Kurt Busch passes Indy 500 Rookie Orientation Program (VIDEO)

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Yesterday, NASCAR Sprint Cup Series driver Kurt Busch called his attempt to run the Indianapolis 500 and Coca-Cola 600 an “amazing challenge.”

Today, that challenge began at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, where Busch strapped into his No. 26 Andretti Autosport Honda and worked through the three-phase Rookie Orientation Program that all ‘500’ first-timers must pass.

Afternoon rains curtailed the day’s proceedings at IMS, but not before “The Outlaw” had completed his ROP. He ran 66 circuits around the 2.5-mile oval, setting a fast lap of 220.844 miles per hour.

Busch’s outing drew some interested observers to the Speedway, including his Andretti teammates Ryan Hunter-Reay, Marco Andretti, and James Hinchcliffe, as well as a horde of media.

“It really makes you think,” Busch said. “Overall, it was a good day just to settle in with the team and advance further than rookie orientation. It felt good to give feedback to the team from the car and have them explain things to me how we’re going to move forward.

“They continued to change downforce combinations on the car and it was just neat to feel all that and check it off the list. The last run we made was just about where they would unload for race trim.”

Busch is aiming to become the fourth driver ever to race in both the Indy 500 and Coke 600 on the same day, and the second driver to finish all 1,100 miles; his NASCAR teammate and boss, Tony Stewart, completed that feat in 2001 for Chip Ganassi Racing at the ‘500’ and Joe Gibbs Racing at the ‘600.’

Last May at Indy, Busch tested an Andretti machine, running 83 laps with a fast lap at 218.210 miles per hour. In that test, he passed a simulated version of the ROP.

But now that he’s passed the official ROP, Busch is cleared to take part in official ‘500’ practice, which begins on May 11, one day after the Sprint Cup race at Kansas Speedway.

He is also slated to take additional laps at Indy with the other ‘500’ rookies on May 5.

“Now that all the newness and moments of smiling and ‘this is Indy’ are wearing off, that’s when the serious hat goes on and we start to ramp up the program,” said Busch.

Have a decent tax refund coming? Buy Ayrton Senna’s 1993 Monaco-winning car

Photos courtesy Bonhams
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Are you expecting a better than normal tax refund? Did you get a very nice bonus from your company due to the new tax cut?

Well, if you have a good chunk of change hanging around and potentially can be in Monaco on May 11, you can have a chance to bid on the 1993 McLaren-Ford MP4/8A that the late Ayrton Senna drove in — and won — that year’s Monaco Grand Prix.

We’re not just talking about any race winner. It’s also the same car Senna won his sixth Monaco Grand Prix, and the chassis bears the number six.

It’s also the same car Senna piloted to that season’s F1 championship (his third and final title before sadly being killed the next year) and is the first McLaren driven by Senna that’s ever been sold or put up for auction.

The famed Bonhams auction house is overseeing the sale of the car.

“Any Grand Prix-winning car is important, but to have the golden combination of both Senna and Monaco is a seriously rare privilege indeed,” Bonhams global head of motorsport, Mark Osborne, told The Robb Report.

“Senna and Monaco are historically intertwined, and this car represents the culmination of his achievements at the Monegasque track. This is one of the most significant Grand Prix cars ever to appear at auction, and is certainly the most significant Grand Prix car to be offered since the Fangio Mercedes-Benz W196R, which sold for a world record at auction.”

How much might you need? You might want to get a couple of friends to throw in a few bucks as well.

“We expect the car to achieve a considerable seven-figure sum,” Osborne said.

The London newspaper “The Telegraph” predicts the car will sell in the $6.1 million range.”

“This car will set the world record for a Senna car at auction,” Osborne said. “We are as certain as you can be in the auction world.”

While you won’t be able to take the car for a test drive before the auction, it’ll be ready to roar once you pay the price.

“In theory, the buyer could be racing immediately upon receipt of the cleared funds after the auction,” Osborne said. “All systems are primed and ready.”