Hildebrand signing brings Indy 500 field near 30

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The race to get deals done for the month of May, and the Indianapolis 500, is already nearing an end.

A couple weeks ago, we examined where the Indianapolis 500 was in terms of engine car count. Here’s an update with after Thursday’s news that JR Hildebrand will be in the second Ed Carpenter Racing entry.

HONDA (17)

  • Andretti Autosport (5): No. 25 Marco Andretti, No. 27 James Hinchcliffe, No. 28 Ryan Hunter-Reay, No. 34 Carlos Munoz, No. 26 Kurt Busch-R
  • Schmidt Peterson Motorsports (3): No. 7 Mikhail Aleshin-R, No. 77 Simon Pagenaud, No. 5 Jacques Villeneuve-W
  • A.J. Foyt Racing (2): 14 Takuma Sato, No. 41 Martin Plowman-R
  • Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing (2): 15 Graham Rahal, 16 Oriol Servia
  • Dale Coyne Racing (2): No. 18 TBA, No. 19 Justin Wilson
  • Sarah Fisher Hartman Racing (2): No. 67 Josef Newgarden, No. 68 Alex Tagliani
  • Bryan Herta Autosport (1): No. 98 Jack Hawksworth-R

CHEVROLET (11)

  • Chip Ganassi Racing (4): No. 8 Ryan Briscoe, No. 9 Scott Dixon-W, No. 10 Tony Kanaan-W, No. 83 Charlie Kimball
  • Team Penske (3): No. 2 Juan Pablo Montoya-W, No. 3 Helio Castroneves-W, No. 12 Will Power
  • KVSH/KF AFS Racing (2): No. 11 Sebastien Bourdais, No. 17 Sebastian Saavedra
  • Ed Carpenter Racing (2): No. 20 Ed Carpenter, No. 21 JR Hildebrand

Honda has room for an 18th engine lease, per a spokesperson at Sebring last week. That 18th would be either a third car from Dale Coyne Racing or, less likely, the crowd-funded Cutters RT effort. Of course, Coyne’s second seat needs to be filled first.

Chevrolet will add a third for KV, expected to be announced either this week or next. A fifth for Ganassi is more possible than not.

Additional Chevrolets will need to make up the balance, in the form of the likely but not officially confirmed Lazier Partners Racing entry (Buddy Lazier) and then possible entries from either or both of Dreyer & Reinbold and Panther Racing, as separate entities. DRR seems a more likely proposition than Panther, at the moment.

The combination to get to 33 will be either 17 Honda-16 Chevrolet or 18 Honda-15 Chevrolet, barring any further surprises. 18 Honda and 16 Chevrolet seems more likely to get to 34 and open the potential of bumping.

Ricciardo completes Hungary Friday F1 practice double

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Daniel Ricciardo continued Red Bull’s strong start to the Hungarian Grand Prix weekend by completing a sweep of Friday’s Formula 1 practice sessions at the Hungaroring this afternoon.

Ricciardo led the way for Red Bull in FP1, beating early-season front-runners Ferrari and Mercedes to suggest that he could be in the mix for victory with the title contenders this weekend.

The Australian underpinned his good FP1 result by backing it up in FP2, finishing almost two-tenths of a second clear of the field with a best lap of 1:18.455.

Ricciardo overhauled a close-knit group featuring the Ferrari and Mercedes drivers, with Sebastian Vettel, Valtteri Bottas, Kimi Raikkonen and Lewis Hamilton all being covered by just 0.141 seconds from second to fifth respectively.

Max Verstappen showed signs of being able to emulate Ricciardo’s pace in the second Red Bull with the early part of his qualifying simulation, only to fade towards the end and finish half a second back in sixth place.

Nico Hulkenberg put in an impressive display for Renault to take seventh place ahead of McLaren’s Fernando Alonso in eighth. Teammate Stoffel Vandoorne wound up 10th, the pair being split by Toro Rosso’s Carlos Sainz Jr.

The session was interrupted with a little over 30 minutes to go when Pascal Wehrlein crashed heavily at Turn 11 in his Sauber, losing the rear end of the car.

Wehrlein was able to get out of the car unaided before being taken to the medical center, where he was duly cleared, but his Sauber chassis was less fortunate, sustaining damage that will set the team back heading into the rest of the race weekend.

A second red flag was thrown with 15 minutes remaining when Joylon Palmer suffered his second crash of the weekend, clouting the wall at the final corner after getting a twitch, deepening the Briton’s ongoing plight at Renault.

Running at the Hungaroring continues with final practice at 5am ET on Saturday morning.

Prost stresses importance of keeping Formula E on city streets

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MONTREAL, Canada – Four-time Formula 1 world champion and Renault Formula E team chief Alain Prost has moved to clarify comments regarding this weekend’s event in Montreal, stressing the importance of it taking place on the streets of the city instead of a permanent circuit.

The all-electric Formula E championship visits Montreal for the first time this weekend, with a course being created using the city streets instead of the Circuit Gilles Villeneuve that hosts Formula 1 race annually.

The Montreal ePrix acts as the season finale for Formula E’s third campaign, with Prost’s Renault e.dams operation in contention for both championships.

