Is the idea of a cost cap in Formula 1 really dead?


As costs continual to spiral in Formula 1, there has been a long-running push for a limit on how much teams spend to be put in place. Many efforts have been made, but all have failed, and with the teams recently meeting to discuss their options, one big question has arisen: is it really possible?

At yesterday’s FIA team principals’ press conference, some interesting figures were asked to attend. Marussia, Caterham, Force India, Sauber and Toro Rosso were all represented by their team bosses, and predictably, questions about the cost cap and the newly-formed F1 Strategy Group came up.

What separates some of these teams from the rest of the field is there backing. Whilst Ferrari and Mercedes have their successful road car sales funding them, and Red Bull has millions of little cans of fizzy drink that give you a kick, the likes of Force India and Sauber have nothing they can actively sell to fund their racing. They exist to race in Formula 1.

So for the cost cap, it’s unsurprising that it is these ‘privateer’ teams that are in favor.

“I don’t believe the cost cap is dead,” Force India’s Bob Fernley explained. “I think as far as we’re concerned it’s still in the hands of the FIA to progress what was unanimously approved and we will do our very best to support other measures that can go in line, but I think you need the two.”

Monisha Kaltenborn of Sauber shares this view. “I don’t think it’s dead because first of all, as it’s been said already, there is a unanimous decision and I think it is very much possible to police it,” she said. “We, at Sauber, definitely could live with a system where you first of all come into with trust, and not the lack of trust, and say if the teams put in the figures and you have a certain actual policing system.

“It can work, we’ve been saying that for long and I think it is very much doable.”

The only person in the press conference who was against the cost cap was Franz Tost, Toro Rosso team principal. The team is, of course, owned by Red Bull (“Toro Rosso” in Italian literally means “Red Bull”), and therefore has less to worry about financially.

“For me the cost cap is dead,” Tost said. “Because the top teams don’t accept it. It’s also complicated for them and as long as auditors are not allowed to look into the books it’s useless to make a cost cap.”

Tost’s skepticism is disappointing given that the team he runs used to be Minardi – the legendary backmarker team in Formula 1 – who would have been jumping for joy at the prospect of a cost cap. However, his point is certainly a valid one. For the likes of Ferrari and Mercedes, it is very difficult to define where development differs between the road cars and the F1 projects.

It appears that the murmurs about a cost cap are set to continue, but a solution may be a long way off. The demise of FOTA and the formation of the F1 Strategy Group – essentially an exclusive club only for the big teams – has not aided matters.

Ferrari teammates Vettel and Raikkonen fastest in rainy final practice at Australian GP

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MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) — Ferrari drivers Sebastian Vettel and Kimi Raikkonen went one-two in the final practice session ahead of qualifying at the water-logged Australian Grand Prix on Saturday.

Vettel set a best-lap time of 1 minute, 26.067 seconds, more than 2.4 seconds faster than his teammate in second.

Both Ferrari drivers switched from their intermediate tires to the super-fast, ultra-soft tires for the final few laps of the session, testing conditions on the track after a day-long downpour left it slick and filled with small puddles.

Mercedes drivers Valtteri Bottas and Lewis Hamilton did not opt to try out their soft tires, sticking to the intermediates for the entire session. They had the seventh- and eighth-fastest times, after topping the leaderboard in practice in dry conditions on Friday.

The heavy rains subsided by early afternoon, allowing the track to rapidly dry during the third practice session and making conditions safe for drivers to test their soft tires.

Still, only a few drivers completed a timed lap with the softer compounds, with Mercedes, Red Bull and most of the others staying with their intermediates.

Sauber’s Marcus Ericsson had the third-fastest time of the session on ultrasoft tires, followed by Red Bull’s Max Verstappen on intermediates.

Hamilton remains the favorite to capture his fifth straight pole position at the Australian Grand Prix in qualifying later Saturday. He had the fastest laps on ultrasoft tires in the two practice sessions on Friday, though Verstappen was right behind him.

Verstappen and Vettel both slid on the slick track early in the third practice session, but maintained control and completed their runs without incident.

Verstappen’s teammate, Daniel Ricciardo, had the sixth-fastest time of the session. The Australian’s chances of winning his fifth career Grand Prix on his home track in Melbourne took a hit late Friday when he was assessed a three-place grid penalty for Sunday’s race.

The Australian driver was penalized for driving too fast under red-flag conditions during Friday’s second practice session because of debris on the track.