William Clay Ford, last surviving grandson of Henry Ford, dies at 88

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The automotive, motorsports and pro football worlds are mourning the death of William Clay Ford, who passed away Sunday from pneumonia, according to a company statement.

Ford was 88 and the last surviving grandchild of the company’s founder, Henry Ford.

Ford spent 57 years with the 110-year-old company his grandfather built, most recently as Director Emeritus.

In a twist, he was elected to the company’s board of directors in 1948, a year before he graduated from Yale University and began actually working at Ford in 1949. He spent 32 years as chairman of Ford’s Design Committee, overseeing dozens of new car developments and oftentimes exotic concept cars.

He was credited with overseeing the development of a number of classic Ford vehicles, including the Continental Mark II, which many car enthusiasts consider among the most iconic vehicles ever manufactured.

He also championed Ford’s involvement in various forms of motorsports, including NASCAR, open-wheel racing, drag racing and other series both in the U.S. and internationally.

NASCAR chairman and CEO Brian France issued this statement on the passing of Ford after Sunday’s Kobalt 400 at Las Vegas Motor Speedway: “On behalf of the France family and everyone at NASCAR, our thoughts and prayers go out to the entire Ford family on the passing of William Clay Ford Sr. He was a worthy successor not only to a great company but also a legacy – and he served both exceptionally well. The grandson of Henry Ford will be remembered as a man of style, for both the automobiles he built and the life he led. He was a giant … who forever will be missed.”

Ford became chairman of Ford’s Executive Committee in 1978, was elected vice chairman of the Board in 1980 and chairman of the Finance Committee in 1987. He retired from his post as vice chairman in 1989 and as chairman of the Finance Committee in 1995. He retired from the board and was named Director Emeritus on May 12, 2005.

He is survived by his wife of 66 years, Martha Firestone Ford; daughters Martha Ford Morse (Peter), Sheila Ford Hamp (Steven), and Elizabeth Ford Kontulis (Charles); son William Clay Ford, Jr. (Lisa); 14 grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

William Clay Ford was named president of the Detroit Lions in 1961, purchased the team two years later for a reported $4.5 million (it’s now valued by Forbes at $900 million), and served as its chairman until his death.

“My father was a great business leader and humanitarian who dedicated his life to the company and the community,” William Clay Ford, Jr., executive chairman of Ford Motor Company, said in a statement released by the company. “He also was a wonderful family man, a loving husband, father, grandfather and great-grandfather. He will be greatly missed by everyone who knew him, yet he will continue to inspire us all.”

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MRTI: Telitz gets creative to help racing career

Photo: Indianapolis Motor Speedway, LLC Photography
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To say that Belardi Auto Racing’s Aaron Telitz has endured a difficult start to the 2018 Indy Lights Presented by Cooper Tires season would be an understatement. The Wisconsin native only completed four corners through the first three races – Races 1 and 2 at St. Petersburg, and Race 1 at Barber Motorsports Park – with St. Pete being especially problematic.

He took the pole for Race 1, but a crash during qualifying for Race 2 prevented him from actually starting. What’s more, the damage was so severe that the Belardi team needed a brand new chassis, with Telitz’s Dallara IL-15 damaged beyond repair.

They also had to borrow a car from Carlin for Race 2, but Telitz’s race ended after he got tangled up with Victor Franzoni in Turn 2 on Lap 1.

With the damage bill well into the six figures as a result, Telitz has taken to some unique, or rather, creative ways to raise money in the aftermath to help cover the costs. “Creative,” in this case, meaning Telitz is using his art skills.

An artist in his spare time, Telitz has begun selling his own original paintings to help raise money.

 “I’ve been to a lot of art shows and I see stuff and I go, ‘Holy cow, someone’s going to pay a thousand dollars for that thing?’” Telitz quipped in a story posted on the Milwaukee Journal.

In discussing his artistic abilities, Telitz added, “I’m working at getting better. I’d like to be able to paint some animals, those types of things. I got a request from Alexander Rossi to see if I could paint his dog. Unfortunately I can’t do that yet.”

Further, in a partnership with The Styled Garage, Telitz is selling his own merchandise, and accepting donations, to help his cause.

Telitz finished fourth in Race 2 at Barber on Sunday, and sits seventh in the Indy Lights championship, 59 points behind leader Pato O’Ward.

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