Mideast Bahrain F1 GP Auto Racing

Bahrain a landmark race for Rosberg, Button and Formula 1

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The Bahrain Grand Prix has experienced a difficult time in Formula 1 over the past ten years. Despite dwindling attendances and political unrest that resulted in the cancellation of the 2011 race, the kingdom has made it to a landmark stage with this weekend’s event marking the 10th anniversary of the inaugural grand prix in Bahrain.

As part of the celebrations to mark a decade of Formula 1, the race at the Bahrain International Circuit will be a night race for the first time, starting at 6pm. Already in practice and qualifying, there has been a noticeable improvement to the atmosphere and image of the event, and the officials are keen on making the night race a yearly event.

However, this is also an important race in the history of Formula 1 itself. Today’s grand prix is the 900th world championship event, with the first being the 1950 British Grand Prix. The 800th was also a night race at the 2008 Singapore Grand Prix, which was marred by the Renault crash-gate saga.

Jenson Button is also celebrating a big milestone today as it will be his 250th grand prix start. The British driver made his debut at the 2000 Australian Grand Prix, and won the 2009 world championship with Brawn GP. Having won his 200th race (the 2011 Hungarian GP), Button has a habit of living up to the big occasion, but from P6 on the grid he might have to settle for third place at best today.

For pole-sitter Nico Rosberg, this race is his 150th start in Formula 1. The German driver made his debut at this circuit in 2006 with Williams, where he set the fastest lap. Should he manage to win today’s race, he would equal his father’s tally of five victories in Formula 1. Given the pace of the Mercedes car, it is hard to bet against either Rosberg or teammate Lewis Hamilton taking the checkered flag first.

The 2014 Bahrain Grand Prix is live on NBCSN and Live Extra from 10:30am ET today.

Verstappen heads up Red Bull 1-2 in final USGP practice at COTA

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Max Verstappen closed out Formula 1 practice for the United States Grand Prix in Austin, Texas at the top of the timesheets, finishing two-tenths of a second clear of the field at the Circuit of The Americas ahead of qualifying.

Verstappen headed up a Red Bull one-two in FP3 as Mercedes failed to get in a qualifying simulation for either Lewis Hamilton or Nico Rosberg, leaving them fourth and fifth respectively in the timesheets.

Verstappen put in a fastest lap time of 1:36.766 with over 10 minutes remaining in the session, although the Dutchman did appear to exceed track limits at both Turn 19 and Turn 20 in the process.

Nevertheless, Verstappen’s time stood, giving him P1 come the end of the session despite a late charge from Hamilton.

The Briton crossed the line to start his final flying lap with one second left on the clock, but backed off through the final sector and told his team it was “really poor timing”.

Rosberg also failed to get in a flying lap, setting the fastest middle sector of any driver before abandoning his effort and coming into the pits with a minute left.

Daniel Ricciardo finished the session second for Red Bull, while Ferrari’s Kimi Raikkonen was half a second off Verstappen in third place. Teammate Sebastian Vettel followed the Mercedes duo in sixth place.

Nico Hulkenberg continued his streak of top-10 finishes in practice at COTA, ending FP3 in seventh place ahead of Williams’ Valtteri Bottas. The McLaren pair of Jenson Button and Fernando Alonso rounded out the top 10.

The session was red flagged after 20 minutes when Pascal Wehrlein’s Manor snapped off the track at Turn 19, becoming beached in the gravel. The German waited for the marshals to arrive at his car in the hope of being pushed back onto the track, but was ultimately forced to switch his car off and end his FP3 running.

Carlos Sainz Jr. was another driver to hit trouble in final practice, suffering two separate punctures in the hour-long session that limited him to just six laps in total.

The qualifying show for the United States Grand Prix is live on NBCSN and the NBC Sports app from 12:30pm ET today, including a full re-run of FP3.

Mercedes’ Suzuka protest over Verstappen down to ‘miscommunication’

SUZUKA, JAPAN - OCTOBER 09: Lewis Hamilton of Great Britain driving the (44) Mercedes AMG Petronas F1 Team Mercedes F1 WO7 Mercedes PU106C Hybrid turbo locks a wheel under braking as he tries to overtake Max Verstappen of the Netherlands driving the (33) Red Bull Racing Red Bull-TAG Heuer RB12 TAG Heuer on track during the Formula One Grand Prix of Japan at Suzuka Circuit on October 9, 2016 in Suzuka.  (Photo by Charles Coates/Getty Images)
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Mercedes Formula 1 chief Toto Wolff has revealed that the team’s brief protest over Max Verstappen’s second-place finish in the Japanese Grand Prix was the result of a “miscommunication”.

Mercedes contacted the FIA following the race at Suzuka on October 9 to lodge a protest against Verstappen, believing his on-track defence from Lewis Hamilton in the closing laps to have breached the sporting regulations.

