Joey Logano charges past Jeff Gordon to Texas win in G-W-C

Leave a comment

What was effectively a Sunday cruise at Texas Motor Speedway for Joey Logano got far more interesting than he likely would have preferred.

Logano took the lead just after a restart at Lap 227 and dominated the final stages of the race – only to have a left-rear tire failure for Kurt Busch spray debris on the track and trigger the caution with two laps to go.

Coming out third after pit stops before the first Green-White-Checkered finish attempt, he was going to have to earn this one. And he did, blowing past Brian Vickers and then Jeff Gordon on the final lap to nail down a win in the Duck Commander 500.

After earning Top-5 finishes in both races last year at Texas Motor Speedway, Logano has conquered the 1.5-mile oval for the first time in his Sprint Cup career.

Additionally, he is now the seventh different winner in as many Sprint Cup races this season. With the result, he joins Team Penske teammate Brad Keselowski in the Chase Grid, with the latter having won earlier this year in Las Vegas.

“Talk about a lot of emotions! You feel like you’re about to win the race and then the caution comes out when you’re coming to take the white and you’re ‘You’ve got to be kidding me,'” Logano told Fox Sports.

After Busch’s issue, Logano led the field to the pits where Gordon and Vickers leapfrogged him by taking two tires to Logano’s four.

That put Logano third in line ahead of Keselowski, albeit only briefly; Keselowski was tagged for speeding on pit road and had to drop to the tail end of the longest line (he would finish 15th).

Gordon got a good restart in G-W-C, but Logano quickly dispatched Vickers on the inside. Then, as the white flag waved, Logano went side-by-side with Gordon across the start/finish line.

Logano would complete the pass in Turn 1 and leave Gordon in the dust.

“The boys did a great job in the pits and we came out where we needed to be,” Logano said. “Then, I had a good enough restart and then a good enough run on [Gordon] to pass him…Man, it feels good to be back in Victory Lane, in the Chase. I’m just stoked.”

As for Gordon, who almost took a Texas A&M-sponsored car to Victory Lane in the Lone Star State, he admitted that he wouldn’t have had a chance to win without the yellow at the end.

“At one point [today], I thought we didn’t have a shot at all,” Gordon said. “We got a pretty good restart, Joey was right on me and I was pretty loose in [Turns] 1 and 2.

“I wish I’d would’ve gone a little bit higher down in 3 and 4, but he got that run off of 4 and then he got in the back of me so I thought I was gonna wreck. At that point, I was like, ‘Second would be good’ [laughs].”

Gordon can at least take solace in becoming the new Sprint Cup points leader by four points over Matt Kenseth.

Gordon’s Hendrick Motorsports teammate, Dale Earnhardt Jr., entered Texas as the points leader but crashed out of the race on Lap 13 after running his left-side tires into the wet infield grass and then skidding into the wall.

That was part of a bizarre beginning to the event, which started with the first 10 laps running under yellow to help track dryers put more heat in the track.

Following Earnhardt’s wreck, another Texas contender fell by the wayside on Lap 28 as Kevin Harvick suffered a terminal engine problem that continues his run of horrid luck.

Fortunately, things eventually settled down and the race took on a normal rhythm – until the caution with two laps to go jumbled everything up.

While Logano and Gordon finished first and second pretty much by themselves, Kyle Busch was left to fight off a cluster of cars for third place. But the Joe Gibbs Racing driver was able to do the job, completing a solid run after starting 29th.

Vickers faded back on the restart after Logano took care of him, but was able to nip Kyle Larson at the stripe for fourth.

NASCAR SPRINT CUP SERIES – DUCK COMMANDER 500 AT TEXAS
Unofficial Results

1. Joey Logano, led 108 laps
2. Jeff Gordon, led 40 laps
3. Kyle Busch, led 10 laps
4. Brian Vickers
5. Kyle Larson
6. Greg Biffle
7. Matt Kenseth
8. Clint Bowyer, led 1 lap
9. Paul Menard
10. Tony Stewart, led 74 laps
11. Kasey Kahne
12. Aric Almirola
13. Denny Hamlin, led 20 laps
14. Carl Edwards
15. Brad Keselowski, led 85 laps
16. Ryan Newman
17. Jamie McMurray
18. Martin Truex Jr.
ONE LAP DOWN
19. Trevor Bayne
20. Marcos Ambrose
21. Austin Dillon
22. David Gilliland
23. A.J. Allmendinger
24. Justin Allgaier
TWO LAPS DOWN
25. Jimmie Johnson
26. Ricky Stenhouse Jr.
27. Danica Patrick
28. Casey Mears
THREE LAPS DOWN
29. Michael Annett
FIVE LAPS DOWN
30. Michael McDowell
31. Cole Whitt
32. Alex Bowman
SIX LAPS DOWN
33. Reed Sorenson, led one lap
34. Landon Cassill
35. David Ragan
SEVEN LAPS DOWN
36. Josh Wise
EIGHT LAPS DOWN
37. Travis Kvapil
38. David Reutimann

