Kevin Harvick, Matt Kenseth among Bristol leaders that got in trouble

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A long list of race leaders in tonight’s Food City 500 at Bristol Motor Speedway wound up having their nights turn into something much less that what they were hoping for.

With 50 laps to go, a potential Top-10 for Kevin Harvick literally went up in flames when his already smoking No. 4 Stewart-Haas Racing Chevrolet slammed into the wall. The incident caused Jamie McMurray to check up and Brad Keselowski wound up slamming into the back of the Chip Ganassi Racing driver.

Harvick’s car then caught fire on its way to the garage, causing him to quickly climb out and leave the mess behind. McMurray retired from the race shortly afterwards, while Keselowski soldiered on without a hood to a 14th place finish.

All three drivers had led earlier in the race, with Harvick in particular coming on late to lead 28 laps. But they were far from the only leaders to suffer.

On Lap 394 of 500, Kyle Busch crashed while running 17th and forced cars to evade him on the inside and outside as his wrecked machine came to a stop in the middle of the backstretch.

One of those oncoming cars was Kurt Busch, who tried to go to the outside of Kyle but clipped the No. 18 Toyota instead. He then went into the backstretch wall.

Kyle and Kurt would finish 29th and 35th respectively after also leading earlier in the race. Kyle’s downfall was particularly noteworthy, as he had led a 73-lap portion in the middle stages and was the halfway leader as well.

But on Lap 272, Kyle sensed a problem and decided to pit under green. That decision cost him when the caution came out six laps later for a Ryan Truex crash that sent a piece of debris – a brake rotor – to be ultimately run over by Busch.

Busch went down two laps in the sequence, but took the wave-around to get within one lap of the leaders. He was still at that point when he crashed on Lap 394.

Then there was Matt Kenseth, who had an up-and-down day before finishing 13th.

Kenseth was the leader coming out of the three-hour, 19-minute red flag and held the point until Kurt Busch took it on Lap 153. Four laps later on Lap 157, Danica Patrick and Cole Whitt made contact that put Whitt in the wall.

As the caution lights turned on, Busch and Kenseth checked up for Whitt but Timmy Hill failed to slow down and plowed into the back of Kenseth.

Multiple repairs on pit road enabled Kenseth to stay on the lead lap though, and with the back of his car crumpled in, he rocketed from 29th all the way through the field and to the lead on Lap 285.

Kenseth would lead for a race-high 165 laps but late in the race, he suffered handling issues and fell back. Then with 92 laps to go, he tagged the wall after apparently running over debris with his tires.

He would continue on, but it was a disappointing ending to a night that had been largely positive.

Finally, Jimmie Johnson led 44 laps early in the race but on Lap 114, his right front tire unexpectedly went down and he lost multiple laps having to pit under green.

“Something made it come apart in this really long 50-foot section,” Johnson said according to’s David Caraviello. “I don’t know if we clipped something on the track that wore the tread and it unwound, or if something else happened…”

Johnson would eventually come home 19th.

Mercedes: F1 teams need to work together to avoid split

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MELBOURNE, Australia — Mercedes boss Toto Wolff said Friday that Formula One teams have a responsibility to try to overcome their differences over the future of the sport in the face of a threat by Ferrari to quit because of a number of proposed changes.

Bernie Ecclestone, who ran F1 for 40 years before being replaced by new owners Liberty Media last year, has raised the possibility that Ferrari chairman Sergio Marchionne could walk away from F1 and form a breakaway series over Liberty’s future vision for the sport.

Ferrari is unhappy with Liberty’s proposal to simplify engines and redistribute prize money among F1 teams after the current contract with teams expires at the end of 2020.

Ferrari team boss Maurizio Arrivabene would not comment on the specifics of Marchionne’s previous comments at the season-opening Australian Grand Prix on Friday, but said: “My only suggestion, please take him seriously.”

Wolff is also taking the possibility of Ferrari walking away seriously. He told Britain’s Press Association before the Australian GP that he agreed with Marchionne’s concerns and that Formula One can’t afford to alienate Ferrari or lose the team.

“Don’t mess with Sergio Marchionne,” he said. “Formula One needs Ferrari much more than Ferrari needs Formula One.”

Wolff was more diplomatic on Friday, saying he hopes all sides could come together for the good of the sport.

“I think this as much a battle on track as much as it is a fight off track for an advantage,” he said. “It is clear the current governance and how the rules are being made is not very functional. There’s too much different opinions and agendas on the table and we need to sort it for 2021 for the best interest of the sport.”

Red Bull boss Christian Horner agreed there are too many competing agendas, suggesting that the FIA-Formula One’s governing body-and Liberty Media come together to decide on a set of regulations and financial framework for the next contract and the teams can then decide if they want to accept it or not.

“Trying to get a consensus between teams that have varying objectives, different set-ups, is going to be impossible,” he said. “It’s history repeating itself. It happens every five or six years, every time the Concorde Agreement comes up for renewal.”

Tempers also flared during Friday’s media conference over another issue of contention between the teams – Ferrari’s recent hiring of FIA’s ex-safety director, Laurent Mekies.

Horner believes Ferrari broke an agreement among teams at a recent meeting to institute a 12-month waiting period for any former employee of FIA or FOM (Formula One Management) to be able to start working for one of F1’s teams. The concern is that former FIA staff who go to work for a specific team could share secrets from other teams.

“Certain teams were pushing for that period to be three years, but in the end it was agreed upon being 12 months,” he said. “It almost makes those meetings pointless if we can’t agree on something and action it.”

Arrivabene defended Ferrari’s move, saying Mekies would not join its team until after a six-month “gardening leave” period.

“There is nothing wrong with that because we were absolutely respecting the local law, the Swiss local law where Laurent was hired,” he said.