Verstappen finished less than a second clear at the checkered flag, meaning a time penalty would gain Hamilton a position and three extra points in his bid for the drivers’ championship.

The FIA stewards informed Mercedes that a decision could not be made at Suzuka as both Hamilton and Verstappen had already left the track, postponing a hearing to the United States Grand Prix weekend in Austin.

Mercedes withdrew its protest not long after, making the result of the race official and leaving Verstappen in second place with Hamilton third.

Ahead of this weekend’s race in Austin, Wolff explained what caused the mix-up over the protest, saying that Mercedes had to make a split decision before leaving Japan.

“It was a miscommunication,” Wolff said.

“When we left the circuit, I said that the Verstappen manoeuvre was a hard manoeuvre but probably what we want to see in Formula 1. He’s refreshing and I think that the drivers need to sort that out among themselves on track.

“And we decided not to step in and then it was an unfortunate coincidence that we took off, we left. The team had a minute to decide whether to protest or not and that’s what they did.

“Once we were able to communicate again, which was 30 minutes after take-off, we decided to withdraw the protest.”

WATCH LIVE: FP3 into USGP qualifying, 12:30 p.m. ET on NBCSN

AUSTIN, TX - OCTOBER 21: Nico Hulkenberg of Germany driving the (27) Sahara Force India F1 Team VJM09 Mercedes PU106C Hybrid turbo on track during practice for the United States Formula One Grand Prix at Circuit of The Americas on October 21, 2016 in Austin, United States.  (Photo by Mark Thompson/Getty Images)
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AUSTIN, Texas – The third and final free practice session and qualifying for Sunday’s United States Grand Prix are on tap from Circuit of The Americas in Austin, and you can watch coverage of both on NBCSN and streaming via NBCSports.com and the NBC Sports App.

A mega-show will run on NBCSN covering both sessions, from 12:30 to 4 p.m. ET.

Coverage of FP3 can be seen live online at NBCSports.com (f1stream.nbcsports.com) and the NBC Sports App for participating cable providers at 11 a.m. ET, and will run until 12 p.m. ET.

That FP3 coverage will then lead off the NBCSN show at 12:30 p.m. ET, and run for an hour. A half-hour pre-qualifying show then runs from 1:30 p.m. ET into the start of LIVE qualifying at 2 p.m. ET. Qualifying runs for an hour until 3 p.m. ET.

From 3 to 4 p.m. ET, there will be a post-qualifying show from Austin.

Leigh Diffey, David Hobbs and Steve Matchett are in the commentary booth with Will Buxton patrolling the pits and paddock for today’s coverage.

Again, that’s 11 a.m. ET for the live stream of FP3, then 12:30 p.m. ET on NBCSN for TV coverage of FP3, and LIVE qualifying from Austin.

Full times and details for the weekend are linked here.

Ecclestone: ‘Difficult’ to get more F1 races in the United States

HOCKENHEIM, GERMANY - JULY 29: F1 supremo Bernie Ecclestone walks in the Paddock  during practice for the Formula One Grand Prix of Germany at Hockenheimring on July 29, 2016 in Hockenheim, Germany.  (Photo by Mark Thompson/Getty Images)
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Formula 1 CEO Bernie Ecclestone believes it will be “difficult” to get more races in the United States despite a renewed drive to grow the sport in the American market.

The Circuit of The Americas in Austin, Texas plays host to the United States Grand Prix for the fifth time this weekend, with track chairman Bobby Epstein predicting its second-highest attendance.

Following a recent takeover of F1 by American company Liberty Media, a renewed drive on developing the sport’s presence in the USA is expected.

New F1 chairman Chase Carey has expressed a desire to grow the American fanbase, leading to questions about holding multiple races in the United States.

However, Ecclestone is unsure that getting another race in the USA would be possible, having tried to get the Grand Prix of the America in New Jersey off the ground in recent years.

“I think it will be difficult to get more races [in the U.S.]” Ecclestone told Reuters.

“I tried in New York. The trouble with the Americans is you want to do a deal with them and they want guaranteed profit before they start.

“I said if I knew that was going to happen, I wouldn’t need you.”

Mercedes F1 chief Toto Wolff would like to see more American races added to the calendar, believing it to be an important market for the German manufacturer.

“It’s great to be in such a great place like Austin. Every year we are coming here, it’s really a fantastic venue,” Wolff said.

“Having more grands prix in such an important market for Mercedes, it would be good and wherever we can help, we will do that.”

However, Epstein expressed caution when talking to NBC Sports earlier this month about adding more U.S. races to the calendar, with the cost of hosting a grand prix being a huge stumbling block.

“The ability to support a number of multiple races in the U.S. is going to depend largely on the size of the fanbase,” Epstein said.

“It’s kind of a chicken and the egg equation. If you put on more races, it will create more fans, not just in the first year but over time hopefully it does.

“As much as anything, promoting the sport on TV and having races on our timezone over five to 10 years will build more fans.”