Cup stars driving into the unknown with new qualifying format

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Before practice got underway today at Phoenix International Raceway, multiple Sprint Cup stars were unable to come up with an answer on what they’d expect with this evening’s debut of NASCAR’s new knock-out qualifying format.

The multi-round structure of the format isn’t the only aspect causing them to ponder things, but there’s also the matter of having just one set of tires to use throughout qualifying and the roles that strategy and teammates could wind up having as well.

Four-time Cup champion Jeff Gordon recognized the new format’s potential for boosting interest in qualifying, but admitted that “it’s the unknowns that we fear the most right now.”

“I think for that first session, it’s going to be about getting a clean lap,” he said. “The ability to have a lot of cars out there trying to make laps, it’s kind of going to be like practice making qualifying runs except for everybody is in qualifying trim…Coordination between the spotter and the driver and the crew of making that first clean run – I think really two or three laps seems to be best here with sticker tires and pressures up, but you’re definitely going to be able to make a second run if need be.

“The bigger challenge there comes with cooling. We have no way of cooling the car other than pulling the tape off and going out and driving around with no tape on, which I think that is going to be tough to pull off.”

As for Daytona 500 winner and points leader Dale Earnhardt Jr., he tried to get himself down to brass tacks on the matter, declaring that his job was “to go out there, find a clean place on the race track and run the best lap you can run.”

“I don’t know exactly what [crew chief] Steve’s [Letarte] plan is, but we have a lot of time in between practice and qualifying to sort that out and get an idea of what the rumblings are in the garage,” he said. “You know people are talking and all kinds of information is moving around in that garage to try to capture. We will see what makes sense.”

As for Ryan Newman, he believes that the new format will transform qualifying into more of a team event.

“Ultimately, I think we’re still going to have a pole winner; now the team is more incorporated with the things that are going on and the adjustments that you make,” he said.

“The spotter has a job with respect to qualifying that he never had before. But I think it all adds up to a team qualifying event more so than just a driver versus a race track qualifying format.”

FIA returns Manor’s F1 entry fee for 2017

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Good news: Manor Grand Prix Racing Limited got a refund of an entry fee it paid to the FIA to run in this year’s F1 season.

Bad news: Manor still hasn’t run this year, and won’t be for the foreseeable future (especially as Manor’s former leadership staff is moving that team into FIA WEC’s new-look LMP1 class in addition to its LMP2 program).

Manor Group’s receivership outfit, Just Racing Services Limited, went into administration earlier this year. As there was no new buyer for the F1 team, Manor dropped from the 2017 grid before the season.

The FIA said it would return its entry fee to help Manor Group pay off outstanding debts.

It basically means nothing in the grand scheme of things since Manor missed out on 10th place in the constructor’s standings in 2016 and fell from the F1 grid as a result, but hey, it’s a goodwill gesture going into Thanksgiving this week.