Trevor Bayne spends off-weekend racing and winning in a different way

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The next time someone says they doubt that NASCAR drivers are athletes, show them this story.

NASCAR Nationwide Series driver and 2011 Daytona 500 winner Trevor Bayne spent the Easter off-weekend competing in a different type of race – and he wound up winning.

In just his second career sprint triathlon (also known as a short-distance triathlon that features a 750-meter swim, 20k-bike ride and a 5k-run), Bayne captured the TryCharleston sprint triathlon in South Carolina.

Bayne finished first in his age group – males 20 to 24 years old – with a personal best time of 1:10:21.

“It was a lot of fun,” Bayne said in a Roush Fenway Racing media release. “The weather didn’t really cooperate … but it went well. I won my age group – which was cool – and definitely improved my sprint-tri time.

“I improved my time by 12 minutes from my first event in Key West, and ended up 30th overall, which is pretty good out of over 200 people.”

Bayne’s outstanding performance in the tri was indicative of the kind of season he’s also having on the racetrack, with six top-10 finishes in seven Nationwide starts this season.

The driver of the No. 6 AdvoCare Ford Mustang looks to make it seven top-10s – and potentially a win – in Friday’s NNS race at Richmond International Raceway. Bayne has two top-five and three top-10 finishes in six starts at the .75-mile track.

Bayne has always been a fitness buff, but has ratcheted up his conditioning over the last year with increased workouts, healthier eating and the like. He’s also taken a lot of cues from mega-buff fitness nut and RFR teammate Carl Edwards.

“I think the more physically and mentally sharp you can be in the race car the better off you are,” Bayne said. “I think the training has gotten me much more physically fit for the race.

“If you can run or ride your bike or run outside for a couple of hours, it really helps you stay sharp focused as well. You are mentally stronger at the end of the race and you are able to make good decisions throughout the race.”

With a positive outlook like that, could a workout video starring Bayne be too far behind?

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F1 2017 driver review: Max Verstappen

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Max Verstappen

Team: Red Bull Racing
Car No.: 33
Races: 20
Wins: 2
Podiums (excluding wins): 2
Pole Positions: 0
Fastest Laps: 1
Points: 168
Laps Led: 133
Championship Position: 6th

Max Verstappen rise as a once-in-a-generation talent continued through the 2017 Formula 1 season, even if reliability issues meant we were made to wait for his best form to arrive.

Verstappen stole the show in a wet-dry Chinese Grand Prix by charging from 16th to seventh in the opening lap before ultimately finishing third for Red Bull, yet he would not grace the podium again until the Malaysian Grand Prix at the start of October.

A combination of power unit problems and on-track clashes saw Verstappen retire from seven of the 12 races in the intermittent period, with incidents in Spain and Austria being avoidable.

Perhaps most embarrassing of all was his stoppage due to a power unit failure in front of a grandstand swathed in orange at the Belgian Grand Prix, a race tens of thousands of Dutch fans had attended to cheer Verstappen on.

But when Verstappen got things right, it was – as he frequently quoted – simply, simply lovely. There was plenty left in the tank, as proven by his sheer domination of the races in Malaysia and Mexico as he took the second and third wins of his career.

Perhaps even more impressive was Verstappen’s victory over Red Bull teammate Daniel Ricciardo in the qualifying head-to-head battle this year, an area the Australian has traditionally been strong in. Verstappen outqualifed his teammate 13-7 – it wasn’t even close…

All in all, Verstappen once again proved that on his day, he is one of the finest talents to grace F1 in recent years. With the right car underneath him next year, a title fight is certainly possible and will be the target – but there is always room for improvement.

And that is the scary part: Verstappen is only going to get better and better.

Season High: Dominating in Malaysia after an early pass on Lewis Hamilton.

Season Low: Crashing out on Lap 1 in Austria.