MotorSportsTalk’s predictions: Malaysian GP

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It would be wrong to say that the V6 era of Formula 1 “roared” into life two Sundays ago in Australia, but the new season began in dramatic fashion as the favorites struggled and the newbies flourished. Now, the teams are ready for this weekend’s Malaysian Grand Prix at the Sepang International Circuit, but has the fashion in which Nico Rosberg won the last race made these predictions any easier for our experts? Don’t count on it…

Luke Smith (@LukeSmithF1)

Race winner: Nico Rosberg. He did it in Australia, and he’ll do it again this weekend. I felt rather smug after picking him for Australia, truth be told, but he proved that he has what it takes to dominate races; I expect him to impress once again this weekend.

Surprising finish: Sebastian Vettel. Despite Red Bull’s disastrous start to the season in Australia, there is no denying that the RB10 is a quick car. Maybe not ‘Mercedes-quick’, but still quick. Expect the three-time Malaysian GP winner to bounce back this weekend.

Most to prove: Sauber. Did anyone actually notice Esteban Gutierrez and Adrian Sutil in Australia? Both drivers need to show what they can really do in Malaysia. Or, you know, actually get on TV. That helps.

Tony DiZinno (@tonydizinno)

Race winner: Jenson Button. Making a bit of a surprise pick here, but here’s my rationale: it’s notoriously hot in Malaysia but could rain too. Both play into his advantage; he’s good on conserving tires and has also been decent in the rain. A past Malaysian GP winner when it ended early too, and the McLaren seems a better prospect this year. 

Surprising finish: Valtteri Bottas. Going with the Williams driver to score his first career podium finish at the same track where fellow Finn Kimi Raikkonen won his first GP.

Most to prove: Lotus. Double Q1 elimination at Melbourne and with little time to upgrade before Malaysia, here’s hoping that Romain Grosjean and Pastor Maldonado are closer to the ballpark this weekend.

Christopher Estrada (@estradawriting)

Race winner: Lewis HamiltonMercedes says it has spent its downtime post-Australia focusing on the W05’s reliability. That’ll be good news for Hamilton, who was forced to bow out in the opening laps at Melbourne with an engine problem. He’s never won at Malaysia but he’s been close in recent years with a pair of thirds in 2012 and 2013. This year, he ascends to the top step.

Surprising finish: Sergio Perez. Checo’s race in Oz was altered dramatically by first-lap contact that forced him to race from behind all day. If he can get a clean start this weekend, the Mexican could be in good shape to be higher up in the points-paying bracket.

Most to prove: Kevin Magnussen and Daniil Kvyat. Both had a successful first Grand Prix, with Magnussen hitting the podium and Kvyat earning some points. But Malaysia’s heat and humidity are going to be a big challenge for them and fellow greenhorn Marcus Ericsson. Should their equipment hold up, it’ll be interesting to see how they themselves will do that in the cockpit as the race wears on.

Jerry Bonkowski (@JerryBonkowski)

Race winner: Sebastian Vettel. Yes, he had a bad start to the season at Australia, but it’s hard to pick against a guy who has won 3 of last 4 in Malaysia. But watch out for Fernando Alonso, he’s just as good there, too. 

Surprising finish: Daniel Ricciardo. After being disqualified at Australia, Daniel Ricciardo will come back with a vengeance at Malaysia. I expect nothing less than a podium finish, if not a win.

Most to prove: Sebastian Vettel, again. With all the negative press Red Bull got in the preseason, plus Vettel’s poor run at Melbourne, he needs to prove he’s still the best in F1. Also, don’t forget Louis Hamilton; he’s in the same boat as Vettel when it comes to bouncing back from Australia.

IndyCar 2017 driver review: Sebastien Bourdais

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MotorSportsTalk continues its annual review of the Verizon IndyCar Series drivers that raced in 2017. A dream start occurred for Sebastien Bourdais and the Dale Coyne Racing team upon their reunion, followed by a nightmare in Indianapolis with a huge crash in qualifying, and ended with a rapid recovery to build confidence for 2018.

Sebastien Bourdais, No. 18 Dale Coyne Racing Honda

  • 2016: 14th Place, 1 Win, Best Start 3rd, 1 Podium, 3 Top-5, 11 Top-10, 24 Laps Led, 11.9 Avg. Start, 11.2 Avg. Finish
  • 2017: 21st Place (8 Starts), 1 Win, Best Start 6th, 2 Podiums, 2 Top-5, 5 Top-10, 74 Laps Led, 12.4 Avg. Start, 11.0 Avg. Finish

The 2017 campaign for Sebastien Bourdais upon his return to Dale Coyne Racing will forever be known as both a year of “what could have been” and a year of “what a comeback it was.”

The abnormal season for Bourdais stretched eight races with a three-month break in the middle owing to his own mistake qualifying for the Indianapolis 500, which left him with multiple pelvic fractures and a fracture to his right hip. His car was a rocket ship; but after two laps at 231 mph, Bourdais appeared to over-correct and destroyed the wall at Turn 2 in Indy in a massive 127G impact. It was a horrific looking accident, but one that also saw Bourdais rather lucky to have not been injured worse.

It set forth in motion an incredible recovery that saw Bourdais back testing the Monday after Mid-Ohio, just over two months since the accident, then in race action just over three months later at the 1.25-mile Gateway Motorsports Park oval, and because Bourdais is a regulation badass, he finished in the top-10 straight out of the box. He worked as hard as he did to return earlier than anticipated to avoid an offseason of questions asking if he’d come back and if he’d be strong enough to do so.

The recovery was a welcome story to end the year after the agony at Indy that stopped a potential title run or certainly top-five in points finish in its tracks. A classic Coyne strategy special vaulted Bourdais from last to first and a popular win in his U.S. hometown of St. Petersburg to kick off the year. A second place at Long Beach backed it up and eighth at Barber kept him atop the standings.

But Indy was shaping up to be an important bounce back weekend after Bourdais got taken out in Phoenix, then incurred an engine failure in the IMS road course race. And then, of course, his loud and violent accident qualifying for the ‘500 changed the course of the season.

After three “almost there” but largely unfulfilling years at KV Racing Technology, Bourdais embraced the family atmosphere back at Coyne along with longtime engineers Craig Hampson and Olivier Boisson, determined to continue punching above the team’s weight. He crafted a remarkable story all season and will be keen to fulfill it over the course of a proper full campaign in 2018.