Richmond’s personal for Daniel Knost, Kurt Busch’s crew chief

Leave a comment

It sounds like Stewart-Haas Racing crew chief Daniel Knost still feels that Richmond International Raceway owes him one.

Before taking on his current role atop Kurt Busch’s pit box for 2014, Knost was the lead race engineer for Ryan Newman (now at Richard Childress Racing) and last fall at RIR, it looked like Newman was set to win and make the Chase for the Sprint Cup.

But Clint Bowyer’s controversial spin with seven laps to go brought out the caution and sent all the leaders to pit road. Newman lost the lead in the final round of stops and while he claimed a third-place result, he lost out on a Chase bid via tie-breaker to Martin Truex Jr.

Newman was eventually elevated into the Chase after Truex was booted out as part of NASCAR’s penalties against Michael Waltrip Racing for attempting to manipulate the race’s finish.

But in the immediate aftermath, Knost and the rest of his team were forced to watch as the Chase contenders celebrated their post-season berths. The bad taste in his mouth hasn’t appeared to have gone away.

“Once we got into the position we needed to be in, we told Ryan, ‘Hey man, we think we can win.’ So he went out there and got it done and put us in front,” Knost recalled recently. “We played all the right cards at all the right times, but then we felt like it got taken away from us.

“It was really disappointing to know we were on the verge of completing this big, season-long goal that we had and done all the right things, but then have it get away from us the way it did. It was very disappointing emotionally to walk out of the track that night and see the celebration going on and know that you should be a part of that and you’re not.”

This time around, Knost returns to Richmond with the knowledge that his No. 41 team is effectively in the Chase thanks to Busch’s victory at Martinsville.

But a second victory would just about seal the deal as it has for SHR teammate Kevin Harvick, who earned his second win of 2014 two weekends ago at Darlington.

And to do such a thing with Busch on Saturday night at Richmond would probably be very sweet indeed for Knost considering what he and his crewmates went through last fall.

Position of F1 start lights altered to compensate for safety halo

Getty Images
Leave a comment

MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) — The position of start lights will be altered on Formula One tracks this season, in a bid to ensure the drivers’ line of vision is not impeded by the controversial halo protection device.

The halo is a titanium structure introduced this year in a bid to ramp up driver safety, forming a ring around the cockpit top. It is designed to protect the drivers’ head from loose debris and offer better safety during eventual collisions.

Although drivers largely understand the need for it, very few like it. They are worried it impedes visibility, it looks ugly and also that fans will no longer be able to identify a driver properly from his race helmet. Drivers also take longer to climb in and out of their cars.

Formula One’s governing body has addressed concerns and asked every circuit “to make the lights at a standard height above the track,” FIA race director Charlie Whiting said.

“Pole position seems to be the worst case scenario with the halo,” Whiting added at the season-opening Australian GP. “Maybe the driver can’t quite see the lights, or see only half of them, and he might have to move his head too much.”

The new start lights were positioned lower for Friday’s first two practice sessions at Albert Park. Drivers were also allowed the rare chance to rehearse grid starts at the end of both sessions.

“We haven’t normally allowed practice starts on the grid here because it’s quite a tight timetable,” Whiting said. “What I thought would be a good idea was to give the driver sight of those lights, rather than for the first time on Sunday evening.”

A repeat set of lights has been moved from its usual position halfway up the grid to a more convenient position to the left.

“Those repeat lights were normally halfway up the grid, and they were fitted round about 2009, when the rear wings became higher on the cars,” Whiting said. “But now the wings have been lowered, there’s no need for those halfway up the grid.”