Formula E has enjoyed a strong ethos of racing on city streets instead of typical race circuits in a bid to promote electric vehicles and technology in the areas they are most needed for the future.

Reports in the Canadian press earlier this week claimed that Prost had said Formula E should have used the F1 track, but the Frenchman has moved to counter these comments and stress the importance of racing on inner-city street courses.

“I’ve never said that we should have gone to the Circuit Gilles Villeneuve, even if I love this place and I love the circuit. I think it is not adapted to the kind of race that we are doing at the moment,” Prost told NBC Sports.

“Obviously it’s too long and we need a shorter track, but most importantly we need the concept that we have from the beginning, supported by the FIA, that we want to be in the center of the cities. That is very important and I really support that.

“From the beginning that we heard about the project and we met the mayor two or three times, we were very happy and very positive to be in Montreal because we know the place, we know the fans that they love motor racing, and that will be something very different.

“We obviously give credibility to the electrical technology. We bring new people to watch the race. Maybe they are not interested by another sort of motor racing.

“We need a younger generation, maybe some children, they can see what is the car and technology for the future. So I’m very positive about that.

“I feel a bit sorry that I could be in the middle of a polemic. We want to be here for racing and we want to win the championship and celebrate in one of the best cities in the world.”

WEC ‘regrets’ Porsche’s LMP1 exit, working on plan for 2018 season

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The FIA World Endurance Championship has issued a statement following Porsche’s decision to close its LMP1 program at the end of the season, saying it “regrets” the departure of one of its most important stakeholders.

Porsche confirmed in the early hours of Friday morning that it would be pulling out of the WEC’s LMP1 class at the end of 2017 despite having one year remaining on its contract.

The German marque’s decision to quit and focus on a future Formula E entry leaves Toyota as the sole LMP1 Hybrid manufacturer on the grid for 2018, raising concerns about the future of the class.

Here is the WEC’s statement in full following Porsche’s bombshell.

Porsche, which recently confirmed its participation in the FIA LMP1-H World Endurance Championship as a manufacturer up to the end of the 2018 season, and which has been actively involved in the development of the technical regulations that will come into force in 2020, has just announced the withdrawal of its LMP1 hybrids from the end of the 2017 season.

The Automobile Club de l’Ouest, promoter of the WEC and organizer of the 24 Hours of Le Mans, regrets this precipitous departure, as it does the abruptness of the decision from one of endurance racing’s most successful and lauded manufacturers.

However, the ACO and the FIA, guardians of the existence and quality of the FIA World Endurance championship, have immediately set to work to put forward to everyone involved in endurance racing the outline of the 2018 season – a season which promises to be quite exceptional thanks to the introduction of new innovations.

Clearly, the reduction of costs and stability, but also inventiveness and audacity, will be vital in making it possible to stage an increasingly spectacular and attractive championship with the sport of endurance racing at the forefront.

This unprecedented 2018 World Championship will, without doubt, excite and enthuse competitors, partners and fans of endurance racing alike.

We look forward to seeing you in Mexico on September 2 and 3 for the next WEC event when further information will be given.

A spokesperson from the WEC also confirmed that, regardless of LMP1’s future, the series will retain its world championship status for 2018.

“The WEC will still have three world championship titles in play, even if there are fewer than two manufacturers in 2018: World Drivers title (for which LMP1 and LMP2 drivers are eligible), GT Manufacturers and GT Drivers,” said the spokesperson.

“The WEC’s world championship status is therefore not in doubt.”

Sauber announces multi-year F1 engine deal with Ferrari

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Sauber will continue to race with Ferrari power units in Formula 1 next year after announcing a new, multi-year deal on Friday morning.

Sauber has enjoyed an engine supply from Ferrari since BMW pulled its factory support ahead of the 2010 season, but announced in April that it would be working with Honda from 2018.

The deal was thrown into doubt when CEO Monisha Kaltenborn left the team following a dispute with its owners, with ex-Renault F1 chief Frederic Vasseur drafted in to replace her.

Reports suggested that the Sauber owners were not keen on working with Honda in 2018, leading to the deal being canceled, as announced by the team on Thursday.

Less than 24 hours later, Sauber confirmed that a multi-year deal to use up-to-date Ferrari power units had been agreed, starting in 2018.

“I am very pleased to confirm that we will continue to work with Scuderia Ferrari as our engine supplier in form of a multi-year agreement,” Vasseur said.

“The shared experience between the Sauber F1 Team and Ferrari has built a strong foundation, which will allow us to move forward swiftly and efficiently, also in terms of the development of the 2018 car.

“I am convinced that together we can achieve the results which reflect the passion and determination that is, and always has been, behind the Sauber F1 Team.”

The confirmation of Ferrari power may open up a possible seat for one of its junior drivers for 2018, with Charles Leclerc and Antonio Giovinazzi both making strong cases to step up to F1.

It does, however, not appear to bode well for Mercedes-backed Pascal Wehrlein, who has led Sauber’s charge alongside Marcus Ericsson. The latter is understood to have links to the team’s owners, making his seat secure.