F1 Fan - Austin

Haas has the green light, but there’s a long road ahead


After months of rumors, paperwork and deliberations, it was formally confirmed yesterday by the FIA that Gene Haas’ proposed Formula 1 team had been given the green light, and as a result a berth on the grid for the 2015 season. Cue jubilation for American fans of the sport: a home team might be lining up at the Circuit of the Americas in fall 2015, and perhaps an American driver might be behind the wheel of one of its cars.

Undoubtedly, this news is fantastic for Formula 1 in the United States, but there is still a long road ahead of Haas and his team.

The initial plans are yet to be formally confirmed, but Haas is poised to set up a European base for his team that will work in tandem with operations in the United States. Of course, one of the big challenges for any team based in North America is the sheer distance of travelling for a largely European season. It is for this reason that most of the teams choose to set up shop in the UK.

Haas is thought to be considering a location in Italy for his team, as it is set to enjoy some ties with Ferrari. The Italian marque is poised to supply engines to the team, and it could be that this allows the team to put its junior drivers in a race seat at Haas. Raffaele Marciello is currently Ferrari’s leading light outside of F1, and might be their pick for a drive with the team. Another possible option could be James Calado, who has recently signed with Ferrari’s AF Corse GT team for the World Endurance Championship after finishing third in GP2 last year.

In terms of the management, former Red Bull team principal Gunther Steiner will work as the team principal with Haas taking up the role of chairman. The chassis is set to be designed by Dallara, who last worked with HRT F1 Team in Formula 1. The team’s lack of success with its chassis was because it could not pay Dallara for regular updates, so it is perhaps not the best example of the designer’s work.

Although distance isn’t such an issue, timing certainly is. The tender from the FIA does allow the team to line up in the grid in 2015, but the season is just 11 months away, with testing starting a month before that. It is a short amount of time and a big challenge for Haas and his team, but if the stars align and there is a big enough push, it is entirely possible. Should the team fall short, 2016 is still an option. Next year isn’t ‘all or nothing.’

Of course, the last time that an American team was poised to join the grid was USF1’s failed entry back in 2009 and 2010. As a result, the skeptics (of which there are many) have immediately pointed at this and said “I’ll believe it when I see it.”

The big difference here is that with Haas, a successful racing team and automotive company is in place; it already exists. It is not a privateer team as such (i.e. an entry requiring backing), but instead an outfit that has already met considerable success in NASCAR, with Haas being co-owner of Stewart-Haas Racing.

If we forget the possible connection to Ferrari for a second, the drivers already in the race will be Alexander Rossi and Conor Daly. Both drivers are fantastic talents and the finest American drivers on the F1 ladder. However, the rumor mill will predictably throw drivers currently racing in IndyCar into the mix. As with any new team, it will relieve some of the pressure that has existed in the driver market – i.e. too many good drivers for too few seats – over the past few years.

And there is also the question about whether Haas will indeed be the 12th team on the grid. Caterham owner Tony Fernandes has suggested he could quit the sport if the team doesn’t start improving soon, and Marussia has also undergone a change in ownership of late. Lotus and Sauber also hit financial problems last year, and although the latter’s have now been resolved, the issues at Enstone are still very real.

Furthermore, a team called Forza Rossa is still being considered by the FIA for a berth on the grid, which is a Romanian Ferrari dealer that has links to former F1 team principal Colin Kolles.

The road ahead of Haas and co. is long, yet this is a different animal to USF1. Cautious optimism is what we should have when talking about an American Formula 1 team led by Gene Haas, but it would certainly be great to see his cars line up on the grid for the 2015 United States Grand Prix.

Raikkonen learned “pretty much nothing” in Sochi practice

xxxx during practice for the Formula One Grand Prix of Russia at Sochi Autodrom on October 9, 2015 in Sochi, Russia.
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Kimi Raikkonen made no secret of his frustration following practice for the Russian Grand Prix on Friday after losing the majority of the day’s running at the Sochi Autodrom.

A diesel spill on the track ahead of the first free practice session cost the field 30 minutes of running, while heavy rain made much of FP2 a fruitless exercise.

Speaking after Friday’s sessions, Raikkonen admitted that Ferrari had learned very little due to the conditions, but said that the team will try to make the best of the situation.

“Today the weather conditions were not very nice,” Raikkonen said. “We could not get much running and we learned pretty much nothing.

“The first practice was dry, but at the beginning of the session there was an issue with the tarmac surface and they had to wash it away. So we lost time and when we got to the track some parts were still wet.

“In the second session, the weather turned out to be a bit tricky and it rained most of the time. It’s one of those days you do absolutely nothing but that’s how it goes.

“It was not ideal today but it was the same for everybody. Hopefully tomorrow it will be dry, and we’ll see how the tires work. We’ll do our normal program and try to make the best out of it.”

Teammate Sebastian Vettel finished third in FP1 and second in FP2, but thinks he may struggle to find any rhythm ahead of qualifying on Saturday after losing most of today’s running.

“Today we did learn a few things, but nothing that we can really use for the weekend,” Vettel said. “The first impression of the car is good, but I can’t really say a lot more as we really didn’t get enough track action today.

“This morning we couldn’t drive much as some of the corners were covered with diesel fuel, and it took a while to clean it all up. In the afternoon it started raining, but tomorrow and Sunday it is supposed to be dry!

“In general, it won’t be easy to get into the right rhythm, as the track tomorrow will feel the same like yesterday – that is, green and with poor grip. Usually, you use the Friday to lay some rubber down, but that was not possible today.”

The Russian Grand Prix is live on NBCSN and Live Extra this weekend. For full broadcast details, click here.

IndyCar 2015 Driver Review: Carlos Munoz

Carlos Munoz
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MotorSportsTalk continues its run through the driver-by-driver roster in this year’s Verizon IndyCar Series. Next up in 13th is Carlos Munoz, who fell back to earth a bit after winning Indianapolis 500, then series rookie-of-the-year honors in consecutive years.

Carlos Munoz, No. 26 Andretti Autosport Honda

  • 2014: 8th Place, Best Finish 3rd, Best Start 3rd, 3 Podiums, 5 Top-5, 8 Top-10, 0 Laps Led, 10.5 Avg. Start, 12.6 Avg. Finish
  • 2015: 13th Place, 1 Win, Best Start 4th, 1 Podium, 3 Top-5, 7 Top-10, 25 Laps Led, 14.0 Avg. Start, 12.1 Avg. Finish

Munoz fell down to earth a little bit in his second full season in IndyCar, albeit not as badly as fellow 2014 rookie Jack Hawksworth, who’d switched teams and had a myriad of issues throughout the season. He won his first race in the rain at Detroit race one, which was well judged, but there were precious other highlights from the driver who has showcased “wow” potential in the past.

His qualifying fell off year-to-year and that was probably the single thing to pinpoint as to why the decline occurred, falling from eighth to 13th in points. What had been a 10.5 average in 2014 fell to 14th this year, and behind teammates Marco Andretti and Ryan Hunter-Reay.

Ovals seemed his strongest type of circuit this year on the whole. Like teammate Justin Wilson, he’d been in position to score what would have been his third straight Indianapolis 500 top-five finish if a late splash of fuel wasn’t needed. Sixth at Texas from fourth on the grid marked his best overall weekend of the year, and fifth at Iowa and Pocono were also fairly good results.

But whereas Munoz picked his spots well last year and delivered a handful of podiums, his Detroit win marked his only podium visit this year. He didn’t really make much of an impression and was more anonymous than not over the course of the year. His future with Andretti is uncertain for 2016.