Kevin Harvick wants more SAFER barriers to fill in unprotected voids at Sprint Cup tracks

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Kevin Harvick has never been shy about speaking his mind, especially when it comes to his safety and that of his fellow competitors.

During his media session Friday at Phoenix International Raceway, Harvick made it clear that he wants to see more racetracks further expand installation of SAFER barriers.

While all Sprint Cup tracks have the speed absorbing barriers, several do not have them completely around both outside and inside retaining walls.

Harvick slid through the infield grass and hit hard into an inside retaining wall that was not protected by a SAFER barrier during last Sunday’s Daytona 500 at Daytona International Speedway. Although he was uninjured, Harvick did suffer soreness and just started feeling better Friday from the lick.

“The tracks, for the most part, don’t listen to really anything unless it’s profitable for their shareholders,” Harvick said. “So, when you see somebody spending $400 million dollars on their track and they don’t have soft walls around the inside, maybe they could spend $403 million to go ahead and finish the inside of the superspeedway there at Daytona.

“Yeah, I was sore all week. And just today I feel good enough to do what I need to do.”

Several other drivers have had similar hard wrecks into inside retaining walls that haven’t been protected by SAFER barriers at other tracks in recent seasons, including Jeff Gordon, Danica Patrick and Denny Hamlin.

Hamlin suffered a serious back injury in his particular wreck last spring when his Toyota crashed into an unprotected inside retaining wall at Auto Club Speedway. The wreck forced him to miss four weeks of the Sprint Cup schedule.

Harvick had absolutely no control of his No. 4 Stewart Haas Racing Chevrolet at the time of Sunday’s wreck.

“It was just a weird situation,” Harvick said. “The car didn’t have any brakes or any steering and the throttle was partially hung coming off the wall and going through the wet grass and then into no SAFER barrier at the end of pit road there.

“So, it was a hard shot. It’s a little bit frustrating because it really shouldn’t even be a debate. I know they have data that shows where the most frequently hit spots are but we wear all this safety equipment and do all the things that we do to these race tracks for that one freak incident to keep things from happening like happened back in 2001 (when Dale Earnhardt was killed in a last-lap crash at Daytona International Speedway).”

Harvick succeeded the late Earnhardt in what became the No. 29 Chevrolet for Richard Childress Racing.

“It shouldn’t even be a debate,” Harvick said. “It’s just one of those things I guess that you just wait around for something else to happen and then they’ll fix it.”

DIS spokesman Lenny Santiago issued a statement in response to Harvick’s comments.

“Fan and competitor safety is a top priority at Daytona International Speedway,” Santiago said in the statement. “We work closely with NASCAR, the Motorsports Technology Group, and the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and its Midwest Roadside Safety Facility division on recommendations for placement of the SAFER Barriers. We continuously review incidents that take place with these experts, and make improvements based on their ongoing recommendations.”

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F1 2017 driver review: Lance Stroll

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Team: Williams

Car No.: 18
Races: 20
Wins: 0
Podiums: 1
Best Finish: P3 (Azerbaijan)
Pole Positions: 0
Fastest Laps: 0
Points: 40
Championship Position: 13th

Lance Stroll’s arrival in Formula 1 at the start of the 2017 was a far from smooth one despite a significant private testing program being undertaken in the months leading up to his grand prix debut.

Even with older hand Felipe Massa at Williams, Stroll looked uneasy behind the wheel of the FW40 car through the opening run of races as he failed to reach the checkered flag in any of his first three starts.

The Canadian was left deflated after his first decent effort in Bahrain was cut short after a clash with Carlos Sainz Jr., calling it his “rock bottom” moment – but things would turn around on home soil.

Stroll produced a stunning fight through the field to take an excellent P9 in Canada, proving his talent seen in Formula 3 the previous year and shushing many of his critics.

Better would follow two weeks later in Baku when Stroll became the youngest rookie in F1 history to score a podium, dodging a crazy race to finish third. It would have been second had he not lost a drag race against Valtteri Bottas to the line.

Stroll’s form then fluctuated greatly. He was sublime on occasion, the best examples being Monza, when he started a remarkable P2 on the grid and ended as the top midfielder in P7, or Mexico where he took a brilliant sixth.

But there were too many weekends he was a little anonymous. Sure, Williams didn’t have the best car this year, but perhaps a little better was expected from Stroll.

2018 will be an even bigger challenge as he looks to the lead the team when a new teammate arrives – and at only 19, it is a lot to handle. Nevertheless, there are positive signs to be found; you just need to look for them a little.

Season High: Taking a shock podium in Baku after dodging chaos in front.

Season Low: A poor opening two races in Australia and China.