Gig ’em, Gordon: 4-time Cup champ running Texas A&M colors this weekend

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With the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series visiting Texas Motor Speedway this weekend, Jeff Gordon’s No. 24 Hendrick Motorsports Chevrolet has taken on a deep shade of maroon.

We can thank Texas A&M’s Dwight Look College of Engineering for that. In a deal similar to that of Jamie McMurray running (and winning) with the Auburn colors last fall at Talladega, Charles Shaver – the CEO of Gordon’s main sponsor, Axalta Coating Systems, and an A&M graduate – has paid for Gordon’s car to carry the Aggie maroon and white at TMS.

In addition to the special livery, 28 students from Texas A&M Engineering will be able to learn more about how their lessons apply to the world of motorsports as VIP guests for the weekend.

Prior to heading for TMS, Gordon made the rounds at the A&M campus in College Station, Texas, where he showed off his special ride and joined up with A&M football coach Kevin Sumlin to watch a practice.

The four-time Sprint Cup champion didn’t go to college, but is hopeful that his own children will be able to have that privilege when they grow up.

“Every day, I wish that I had more of an education and just that experience in life, I think, is huge,” Gordon said. “Just going to college – the responsibilities of attending classes, having fun at parties – you know, the balance between being more responsible as an adult and stepping into the next stage of your life.”

As for interacting with the A&M students, Gordon says they’ve been glad to have the chance to interact with the Hendrick Motorsports engineers in a real-world setting.

A solid engineering program has become essential in NASCAR as the sport has become more sophisticated in its technology. Nowadays, top squads like HMS have legions of engineers on their payroll, all dedicated to squeezing more speed, more handling – more everything – out of their race cars.

Gordon figures that for those outside of the day-to-day life of the sport, that aspect can be overlooked. Thus, he welcomes the opportunity to help show aspiring engineers a possible plan for their future.

“I think people that aren’t in the Carolinas or at the race track every weekend underestimate how much technology and engineering goes into what we do,” he explained. “If you just go to Hendrick Motorsports and see the growth in engineering and people that are engineers, you start to get a sense of why this tie is so crucial and important.

“We’ve tapped into an engineering schools and students more around the Carolinas and the Midwest, but I’m not so sure we’ve tapped into schools like Texas A&M, and I think a lot of it is because maybe they just don’t realize that could be a potential path for them…”

Al Unser Jr. back in IndyCar after a decade away: ‘Life is very good’

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There’s been somewhat of a hole in Al Unser Jr.’s heart ever since he retired from racing in 2007.

It was a void, something was missing.

But now, after a decade away from racing, Unser has found the right medicine to fill that hole in his heart: he’s back in the racing game again.

No, he’s not driving again (although he does participate occasionally in vintage races), but the two-time Indianapolis 500 (1992 and 1994) winner is definitely back in the IndyCar world.

And he couldn’t be happier.

“For me, it’s a dream come true,” Unser told IndyCar.com. “Since I stepped out of the race car and retired from racing, there’s been something missing from my life, and it’s racing.”

Unser has hooked up with Harding Racing. The team competed in three races last season as a ramp-up for a full 17-race effort this season. While Unser’s official title with the team is “consultant,” he’s involved in so much more.

His main role is as a driving coach to 2015 IndyCar Rookie of the Year Gabby Chaves. But he’s also involved in so many other areas, including helping the team obtain sponsorships and much more.

He then added, “I’m involved in every sense of the word except actually driving the car. And I’m happy about that because I’m too old to drive the car.”

Unser, who won CART championships in 1990 and 1994, is now 55. He’s so involved with his new job that he even moved from his native New Mexico and has relocated to suburban Indianapolis.

Not only is it a new start for Unser, it also is for Chaves. After running all 16 races in 2015 for Bryan Herta Autosport with Curb-Agajanian, he competed in just seven races for Dale Coyne Racing in 2016 and only three races for Harding Racing last season.

But he definitely impressed the team, with a fifth- (Texas) and ninth-place (Indianapolis 500) finish in the first two races and 15th (Pocono) in the team’s final run of the season.

That’s why when Harding Racing decided to go fulltime in 2018, Chaves was their pick for behind the wheel. And Unser was their pick to help guide him to potential stardom in the series.

“(Team owner) Mike Harding is definitely a person that when he decides to do something, he does it right,” Unser told IndyCar.com. “The potential for this organization is through the sky. We’re all working really hard here and we see the potential.”

And as for Unser?

“Life is good, life is very good,” he told IndyCar.com. “We’re back full force, eager and better than ever.”

Click here for the full story about Unser from IndyCar.com.