IndyCar: Trio of partner updates for Rahal, Newgarden, Bell

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Three brief sponsor and technology updates for drivers in the Verizon IndyCar Series:

  • Graham Rahal’s No. 15 National Guard Honda will see Google Glass technology utilized in IndyCar for the first time, with four of his crewmembers set to wear it during pit stops at Wednesday’s Indianapolis Motor Speedway. RLL is partnering with Kansas City, Mo.-based Engage Mobile Solutions to provide the first-person, real-time perspective. More here from an Engage Mobile release.
  • Klipsch Audio, an Indianapolis-based premium speakers and headphones company, will serve as primary sponsor for Josef Newgarden’s No. 67 Sarah Fisher Hartman Racing entry (see picture, right) for the Grand Prix of Indianapolis. “Bringing Klipsch as the primary sponsor to the inaugural Grand Prix will be fantastic, especially with its headquarters here and the excitement around that particular event. We are thankful for their increased involvement and know both SFHR and Klipsch will share the benefits of this great partnership in Indianapolis!” said SFHR team co-owner Sarah Fisher.
  • Townsend Bell’s No. 6 KV Racing Technology entry for the Indianapolis 500 continues to gain partners. Primary sponsor Robert Graham and associate Beneteau have already been announced; Royal Purple was confirmed on Monday. “It is really cool that they have added their support to my Indy 500 effort in addition to their support of my TUDOR United SportsCar Championship AIM Autosport Ferrari program. I just want to thank everyone at Royal Purple and I look forward to enjoying the whole Indy 500 experience with their employees and customers,” Bell said in a release.

Social roundup: Racing world largely outraged by Verstappen penalty

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The discussion over Max Verstappen’s post-race five-second time penalty assessed in Sunday’s United States Grand Prix, issued when he tried to the inside of Kimi Raikkonen at the Turns 16, 17 and 18 carousel complex at Circuit of The Americas, will roll on far beyond today.

The debate today largely centered over consistency in adjudication and application of the rules, track limits themselves (always a sore subject at COTA given its wide runoff areas) or whether there should be permanent stewards.

In the immediate aftermath, though, Twitter lit up with outrage over Verstappen being assessed a five-second post-race time penalty.

Here’s a mere sampling of the reaction, below.