F1 2014 Primer: The Teams

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In the penultimate part of MotorSportsTalk’s F1 2014 season preview, we take a look at the teams that will be vying for this year’s world championship. Although there are no new additions, we do have a number of driver changes, plus some interesting changes in suppliers and staff that could make a big difference in 2014.

RED BULL RACING

Having dominated F1 since the middle of 2009, it might come as a shock that Red Bull is no longer the team to beat. If testing is anything to go by, the RB10 car is proving to be troublesome. The only major change at the team is the arrival of Daniel Ricciardo as Mark Webber’s replacement, and he may be better poised to challenge Sebastian Vettel with the new regulations. Don’t write Red Bull off though: the team has a knack for rapid improvement.

MERCEDES

Mercedes was undoubtedly the team to beat during pre-season testing, and has a strong driver pairing in Lewis Hamilton and Nico Rosberg. Upon re-entering the sport in 2010, the German marque always earmarked 2014 as being its first year of wanting to fight for the title; such a long lead-up and preparation period can only aid the team’s efforts. Ross Brawn’s departure may be felt, but with Toto Wolff and Paddy Lowe at the helm, Mercedes appears to be in good shape.

SCUDERIA FERRARI

The Italian prancing horse hopes to bounce back in 2014 after a period of regular disappointment. Although there have been race wins and fine efforts from Fernando Alonso, it is still seven years since the team last won the drivers’ championship with Kimi Raikkonen. For 2014 though, the Finn returns after leaving Lotus, creating a mouthwatering driver line-up. In terms of one-lap pace, the team may even challenge Mercedes, and could yet be a force to be reckoned with in F1 this season.

LOTUS

No team has undergone more change than Lotus over the winter. The departures of James Allison, Dirk de Beer, Ciaron Pilbeam, Eric Boullier and Kimi Raikkonen mean that the team enters 2014 far, far weaker than it was twelve months ago. Pastor Maldonado arrives and may provide some financial stability, but after missing one of the three tests, the team is certainly on the back foot, especially with the Renault engine being problematic. Romain Grosjean will hope to lead the team in the post-Raikkonen era.

MCLAREN

Coming off of the back of its worst season since 1980, McLaren is a team in transition. 2014 marks its final year with Mercedes engines before a switch to Honda, but many changes have already been made. Kevin Magnussen comes in to replace Sergio Perez, Ron Dennis returns as CEO and Eric Boullier arrives as Racing Director. The latter has replaced Martin Whitmarsh, of whom we are yet to hear news on. With Jenson Button hungry for a second title, the team could yet bounce back in fashion this year.

FORCE INDIA

Having dumped the rather underwhelming line-up of Paul di Resta and Adrian Sutil, Nico Hulkenberg (ever the nearly-man) and Sergio Perez (having left McLaren) arrive at Force India. Powered by Mercedes, the team appears to be well-placed for a strong season, so much so that Bernie Ecclestone has tipped Vijay Mallya’s team to win its first race this year. Hulkenberg and Perez are two exciting prospects, so it could be a big year for all at Force India.

SAUBER

Moving in the opposite direction to Hulkenberg, Adrian Sutil arrives at Sauber to partner Esteban Gutierrez as Sauber looks to bounce back from a tough 2013. The financial problems have been resolved, whilst the C33 has ran well during testing. The team may not win races, but it is certainly in better shape than it was at this time last year. With an array of drivers waiting in the wings for seats, the pressure is on Sutil and Gutierrez (2013’s rookie of the year) to perform.

SCUDERIA TORO ROSSO

Change is afoot at Toro Rosso. Following Daniel Ricciardo’s promotion to Red Bull, 19-year-old Daniil Kvyat was a surprise choice as his replacement, fending off Antonio Felix da Costa and Carlos Sainz Jr. to win the seat. Jean-Eric Vergne will become the team’s most experienced driver ever in 2014, but he knows that time is ticking. The move to Renault engines may have backfired, but in Xevi Pujolar, the team has secured a greatly talented engineer.

