Richmond’s personal for Daniel Knost, Kurt Busch’s crew chief

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It sounds like Stewart-Haas Racing crew chief Daniel Knost still feels that Richmond International Raceway owes him one.

Before taking on his current role atop Kurt Busch’s pit box for 2014, Knost was the lead race engineer for Ryan Newman (now at Richard Childress Racing) and last fall at RIR, it looked like Newman was set to win and make the Chase for the Sprint Cup.

But Clint Bowyer’s controversial spin with seven laps to go brought out the caution and sent all the leaders to pit road. Newman lost the lead in the final round of stops and while he claimed a third-place result, he lost out on a Chase bid via tie-breaker to Martin Truex Jr.

Newman was eventually elevated into the Chase after Truex was booted out as part of NASCAR’s penalties against Michael Waltrip Racing for attempting to manipulate the race’s finish.

But in the immediate aftermath, Knost and the rest of his team were forced to watch as the Chase contenders celebrated their post-season berths. The bad taste in his mouth hasn’t appeared to have gone away.

“Once we got into the position we needed to be in, we told Ryan, ‘Hey man, we think we can win.’ So he went out there and got it done and put us in front,” Knost recalled recently. “We played all the right cards at all the right times, but then we felt like it got taken away from us.

“It was really disappointing to know we were on the verge of completing this big, season-long goal that we had and done all the right things, but then have it get away from us the way it did. It was very disappointing emotionally to walk out of the track that night and see the celebration going on and know that you should be a part of that and you’re not.”

This time around, Knost returns to Richmond with the knowledge that his No. 41 team is effectively in the Chase thanks to Busch’s victory at Martinsville.

But a second victory would just about seal the deal as it has for SHR teammate Kevin Harvick, who earned his second win of 2014 two weekends ago at Darlington.

And to do such a thing with Busch on Saturday night at Richmond would probably be very sweet indeed for Knost considering what he and his crewmates went through last fall.

F1 2017 driver review: Lewis Hamilton

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Following on from the driver reviews from the Verizon IndyCar Series, MotorSportsTalk kicks off its Formula 1 recaps by looking back on Lewis Hamilton’s championship year.

Lewis Hamilton

Team: Mercedes AMG Petronas
Car No.: 44
Races: 20
Wins: 9
Podiums (excluding wins): 4
Pole Positions: 11
Fastest Laps: 7
Points: 363
Laps Led: 527
Championship Position: 1st

Lewis Hamilton may have wrapped up his fourth Formula 1 world title with two races to spare, but his margin of victory was far from representative of what was arguably his greatest championship victory yet.

Mercedes entered 2017 bidding to become the first team to defend its titles across a seismic regulation change, and appeared to be on the back foot early on after Ferrari impressed in pre-season testing and won the opening race through Sebastian Vettel.

Hamilton was left wrestling with a “diva” of a car, as coined by Mercedes team boss Toto Wolff, but was able to get on top of it by the second race of the year in China, taking a dominant win in wet-dry conditions.

The win was representative of Hamilton’s form through the first portion of the season. When he won, he won in style – as in Spain, Canada and on home soil in Great Britain – but the off weekends saw him struggle.

Heading into the summer break, Vettel’s championship lead stood at 14 points, with the pair’s on-track rivalry having already spilled over in Baku when they made contact behind the safety car.

But Hamilton then produced the form that propelled him to titles in 2014 and 2015, breaking the back of the season through the final flyaways. As Vettel and Ferrari capitulated over the Asian rounds, picking up just 12 points when a full score of 75 for three wins was certainly in reach, Hamilton capitalised and put himself on the brink of the title.

While Hamilton’s run to P9 in Mexico was a messy way to wrap up his hardest-fought title to date, getting across the line and the job done was a significant result.

Unlike his last two titles, Hamilton was tasked with an enemy outside of the team in this title race and a car that arguably wasn’t the fastest on the grid.

But his unquestionable talent and ability to dig deep to get himself out of tough situations – Singapore and Brazil being two key examples where the result was far from expected – proved crucial once again.

Hamilton is now in the annals of F1 history as one of its all-time greats. The pole record is his, and only two drivers can boast more world titles than him (Michael Schumacher and Juan Manuel Fangio).

Depending on how long he wants to continue racing, going down as F1’s statistical all-time great is certainly not out of the realm of possibility.

Season High: Charging from the pit lane to P4 in Brazil, a race he could have even won.

Season Low: Dropping out in Q2 in Monaco, only recovering to P7 in the race.