunderstorms is moving through the area.

The delay could take a while as the storm band on weather radar stretches back almost across the entire state of Florida.

If racing resumes but returns later, the race would have to get through 101 laps — just one lap past halfway — to be deemed official by NASCAR officials.

The red comes after the second caution of the race past Lap 31, caused when Martin Truex Jr.’s engine let go on his No. 78 Furniture Row Racing Chevrolet, and additional fluid was found down on the track.

In the opening 30 laps, five drivers exchanged the lead for five lead changes. Kyle Busch leads now; brother Kurt Busch has led the most laps thus far in his Stewart-Haas Racing debut.

Polesitter Austin Dillon led the opening lap before fading back, with Denny Hamlin, winner of the two other Speedweeks races thus far, then took over the point.

Kyle Larson hit the wall early, and spun later on, in what’s been a fraught Daytona 500 debut thus far.

After the first caution for Larson’s spin on Lap 23, the first round of pit stops featured drama for Matt Kenseth as he was spun into his pit stall. The two-time Daytona 500 champion was facing the wrong direction after what appeared to be contact from Trevor Bayne.

Meanwhile, Richard Petty’s driver, Marcos Ambrose, made very slight contact leaving his pit with of all people, Danica Patrick.

Kurt Busch took the lead off the pit sequence, and exchanged the lead with Hamlin and Paul Menard on the Lap 27 restart. Brother Kyle took over the point several laps later.

At the red, the top 10 order is Kyle Busch, Kasey Kahne, Hamlin, Brian Vickers, Menard, Brad Keselowski, Jeff Gordon, Joey Logano, Ricky Stenhouse Jr. and Dillon. Kurt Busch has dropped to 11th.

More updates to come.

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‘Still quite early’ for Ricciardo to think about Red Bull F1 future

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Daniel Ricciardo feels it is “still quite early” to make a decision about his Red Bull Formula 1 future despite seeing teammate Max Verstappen announce on Friday he would be staying with the team until 2020.

Verstappen, 20, put pen to paper on an enhanced F1 contract with Red Bull, with his previous deal due to expire at the end of next season in parallel to Ricciardo’s own agreement.

Ricciardo was asked following practice on Friday why he is yet to strike a new deal for himself with Red Bull, and explained he is in no rush to make a final decision when he has over a year to run on his current contract.

“It’s not that I’ve said no to anything. It’s just still quite early I think,” Ricciardo explained.

“People talked a little bit about contracts and the silly season for next year, but I thought that would still happen next year. It’s still quite early.

“If I’m to try and extract some positives out of his news it’s that it gives us good confidence for next year. He and his management see a lot of positives in the team to continue like that.

“I’m 100 per cent here next year, I can at least say that, and I think it gives both of us confidence that we’ll keep progressing the way we are.”

Red Bull said upon announcing Verstappen’s new deal that it wants to “build a team around him”, with the 20-year-old standing out as a once-in-a-generation talent.

The focus surrounding Verstappen has not left Ricciardo feeling as though he is in the shade or in any way playing second-fiddle to the Dutchman, stressing he has no internal concerns at Red Bull.

“For sure, as far as media goes, he certainly gets a lot of attention. He’s broken records for his age and things like that, so rightly so,” Ricciardo said.

“Take the media out of it, as far as inside the team, new parts on the car, things like this, there’s always been parity and equality.”

Verstappen is only the third driver to commit to a deal beyond the end of next season, following Sebastian Vettel at Ferrari and Fernando Alonso at McLaren on multi-year contracts.

All 10 F1 teams have at least one free seat for 2019, making Ricciardo a possible candidate for seats with either Mercedes or Ferrari were he to consider a move away from Red Bull.

Speaking to British broadcaster Sky Sports, Red Bull F1 advisor Helmut Marko said he felt Ricciardo was “putting himself on the market” by waiting to make a decision on his future, but that talks would take place when possible.