Ryan Newman looking for the “follow-through” at Kansas

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Currently sitting in the Top 10 in NASCAR Sprint Cup Series points, Ryan Newman believes that the performance from himself and his No. 31 Richard Childress Racing team has been solid.

But he also believes that something’s been missing. He calls it the “follow-through.” Some may call it “execution,” but not him.

“We haven’t been the fastest and we’re not leading the most laps or anything like that, but we’re putting ourselves in contention,” he said today at Kansas. “What we haven’t done is seal-up the contention that we were holding; just that follow-through.

“I don’t want to call it ‘execution’; I want to call it the ‘follow-through’ of where we are. And finishing it off hasn’t been 100 percent or as good as I think it should or could be. So, when we’re running seventh, we finish 10th. And when we’re running fifth, we finish seventh.”

Newman’s claimed four Top-10s this year but only has a top finish of seventh, which he’s turned in twice already at Phoenix and Las Vegas back in the early spring. On the other side of the coin, he’s only had one finish outside of the Top 20.

However, with a win effectively meaning “You’re in” as far as making the Chase for the Sprint Cup, consistency won’t be enough.

Hence, Newman’s need to get that “follow-through” starting with tomorrow’s 5-Hour Energy 400.

“We just need to shine-up the performance a little bit with respect to finishing it and not just how we’re running in the middle of the race,” he said.

As for what he’s expecting in Kansas’ first-ever Sprint Cup night race, Newman is hoping for the track’s groove to widen out but isn’t sure that tonight’s 250-mile Camping World Truck Series race will be enough to do the job.

However, he feels that with the early evening start time for tomorrow’s race, there will be an opportunity to help the groove get farther up the track and provide himself and the other drivers with more room to race.

“With a 6:30 p.m. [CT] start time, the sun will still be out and there is a chance to put a little bit of rubber on the track and hopefully that will make a big difference,” he said. “When we’re out there, it’s barely two grooves wide now. I’m saying two car widths, not two grooves.

“So it’s really going to be dictated by that. Once we widen out the race track and have double-file restarts and that part of it – I just don’t see the Trucks really making the track that much wider just because of their speed and the quantity and quality of the trucks that are out there.”

NHRA Gatornationals: John Force has another spectacular motor explosion

Photo courtesy NHRA
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Legendary NHRA Funny Car driver John Force endured yet another spectacular motor explosion – his third in the NHRA’s first three national event races – during Friday’s qualifying at the Amalie Motor Oil Gatornationals in Gainesville, Florida.

It’s the kind of consistency the 16-time NHRA Funny Car champ could do without.

The 68-year-old Force came to Gainesville hoping to break the jinx that saw him endure explosions in both the season-opening Winternationals and the second race of the season in Phoenix.

Both motor explosions sent Force to the hospital for examination before he returned to the race track.

Friday, even though the motor in his Chevrolet Camaro blew up again (in the second round of qualifying), at least this time, Force didn’t wind up in the hospital.

He did have his right hand bandaged from a cut suffered in the explosion, but did not have to go to the hospital this time.

He even joked about not having to add yet another ambulance bill to the nearest Gainesville hospital.

But the explosion still proved costly.

“That was another body and that hurts the financial (bottomline),” Force said. “I was out $500,000 to $600,000, and now we are probably out $800,000, going on a million. In drag racing, you have to be tough.”

He ended the day qualifying 14th, not a very comfortable position with two more rounds of qualifying set for Saturday.

Force continues to be mystified why the motors keep exploding.

“I really thought we had it, I thought we were there,” Force said. “In the first round we drove it 500 feet and shut it off. It looked great. We ran it again that run and I was only going to drive it 800 feet even if we didn’t make The Show.”

Force will attempt to improve his qualifying spot during Saturday’s final two rounds to make Sunday’s eliminations.

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