Remembering ‘American Racing Hero’ Peter Revson, who left us 40 years ago Saturday

4 Comments

The month of March marks the start of spring, but it also has tragically figured in the deaths of a number of race car drivers who left us far too soon.

NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series driver John Nemechek, younger brother of veteran Sprint Cup and Nationwide Series driver Joe Nemechek, lost his life during a wreck at Homestead-Miami Speedway on March 16, 1997.

NHRA Funny Car drag racer Eric Medlen died after a wreck at Gainesville, Fla., on March 17, 2007.

This Wednesday will mark the eighth anniversary of the death of IndyCar driver Paul Dana during practice in 2006 at Homestead.

Formula One great Ayrton Senna would have been 54 on March 21, but was killed in a crash in May 1994.

Indy car great Gary Bettenhausen passed away last Sunday at the age of 72.

And it was 40 years ago today (March 22) that American Indy car and F1 driver Peter Revson was killed during testing for the 1974 South African Grand Prix at Kyalami.

While driving his UOP Shadow Ford DN3, Revson’s car suffered suspension failure, causing him to lose control and crash head-on into a barrier, bursting into flame.

Known in F1 as the “American Racing Hero,” Revson died almost instantly at the age of 35.

In a 2012 story in Motorsport magazine, DN3 designer Tony Southgate gave this recollection of Revson:

“Revvie was a fabulous easy-going guy, fitted in well, and a very good driver. But tragically he wasn’t with us for long. He qualified on row 2 for Argentina and row 3 for Brazil. Then he and I, our chief mechanic Pete Kerr and two other mechanics went down to Kyalami for testing before the South African GP.

“Revvie was going very well, very happy with the car, and then he didn’t come around. We rushed out to the back of the circuit and found the car buried under the Armco (barrier) on the outside of a quick corner. Peter was already in the ambulance and gone. I phoned the hospital, and they told me I had to go to the morgue and identify him. When the news got out all hell let loose, journalists banging on my hotel door, then the Revson family lawyer arrived and took over.”

The wreck was caused when a bolt on a titanium ball joint failed, Southgate said.

“We were using titanium quite a lot on the DN3, which was quite a new material then,” he told Motorsport. “Titanium is finicky, it has to be machined smooth and the surface polished, and a ball joint which had some coarse machining on it had failed.

“There was only one layer of Armco and the car, instead of being deflected or stopped, had gone right under as far as the cockpit. I felt personally responsible. It was a very difficult time. The glamour of Formula 1 had gone, replaced by a sort of loneliness.”

Revson was a dashing playboy – his autobiography, published after his death, was titled “Speed With Style” – and heir to the multi-billion dollar Revlon Cosmetics fortune.

But he was also part of what some called the Revson curse: in addition to Peter being killed in a race car, his brother Douglas died in a race in Denmark in 1967, and then Revson’s F1 replacement, Tom Pryce, died three years later (March 5, 1977) in the same South African Grand Prix track that claimed Peter.

Revson, who was posthumously inducted into the Motorsports Hall of Fame of America in 1996, was just starting to hit his stride as a race car driver when he was tragically killed.

He was named rookie of the year in the 1969 Indianapolis 500 after finishing fifth.

The following year, he and late actor Steve McQueen joined together to finish second in the 12 Hours of Sebring.

Revson had an outstanding season in 1971, becoming the first American to win the championship of the Can-Am Series, as well as finished a career-best second in the Indy 500 (he also started that race from the pole).

He joined the McLaren F1 team in 1972 and won two races the following year: the 1973 British Grand Prix and 1973 Canadian Grand Prix (making him the last American-born F1 race winner).

He left McLaren for Shadow in 1974 and had gone early to Kyalami to practice after retiring early in the first two F1 races of the season in Argentina and Brazil.

For two excellent tributes about Revson, check out the video below, as well as click here for a pictorial remembrance from MotorsportRetro.com.

Follow me @JerryBonkowski

F1 2017 driver review: Lance Stroll

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Team: Williams

Car No.: 18
Races: 20
Wins: 0
Podiums: 1
Best Finish: P3 (Azerbaijan)
Pole Positions: 0
Fastest Laps: 0
Points: 40
Championship Position: 13th

Lance Stroll’s arrival in Formula 1 at the start of the 2017 was a far from smooth one despite a significant private testing program being undertaken in the months leading up to his grand prix debut.

Even with older hand Felipe Massa at Williams, Stroll looked uneasy behind the wheel of the FW40 car through the opening run of races as he failed to reach the checkered flag in any of his first three starts.

The Canadian was left deflated after his first decent effort in Bahrain was cut short after a clash with Carlos Sainz Jr., calling it his “rock bottom” moment – but things would turn around on home soil.

Stroll produced a stunning fight through the field to take an excellent P9 in Canada, proving his talent seen in Formula 3 the previous year and shushing many of his critics.

Better would follow two weeks later in Baku when Stroll became the youngest rookie in F1 history to score a podium, dodging a crazy race to finish third. It would have been second had he not lost a drag race against Valtteri Bottas to the line.

Stroll’s form then fluctuated greatly. He was sublime on occasion, the best examples being Monza, when he started a remarkable P2 on the grid and ended as the top midfielder in P7, or Mexico where he took a brilliant sixth.

But there were too many weekends he was a little anonymous. Sure, Williams didn’t have the best car this year, but perhaps a little better was expected from Stroll.

2018 will be an even bigger challenge as he looks to the lead the team when a new teammate arrives – and at only 19, it is a lot to handle. Nevertheless, there are positive signs to be found; you just need to look for them a little.

Season High: Taking a shock podium in Baku after dodging chaos in front.

Season Low: A poor opening two races in Australia and China.