Long Beach flashback: Montoya’s first CART win in 1999 (VIDEO)

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The 1999 Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach marked the arrival – officially – of then-Target Chip Ganassi Racing driver Juan Pablo Montoya to North American racing.

Yes, the Williams test driver/F3000 champion had impressed in his first two starts in Homestead and Motegi, but it was at Long Beach where he really shone through.

In 1999, the Long Beach race was the 25th anniversary of the event, and ran on a one-off course design. An interim design for 1999 featured the introduction of the new aquarium section, where cars turned left off Shoreline Dr. for the first time as opposed to right. Through the section, they’d then rejoin at the old Turn 3 before moving up onto the back straight. The track was revised to its current configuration a year later.

Montoya started fifth but quickly moved up to second, hounding a then first-time pole sitter, Tony Kanaan, in the No. 44 McDonald’s Championship Racing Reynard-Honda. You’ll see that brief bit of action below.

Kanaan ultimately crashed out of the race, which left Montoya to dominate the remainder of the race. With clean pit stops and hitting his marks every time, Montoya held off Dario Franchitti and Bryan Herta to take his first victory in North America.

Interestingly, Franchitti and Herta had finished second and third the year previous to Montoya’s predecessor at CGR, Alex Zanardi.

Fifteen years later, Montoya is back but now driving for Team Penske, while Kanaan, perhaps fittingly, is in the No. 10 Target car. Montoya’s 2014 teammate Helio Castroneves was also in the 1999 race, but struggled to a 19th place finish driving for Hogan Racing in a Lola-Mercedes.

Other notes from those in the 1999 field ahead of this year’s race: Franchitti’s now in an advisory role at Ganassi, Herta, Michael Andretti, Jimmy Vasser own teams (as does Bobby Rahal, who fielded Herta and Max Papis that year), Christian Fittipaldi and Scott Pruett will race Daytona Prototypes in the supporting TUDOR United SportsCar Championship series, Robby Gordon’s SPEED Energy Stadium SUPER Trucks join the docket on Sunday, and last but certainly not least, “the Thrill from West Hill,” Paul Tracy, joins NBCSN’s broadcast team for the first Verizon IndyCar Series race of the year on the network.

You can see Sunday’s race at 4 p.m. ET live on NBCSN and NBC Sports Live Extra.

‘No desire’ for Lewis Hamilton to race in Indianapolis 500

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Lewis Hamilton has ruled out a future appearance in the Indianapolis 500, saying he has “no real plans” to do any serious racing once his time in Formula 1 is over.

Former teammate and current McLaren driver Fernando Alonso took part in the 101st running of the Indy 500 in May, qualifying fifth and running high up the order before retiring late on with an engine issue.

The F1-to-IndyCar crossover proved to be one of the biggest motorsport stories of the year, and has stirred the imagination of other drivers to make a similar step into other events in the future, including the 24 Hours of Le Mans which is known to be on Alonso’s radar as well as that of Haas racer Romain Grosjean.

Three-time F1 world champion Hamilton admired 2017 Indy 500 winner Takuma Sato’s victory ring when on the podium at the Japanese Grand Prix earlier this month, trying it on and joking it may spur him to enter the race to try and win the jewelry.

Speaking ahead of this weekend’s United States Grand Prix in Austin, Texas, Hamilton stressed he made the comment in jest, saying he holds not interest in entering the ‘500.

“Honestly it hasn’t inspired me to do the Indy 500,” Hamilton said.

“I’ve always respected it and appreciated it. I got to watch part of it when Fernando did it which I thought was super exciting. I love the idea of drivers being able to do more than one series.

“Just the other day I got to drive an F1 car on an oval circuit which was interesting. I have a huge amount of respect for those drivers as it is quite scary approaching those banks at the speeds that they do.

“I personally don’t have a desire to drive it. Maybe one day I will go out and have some fun.

“I have a lot of opportunities to do those kinds of things, but no real plans to do anything serious.”

Hamilton has previously said he would like to try a NASCAR race for fun one day, but has made clear his plan after his F1 career is over is to distance himself from racing in order to pursue other interests.