WILLIAMS MARTINI RACING

After scoring just five points in 2013, a raft of changes have been made at Williams. Gone are many of the problems that blighted last season, including Pastor Maldonado who accused the team of sabotage in Austin. Felipe Massa’s arrival is a win-win situation for driver and team, whilst engineers Jakob Andreasen and Rob Smedley will be keen to work with Pat Symonds in his first full season. Throw in Valtteri Bottas’ huge potential, Mercedes engines and the newly-announced Martini backing, and the stage is set for a breakthrough year at Williams.

MARUSSIA

Having finally beaten Caterham in 2013, Marussia enters the new season hopeful of a repeat performance, and perhaps some points. Ferrari engines will certainly aid the efforts of Max Chilton and Jules Bianchi, whilst the possibility for races of attrition could create a big opportunity for the Anglo-Russian outfit. Relying the race goes ahead as planned, the team will also enjoy its inaugural ‘home’ grand prix at Sochi in October.

CATERHAM

All change at Caterham in 2014 as Giedo van der Garde and Charles Pic make way for fan favorite Kamui Kobayashi and GP2’s Marcus Ericsson, with the latter becoming the first Swede to race in F1 since Stefan Johansson in 1991. With a new mint image and a thirst for revenge after being marginally beaten by Marussia last season, 2014 could be a big year for Caterham and everyone at Leafield.

 

More of MotorSportsTalk’s 2014 F1 season preview
F1 2014 Primer: The Drivers
F1 2014 Primer: The Tracks
5 storylines that could define the 2014 F1 season

Maverick Vinales takes Qatar MotoGP pole as qualifying is rained off

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Maverick Viñales will make his Yamaha MotoGP debut from pole position after qualifying at Qatar’s Losail International Circuit was rained off on Saturday evening.

Viñales claimed his maiden MotoGP race win last year with Suzuki, prompting a move to Yamaha in place of three-time champion Jorge Lorenzo, who made a switch to Ducati.

After impressing throughout pre-season testing, Viñales laid down an early marker in Qatar by setting the pace in practice.

His performances would prove key as rain on Saturday in Qatar forced officials to cancel qualifying, leading them to combine the times from practice to form the grid.

Viñales’ time of 1:54.316 from FP1 handed him his first MotoGP pole by half a second from Suzuki replacement Andrea Iannone, while defending world champion Marc Marquez will start third for Honda.

2015 and 2016 Moto2 champion Johann Zarco will make his MotoGP debut from fourth on the grid, with Ducati’s Andrea Dovizioso fifth ahead of Scott Redding.

Nine-time world champion Valentino Rossi will begin his search for a 10th title from P10 on the grid, two places ahead of perennial rival Lorenzo, whose Ducati debut will come from P12.

Sauber super-sub Giovinazzi stars in maiden F1 qualifying, takes 16th

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Sauber’s last-minute substitute Antonio Giovinazzi turned in one of the performances of Formula 1 qualifying for the Australian Grand Prix on Saturday by claiming 16th on the grid for his maiden grand prix.

Ferrari youngster Giovinazzi was drafted in by Sauber for FP3 and qualifying after Pascal Wehrlein was deemed unfit amid ongoing issues with his back following a crash at the Race of Champions in January that left him with a minor injury.

Giovinazzi was notified on Friday night that he would be replacing Wehrlein for the remainder of the weekend, but did not find out until Saturday morning as he had already gone to bed.

Despite getting less than an hour of track running in which to get to grips with the tricky Albert Park circuit, Giovinazzi starred in qualifying to finish 16th, narrowly missing out on a Q2 berth and ending up just a couple of tenths off experienced teammate Marcus Ericsson.

“That is a special day for me kicking off my first Formula 1 grand prix weekend,” Giovinazzi said after the session.

“I am really happy with my performance today, I was just a few tenths away from Q2.

“It will be a long race tomorrow; a lot can happen here in Melbourne. I will do my best to put in my maximum performance.”

The call from Sauber capped off a rollercoaster five months for Giovinazzi that started with a bitter defeat in the GP2 title race to Red Bull youngster Pierre Gasly at the end of November in Abu Dhabi.

Giovinazzi was then contacted by Ferrari and offered a deal to become its reserve driver for 2017, leading to a private test in its 2015-spec car at Fiorano.

