Out of the bubble, back on the grind

Leave a comment

This February was different for me.

At this time of the year, I’m usually contemplating over who wins the Daytona 500, which F1 teams get their ducks in a row during testing, and what benefits IndyCar sees exactly in having a five or six-month off-season (that one is a toughie).

But this February, I was more concerned with Adelina Sotnikova shocking the figure skating world, good guy David Wise making Olympic history in ski halfpipe, and the trials and tribulations of furry mascots.

I immersed myself inside the bubble that was the XXII Olympic Winter Games, with only a few reminders of my usual duties: Namely, my colleague Tony DiZinno fulfilling my requests for updates on any racing bits I’d missed, and NBC IndyCar/F1 voice Leigh Diffey calling all the sliding sports at Sochi.

But the bubble’s been popped. The Olympics are over. And now, I’m back on the grind here at MST.

So it goes for yours truly…And so it goes for NASCAR as well.

Their bubble, of course, was Daytona Speedweeks and its climax was the Daytona 500. It may not have had massive production numbers or crying bears, but it still produced a memorable result (not to mention one of the oddest social media episodes in NASCAR history).

In the end, it was Dale Earnhardt Jr., who went one step beyond his late, beloved father by claiming a second Daytona 500 – thrilling everyone from Junior Nation to the executives in Daytona Beach.

The win comes at a critical time for NASCAR, which has had to deal with attendance and ratings woes in recent years and, quite frankly, needs its biggest star to morph into a regular winner ahead of the new (and improved?) Chase for the Sprint Cup it concocted over the off-season.

But NASCAR’s biggest show of the year is over. And now, it’s time to see how Earnhardt fares on the grind that begins this weekend at Phoenix International Raceway.

One figures that with Earnhardt effectively in the new Chase thanks to the win, we’ll see a less burdened competitor that’s more willing to take a chance or two. That could lead to more success at Phoenix, a track that may not pop into your mind as one of “his places” but a track where he rattled off a fifth and a fourth in 2013.

Besides Earnhardt, you figure competitors such as Kevin Harvick (a winner at PIR in two of the last three races there), Carl Edwards (the PIR spring race winner from one year ago), and Jimmie Johnson (six Top-5s in his last eight races there) will have their say in the outcome.

But a shake-up could be in the cards in Phoenix as well with the introduction of NASCAR’s new knockout-style qualifying format. Since Phoenix is a one-mile track, competitors will have a two-round format this weekend: The Top 12 fastest speeds advance from the 30-minute opening round to battle for the pole position in the second round.

In summary, Phoenix is where we’ll start to see the true contenders emerge. The bubble of Daytona is gone.

Now, it gets real.

Audi bids farewell to Dr. Wolfgang Ullrich upon retirement

Audi Sport
Leave a comment

Audi bid farewell to its iconic head of motorsport, Dr. Wolfgang Ullrich, at its end-of-season ‘Race Night’ event in Germany on Friday upon his retirement.

Ullrich took over the reins as Audi’s head of motorsport in 1993 and stayed in the role for 23 years, overseeing its arrival in the prototype class of sports car racing and domination of the 24 Hours of Le Mans.

Ullrich stepped down from the position at the end of 2016, handing the reins over to ex-Audi DTM chief Dieter Gass, and attended his final racing event with the German marque at its first works Formula E outing in Hong Kong earlier this month.

Ullrich was honored at the Race Night event on Friday and thanked for his efforts in developing Audi into a force within global motorsport.

“In 566 factory-backed commitments during this period he celebrated 209 victories, 13 of them in the 24 Hours of Le Mans, eleven in the 12-hour race at Sebring and nine in the ‘Petit Le Mans’ at Road Atlanta,” a piece on Ullrich’s tenure for Audi’s website reads.

“31 driver titles in super touring car racing, in the DTM and in the sports prototype category are credited to him. 57 campaigners were Audi factory drivers during Wolfgang Ullrich’s era and he was responsible for 18 new developments of racing cars – an impressive tally.”