Darrell ‘Bubba’ Wallace Jr. picks up where he left off at Martinsville, fastest in Friday morning Trucks practice

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It appears Darrell “Bubba” Wallace Jr. is ready to pick up from where he left off at the last time he raced at Martinsville Speedway.

Wallace became the first African-American driver to win a national event in nearly 50 years when he won at Martinsville last October.

He obviously learned his lessons well there, as he was the fastest in practice Friday morning at the .526-mile, paper-clip shaped track.

In a lengthy practice that lasted nearly three hours (9 am to 11:45 am ET), Wallace was the fastest of the 37 drivers that took practice laps.

And he waited until the final of the 95 laps he ran to do it, covering the track at 96.662 mph.

Ryan Blaney was second-fastest at 96.288 mph, followed by Timothy Peters, Erik Jones and Ben Kennedy in the top-five.

Sixth through 10th were Brian Ickler, German Quiroga Jr., Ron Hornaday Jr., Cole Custer and Matt Crafton.

Nine drivers logged over 100 laps, led by Tyler Reddick (130), John West Townley (118), John Hunter Nemecheck (114), Joey Coulter (113), Korbin Forrister (108), and Marcus Mingus, Ben Rhodes and Tyler Young (all three ran 105 laps), and Erik Jones (103).

Only three drivers failed to exceed 90 mph: Ted Minor (88.718), Norm Benning (who ran just four laps and had a best speed of 88.062) and the slowest driver in the field, Jennifer Jo Cobb (87.594).

The trucks will be back on the track later this afternoon from 3 pm to 4:25 pm ET, just before the start of Sprint Cup qualifying.

Here’s the whole speed chart for the tracks from Friday morning’s practice:

1 Darrell Wallace Jr. 96.662 mph

2 Ryan Blaney 96.228

3 Timothy Peters 96.239

4 Erik Jones 96.220

5 Ben Kennedy 96.146

6 Brian Ickler 96.034

7 German Quiroga Jr. 95.990

8 Ron Hornaday Jr. 95.946

9 Cole Custer 95.762

10 Matt Crafton 95.728

11 Gray Gaulding 95.636

12 Ben Rhodes 95.405

13 Ross Chastain 95.376

14 Johnny Sauter 95.103

15 Chase Pistone 95.094

16 John Wes Townley 95.055

17 Tyler Reddick 94.851

18 Joey Coulter 94.836

19 Mason Mingus 94.623

20 John Hunter Nemecheck 94.581

21 Brandon Jones 94.567

22 Jeb Burton 94.496

23 Tyler Young 94.336

24 Spencer Gallagher 94.087

25 Caleb Holman 94.003

26 Alex Guenette 93.985

27 Clay Greenfield 93.919

28 Ray Black Jr. 93.437

29 Bryan Silas 93.249

30 Raymond Terczak Jr. 92.719

31 Justin Jennings 92.106

32 Travis Kvapil 91.918

33 Josh Williams 91.842

34 Korbin Forrister 90.977

35 Ted Minor 88.718

36 Norm Benning 88.062

37 Jennifer Jo Cobb 87.594

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Al Unser Jr. back in IndyCar after a decade away: ‘Life is very good’

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There’s been somewhat of a hole in Al Unser Jr.’s heart ever since he retired from racing in 2007.

It was a void, something was missing.

But now, after a decade away from racing, Unser has found the right medicine to fill that hole in his heart: he’s back in the racing game again.

No, he’s not driving again (although he does participate occasionally in vintage races), but the two-time Indianapolis 500 (1992 and 1994) winner is definitely back in the IndyCar world.

And he couldn’t be happier.

“For me, it’s a dream come true,” Unser told IndyCar.com. “Since I stepped out of the race car and retired from racing, there’s been something missing from my life, and it’s racing.”

Unser has hooked up with Harding Racing. The team competed in three races last season as a ramp-up for a full 17-race effort this season. While Unser’s official title with the team is “consultant,” he’s involved in so much more.

His main role is as a driving coach to 2015 IndyCar Rookie of the Year Gabby Chaves. But he’s also involved in so many other areas, including helping the team obtain sponsorships and much more.

He then added, “I’m involved in every sense of the word except actually driving the car. And I’m happy about that because I’m too old to drive the car.”

Unser, who won CART championships in 1990 and 1994, is now 55. He’s so involved with his new job that he even moved from his native New Mexico and has relocated to suburban Indianapolis.

Not only is it a new start for Unser, it also is for Chaves. After running all 16 races in 2015 for Bryan Herta Autosport with Curb-Agajanian, he competed in just seven races for Dale Coyne Racing in 2016 and only three races for Harding Racing last season.

But he definitely impressed the team, with a fifth- (Texas) and ninth-place (Indianapolis 500) finish in the first two races and 15th (Pocono) in the team’s final run of the season.

That’s why when Harding Racing decided to go fulltime in 2018, Chaves was their pick for behind the wheel. And Unser was their pick to help guide him to potential stardom in the series.

“(Team owner) Mike Harding is definitely a person that when he decides to do something, he does it right,” Unser told IndyCar.com. “The potential for this organization is through the sky. We’re all working really hard here and we see the potential.”

And as for Unser?

“Life is good, life is very good,” he told IndyCar.com. “We’re back full force, eager and better than ever.”

Click here for the full story about Unser from IndyCar.com.