When Wehrlein was declared unfit for the first pre-season test in Barcelona, Giovinazzi was drafted in by Sauber for two days’ worth of running, preparing him for the shock call-up in Melbourne.

Giovinazzi will become the first Italian driver to start a race since Jarno Trulli and Vitantonio Liuzzi on Sunday, the pair making their final F1 appearances at the 2011 Brazilian Grand Prix for Caterham and HRT respectively.

A lasting legacy: Eric Medlen’s death spurred NHRA safety gains

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GAINESVILLE, Fla. (AP) John Medlen remembers his son’s final seconds like they were his first steps.

Eric Medlen inched his dragster to the starting line and waited for the signal. John, also his son’s crew chief, made a couple of routine checks, looked in Eric’s eyes, gave him a thumbs-up and pounded on the hood twice.

“Neither one of us realized he had a little less than three seconds to live,” John said.

Ten years after Eric’s fatal practice run at Gainesville Raceway, home to one of professional drag racing’s premier events, John is still dealing with the demons that come from burying a child. Eric’s death became a defining moment for NHRA, mostly because of the way John reacted to it and the safety changes he fought for.

“Eric would not want anybody here on this earth that’s left to be burdened to the point where you can’t live your life because of his death,” he said. “… I hear his spirit tell me all the time, `Keep going, Dad. Make these cars safe. Keep somebody else from having these kinds of issues.”‘

Eric grew up around racing in Oakdale, California. His father placed his bassinet on a workbench in his garage, and he spent hours at drag strips. Even the school bus dropped him off in front of dad’s race shop.

John Medlen has left John Force Racing to join rival Don Schumacher Racing. (Photo courtesy John Force Racing)

John steered his son toward other pursuits, and to an extent, that worked. Eric was a champion calf-roper in high school, then a mechanical engineering major in college.

But the track always beckoned. The man nicknamed “Duff” spent eight years working as a John Force Racing crewmember before the team gave him his big break as a driver in 2004.

“I tried to talk him out of it, but he wasn’t going to have it,” John said. “If it had wheels, he was going to race it. Go karts, sprint cars, it didn’t matter what it was.”

Eric won six times in 72 starts in the National Hot Rod Association and finished in the top five in points in each of his three years at the pro level. His death shocked the series, even if everyone associated with it knew the perils.

Drag racing has always been one of the most dangerous forms of motorsports, whether it’s on backroads, city streets or professional strips. It became increasingly popular in the 1950s: Bigger engines, lighter cars, faster speeds – and increased risk.

Eric reached the top level, where nitromethane-powered dragsters race in side-by-side lanes and routinely top 300 mph in less than five seconds.

“You know what can happen. Everybody in the industry knows what can happen,” John said. “But we’ve never seen an injury like Eric’s before.”

On March 19, 2007, a day after the NHRA’s Gatornationals, Eric and his Force teammates stuck around to test at the historic track, a common move that allows teams to acquire valuable data while reducing travel costs.

As Eric, 33, pulled to the starting line, everything seemed normal. He released the trans brake, allowing his Funny Car to lunge down the track with the G-forces of a fighter jet. And in the blink of an eye, Eric endured a violent, mid-strip tire shake that snapped the chassis, caused his car to slide out of control and forced his head to whip side to side about 150 times. Goodyear later said something apparently punctured the tire at high speed, causing it to lose pressure and start jerking the entire car with more than 40,000 pounds of force.

John rushed to the crumpled car as it came to a stop against a concrete retaining wall, found Eric unconscious in the cockpit and started yelling at him to breathe. John could tell the wreck was bad. Then he saw a paramedic shine a flashlight into Eric’s eyes, turn to a colleague with a look of desperation and try again.

“I’ll never forget,” John said. “She threw that flashlight into the corner of the ambulance. You could tell this was serious.”

Eric’s head swelled so much because of a traumatic brain injury that he was hardly recognizable in his hospital bed. Doctors worked around the clock trying to relieve pressure and improve blood flow to his brain.

Despite the aggressive treatment, Eric’s body lost the ability to manage its salt and water levels.