39. Kurt Busch, Lap 327, Accident
40. Parker Kligerman, Lap 313, Overheating
41. Dave Blaney, Lap 272, Steering
42. Kevin Harvick, led one lap, Lap 28, Engine
43. Dale Earnhardt Jr., Lap 12, Accident

Cooper solidifies PWC GT presence with Callaway Corvette

Callaway, Cooper, Gill. Photo: PWC
Leave a comment

Pirelli World Challenge could use a “face” of the series from a driving standpoint, and American Michael Cooper is a good candidate to fill that role for 2018.

Cooper, 27, has won PWC Touring Car, GTS and, most recently the SprintX GT titles within the series and has quickly blossomed into one of the series’ top GT stars.

It’s been a rapid rise for the Syosset, N.Y. native, entering into a world filled with series stars and champions such as Johnny O’Connell, Patrick Long, Alvaro Parente and a host of others.

But under O’Connell’s tutelage, Cooper admirably filled the rather gaping shoes vacated by Andy Pilgrim at Cadillac Racing, steering the Cadillac ATS-V.R to multiple race wins in the last two years – including a sweep of this year’s season finale weekend at Sonoma.

Cooper and Jordan Taylor were the model of consistency in SprintX this year, winning once at Canadian Tire Motorsport Park and surviving contact at Circuit of The Americas to take that title.

With Cadillac withdrawing its ATS-V.R program at the end of the year though, Cooper was left a free agent for 2018. Fortunately with one door closed another opened, in the form of the GM-blessed but full Callaway Competition USA effort with its Callaway Corvette C7 GT3-R that will come Stateside next year. Cooper and Daniel Keilwitz will be in the team’s two cars for the full season; the car was fully unveiled last week at the PRI Show in Indianapolis.

The Callaway is a proven commodity in Europe but couldn’t run in the U.S. unless the path was cleared by one of GM’s factory programs to end a direct, potential head-to-head competition.

Moving from the Cadillac to the Callaway Corvette should be a natural transition, Cooper said last week.

“It worked out incredibly well that GM decided to allow Calloway to run the car in the United States and it created an opportunity for me that wouldn’t have been there otherwise,” he told NBC Sports. “I talked to a lot of other GT teams and at the end of the day, I felt like this was the best direction for me to be competitive next year and to also continue furthering my career with General Motors.”

Indeed Cooper has graduated from the Blackdog Speed Shop Chevrolet Camaro Z/28.R in GTS to the Cadillac and now to the Callaway Corvette. Cooper hailed the Cadillac team for what they did for his career growth.

“Working with Cadillac Racing has been instrumental in developing my abilities both on and off the track,” he said. “So I’m definitely a much more well-rounded driver now and have a lot of experience in the World Challenge GT field, so I kind of know what to expect going into that first race and going into that first corner in St. Pete.”

As noted, the car’s success in Europe means it’s a well-oiled machine by the time Reeves Callaway has worked with PWC to bring it Stateside next year. And as Cooper explained, discussions had been underway for a bit of time to ensure his presence in this car and team.

“I think the car is going to be extremely capable. It’s already won championships and races in Europe. I think, in bringing it over here, we’re going to hit the ground running straight away,” he said.

“Calloway had wanted me to come drive for them in July or August. We always kept in touch since then, and there was a lot of work trying to put together a program before they decided that they were going to do a fully fledged factory program. So once they made that decision, I think the pieces were kind of in place already, and the conversations had been had to be able to say ‘You’re going to be our guy.’”

December is late for IMSA programs to get finalized, but it’s relatively early for PWC, with the season not starting until mid-March in St. Petersburg. An extensive testing program should follow, as Callaway establishes its U.S. base and infrastructure.

“It’s definitely early for a Pirelli World Challenge program to be announced in December when we start racing in March. So that’s very good,” he said. “But, the team has a lot of work ahead of them in terms of getting infrastructure set up here in the United States, because a lot of their racing program has been in Europe. So, there will be a testing program, but they have to get the infrastructure in place first. But, we’ll be well prepared for St. Pete, I’m certain of it.

“Last year was the first year when I could sit back, kick my feet up, and know what I was doing next year. So, to be able to have everything done and be able to announce it this early on makes my life less stressful and now I can just focus on preparing myself and my team for next year.”