He’s no number 2: Ricciardo proving his worth at Red Bull already

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Mark Webber once famously – or perhaps infamously – quipped, “Not bad for a number two driver” after winning the 2010 British Grand Prix. The second season of he and Sebastian Vettel as Red Bull teammates was the year the pleasantries of the year previous began to erode, ever so slowly, but culminating in bangs like at Istanbul and mind-games like Silverstone.

Although Webber had the edge late in that season points-wise, late season victories by Vettel in Japan and Brazil kept him in the title game, even as both sought to overtake Fernando Alonso in his Ferrari. Then of course the Abu Dhabi finale happened, Alonso shaded the wrong Red Bull car’s strategy (Webber’s), and both had lost out to Vettel as the then-23-year-old German claimed the first of his four successive World Championships after winning the race.

It was the beginning of the end for Webber at Red Bull, as Vettel pummeled him over the next three seasons. Webber was always good if not great, whereas Vettel had the ability to fuse his driving style with the way the car was designed, and seemingly always had the pace edge.

Oh, Webber still had his fighting moments. But they were few and far between these last three years.

Which makes Daniel Ricciardo’s sublime start to 2014 all the more remarkable. Because not only is he not intimidated by sitting in the same chassis as the reigning king of the sport, he’s legitimately taking it to him.

With three Grands Prix in the book, we have enough evidence to prove that his Australia and Malaysia efforts weren’t a fluke. In Bahrain, Ricciardo was Red Bull’s man, and not Vettel.

Perhaps it’s fitting Ricciardo picked the Number 3 going into this season – he picked it from his karting history and his fandom of the late Dale Earnhardt. Heck, he and Dale Earnhardt Jr. have even exchanged tweets this year.

On-track though, much like we discovered Vettel can be a ruthless assassin behind the wheel last year in the whole Multi-21 episode, in Ricciardo, we may have his equal – a stealthy, no holds barred stunner under the helmet whose effervescent smile is the public persona of his steely resolve.

Consider Red Bull’s myriad woes in preseason testing and yet Ricciardo didn’t publicly appear phased. He outqualified Vettel on his team debut, doing everything he could and then some in his home Grand Prix with second on the grid and in the race before his eventual disqualification due to exceeding the fuel flow limit.

In Malaysia, he wasn’t quite ahead of Vettel, only briefly behind in the rain-affected qualifying (Vettel was second and Ricciardo fifth), but he shaded him closely in the race. But more bad luck followed with his unsafe release and front wing damage then occurring near the end of the race, when a sure top-five position was there for the taking.

Ten-spot grid penalty for Bahrain? No problem. Just go out and outqualify Vettel again, with third place for the Aussie while the champ failed to get out of Q2. Then from 13th on the grid, run a strategy that sees him quicker and have a radio transmission relayed as such. Then pass him late in the race, for position, and end fourth to Vettel’s frustrating sixth.

Anyone else could have been battered by the bad luck to open his chance at this top-flight opportunity, but not Ricciardo. How he has responded in the face of adversity has been brilliant to watch, and one of the best stories of the season thus far.

With Jean-Eric Vergne having his struggles with rookie Daniil Kvyat at Toro Rosso as well, Red Bull’s choice of Ricciardo has been further confirmed. Vergne has his moments of brilliance but not the out-and-out pace, consistency or luck where Ricciardo seems to have two of the three on a regular basis.

The question now is whether Ricciardo’s success is fleeting, or here to stay.

We’ve not seen Vettel in a position where a teammate, in his F1 career dating to his debut as a 19-year-old in 2007, could consistently match or beat him over the course of a full season. Vitantonio Liuzzi and Sebastien Bourdais couldn’t at Toro Rosso; Webber, as mentioned above, was never a true equal in the same machinery.

Yet Ricciardo stands on the precipice of being able to do that, by the combination of his skillset and his mentality.

Having the right attitude to go head-to-head with an alpha dog in the same garage is the key to not getting annihilated. So far Ricciardo seems to have that right temperament to go along with his on-track prowess.

If he can continue this push, Vettel will be in the unusual position of needing to respond.

Perhaps then we can see another side of Vettel. He needed comebacks to win the 2010 and 2012 championships, but he hasn’t been in a position where he’s had to come back within his own team.

He may need to now after Bahrain. Because through three Grands Prix, Daniel Ricciardo at Red Bull is no number two driver. He is a clear 1A.