After four days with no improvement, the decision was made to take Eric off life support.

He died immediately.

“People were mourning, people were hurt, people were dying inside,” said team owner John Force, who stayed at the hospital with Eric’s family. “But they also were already thinking about moving ahead. They weren’t going to let this happen again.”

Force’s cars skipped the next race, and he canceled the reality TV show “Driving Force,” which focused on him and his three drag-racing daughters.

“We’re not going back to making movies,” Force said. “We’re going to learn how to build race cars.”

Eric’s father led the charge, meeting with NHRA executives, competitors, industry experts and even military and NASA engineers. They studied metal energy, seatbelts, tires, padding.

“As long as I’m on this earth, I’m not going to have Eric give his life in vain,” John said. “We’re the ones here that can make all that count for him and for his memory.”

Changes came quickly.

There were tighter tolerances for chromoly tubing used to build chassis. There were wider roll cages. There was thicker padding surrounding drivers’ helmets. There were now seven seat belt attachment points, keeping drivers more tightly harnessed for added stability and support.

John Medlen, 66, works for Don Schumacher Racing now. Returning to Gainesville every year is the hardest part of his life. Sights, sounds, smells, all come rushing back like the crash was a day – not a decade – ago. He welcomes questions about Eric’s triumphs and tragedy, mostly because they help remind him about the son he lost, the life they lived together and the reason he still works to make the series safer.

“It’s very difficult, but you have to do it,” John said. “You’ve got to face your adversaries and deal with the demons. They’re not going away.”

There have been a few NHRA deaths since Eric’s – Scott Kalitta (2008), Neal Parker (2010) and Mark Niver (2010) – but none of those were caused by tire shake.

Six months after Eric’s death, Force endured a similar tire shake during a race in Texas. The violent crash broke his left ankle, left wrist and several fingers and put a deep cut on his right knee. Force was airlifted to a nearby hospital, where he spent weeks before leaving in a wheelchair.

But the 16-time champion avoided any head trauma, which he attributed to the NHRA safety modifications put in place following Eric’s accident.

Force responded by erecting life-size statues of Eric at his team facility in Indiana, and at his corporate headquarters in California. He created museums to house Eric’s race cars.

He sees the impact they have on everyone, even his 5-year-old grandson.

“He pointed at the statue and goes, `What is that, Grandpa?'” Force recounted. “And I said, `That’s Eric Medlen. That’s the guy that saved your Grandpa’s life and I ain’t never forgetting that.”

More AP auto racing: http://www.racing.ap.org

Grosjean: ‘Unbelievable’ to score Haas’ best F1 qualifying result in Australia

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Romain Grosjean hailed Haas’ Formula 1 qualifying performance in Australia as “unbelievable” after picking up its best Saturday result since joining the grid.

NASCAR team co-owner Gene Haas took his eponymous operation into F1 last year, with Grosjean leading its charge through its debut campaign.

Haas enters its sophomore year in 2017 looking to build on its eighth-place finish in the constructors’ championship, and made a strong start in Australia on Saturday.

While new driver Kevin Magnussen dropped out in Q1 following an error on his hot lap, Grosjean was able to take Haas into Q3 before securing sixth place on the grid for Sunday’s season-opener.

The result marks Haas’ best qualifying result to date in F1, beating Grosjean’s run to P7 ahead of the Brazilian Grand Prix last November.

“It was quite an unbelievable qualifying session for us. It’s a shame that we didn’t get Kevin there, but the car is looking good, even better than what we’ve seen recently,” Grosjean said after the session.

“We’ve made some good progress over the weekend. There’s a lot more we can understand and analyze but, generally, it’s a great start for us.

“It’s always good to start with a strong qualifying session. It tells you that if you keep improving the car, you could be in a good place very soon. If that’s our baseline, and you can fight between sixth and 10th position, where it’s so tight, it would be great to be there most of the time and enjoy some good times.

“Tomorrow’s start is a big unknown. We’ve been practicing and some have been good, others not so much. Hopefully, we’ll get the first one right tomorrow.”

The Australian Grand Prix is live on NBCSN and the NBC Sports App from midnight ET.