Indy Lights: Chad Boat to make Indy Lights debut with Belardi

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Belardi Auto Racing, which currently fields entries for Aaron Telitz, Santi Urrutia, and Shelby Blackstock in the Indy Lights Presented by Cooper Tires, announced on Tuesday that USAC standout Chad Boat, son of former Verizon IndyCar Series race winner Billy Boat, will make his Indy Lights debut with the Brian Belardi led-outfit. Boat will contest the July 9 race at Iowa Speedway, a track he has previously raced on in the NASCAR Xfinity Series, and will return for the August 26 event at Gateway Motorsports Park.

“We’re extremely pleased to announce the addition of Chad Boat to our stable of drivers for the Iowa and Gateway Indy Lights oval races this summer,” team owner Brian Belardi detailed. “It’s exciting to have a second-generation driver running with us, and we’re certainly looking forward to getting Chad on track in Iowa.”

The younger Boat has become a star in his own right in USAC, winning Rookie of the Year honors in both the USAC National Midget and Sprint car divisions. The 25-year-old will pilot the No. 84 entry, with sponsorship from Pristine Auction.

“I grew up watching my dad race Indy cars, so having the opportunity to run Indy Lights this year is absolutely surreal,” said Boat. “I have to thank Belardi Auto Racing for giving me a shot behind the wheel of the No. 84 Dallara, as well as Pristine Auction for their continued support in my racing career. I can’t wait to get to Iowa Speedway.”

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Mercedes, Ferrari go conservative on Austrian GP tire picks

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Pirelli has confirmed all 20 Formula 1 drivers’ tire picks for next weekend’s Austrian Grand Prix at the Red Bull Ring in Spielberg, with most opting to stack up on ultra-softs.

As it does for every grand prix, Pirelli will bring three compounds to Austria next week, electing for the softest possible combination of ultra-soft, super-soft and soft tires.

In the regular pre-race release of each driver’s tire picks, Pirelli revealed that Force India, McLaren and Red Bull have gone down the most aggressive routes, stacking up on the ultra-soft tire.

Title contenders Mercedes and Ferrari have gone down a more conservative route, favoring additional sets of the super-soft compound.

Ferrari drivers Sebastian Vettel and Kimi Raikkonen will take seven sets of ultra-softs to Spielberg, while Mercedes’ Lewis Hamilton and Valtteri Bottas will have eight sets at their disposal through the weekend.

Graham Rahal survives Road America to finish eighth

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Graham Rahal and Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing faced a roller coaster of a race during the Kohler Grand Prix at Road America on Sunday.

He was a rocket off the initial start, jumping from sixth on the grid up to fourth exiting turn 1, but was almost immediately ordered to surrender a position for blocking. He quickly slipped back to sixth, and then began plummeting down the order as he battled an oversteer condition that saw his car chew through its rear tires more quickly than others.

Forced to abandon the planned three-stop strategy, he and the No. 15 Gehl Honda team switched to a four-stop plan that saw him drop well outside the top ten at times.

However, they kept plugging away and rebounded nicely in the second half of the race to eventually finish in eighth. While he would have liked to finish higher up the order, Rahal knows that he and the team got everything they could out of it.

“The car was a handful today. I knew about five laps in that I didn’t have the pace for a three-stop strategy,” Rahal revealed post-race. “We tried as best we could to work with what we had during the race and overcome it. I would have obviously liked to have finished better, but eighth is about as good as we could do today. We struggled with a very loose race car all weekend and just couldn’t put a dent in the problem. We worked awfully hard but just missed it this weekend.”

The eighth-place finish keeps Rahal in the championship hunt. Rahal now sits seventh in the standings, 11 points behind fifth-place Josef Newgarden and 72 behind championship leader Scott Dixon.

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Ed Jones continues steady run with seventh at Road America

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Dale Coyne Racing’s Ed Jones has made waves in the 2017 Verizon IndyCar Series season with a string of solid performances that belie his rookie status.

And Sunday’s Kohler Grand Prix at Road America was no different.

The 22-year-old battled an oversteering car most of the weekend at Road America, and had to navigate a little carnage late in the race as Alexander Rossi and Ryan Hunter-Reay both fell through the field with front wing problems.

However, Jones weathered all storms to finish an impressive seventh, his fifth finish inside the top 10 this year, and his best finish since his third place at the 101st Indianapolis 500 presented by PennGrade MotorOil.

“It was a really tough race,” Jones said of the effort. “We had a loose car yesterday. It was loose, but fast, for qualifying, and today again the car was really loose. I was hanging on the whole race, but the team had some good pit stops and we were able to move up.

“Obviously, the strategy was pretty similar to everyone else. Everyone was aggressive out there. It was hard racing but we came out with a seventh place and we moved up a little bit in the points.”

The seventh-place run sees Jones maintain his position in the top ten in the championship. He currently sits tenth in the standings, three points ahead of Chip Ganassi Racing’s Max Chilton.

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