Is the idea of a cost cap in Formula 1 really dead?

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As costs continual to spiral in Formula 1, there has been a long-running push for a limit on how much teams spend to be put in place. Many efforts have been made, but all have failed, and with the teams recently meeting to discuss their options, one big question has arisen: is it really possible?

At yesterday’s FIA team principals’ press conference, some interesting figures were asked to attend. Marussia, Caterham, Force India, Sauber and Toro Rosso were all represented by their team bosses, and predictably, questions about the cost cap and the newly-formed F1 Strategy Group came up.

What separates some of these teams from the rest of the field is there backing. Whilst Ferrari and Mercedes have their successful road car sales funding them, and Red Bull has millions of little cans of fizzy drink that give you a kick, the likes of Force India and Sauber have nothing they can actively sell to fund their racing. They exist to race in Formula 1.

So for the cost cap, it’s unsurprising that it is these ‘privateer’ teams that are in favor.

“I don’t believe the cost cap is dead,” Force India’s Bob Fernley explained. “I think as far as we’re concerned it’s still in the hands of the FIA to progress what was unanimously approved and we will do our very best to support other measures that can go in line, but I think you need the two.”

Monisha Kaltenborn of Sauber shares this view. “I don’t think it’s dead because first of all, as it’s been said already, there is a unanimous decision and I think it is very much possible to police it,” she said. “We, at Sauber, definitely could live with a system where you first of all come into with trust, and not the lack of trust, and say if the teams put in the figures and you have a certain actual policing system.

“It can work, we’ve been saying that for long and I think it is very much doable.”

The only person in the press conference who was against the cost cap was Franz Tost, Toro Rosso team principal. The team is, of course, owned by Red Bull (“Toro Rosso” in Italian literally means “Red Bull”), and therefore has less to worry about financially.

“For me the cost cap is dead,” Tost said. “Because the top teams don’t accept it. It’s also complicated for them and as long as auditors are not allowed to look into the books it’s useless to make a cost cap.”

Tost’s skepticism is disappointing given that the team he runs used to be Minardi – the legendary backmarker team in Formula 1 – who would have been jumping for joy at the prospect of a cost cap. However, his point is certainly a valid one. For the likes of Ferrari and Mercedes, it is very difficult to define where development differs between the road cars and the F1 projects.

It appears that the murmurs about a cost cap are set to continue, but a solution may be a long way off. The demise of FOTA and the formation of the F1 Strategy Group – essentially an exclusive club only for the big teams – has not aided matters.

Danica Patrick to sign off driving career at 2018 Indy 500

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With her full-time career in the Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series now coming to an end, following the end of the 2017 season this weekend at Homestead-Miami Speedway, Danica Patrick is embarking on a new path in 2018 with the two biggest 500-mile races in North America.

Patrick confirmed plans to participate in North America’s most marquee 500-mile races, the Daytona 500 and Indianapolis 500, during a press conference today in Miami. A team for the Indianapolis 500 has not been determined, and her options for the Daytona 500 are limited to NASCAR teams with three or fewer full-time cars, because a four-car full-time team cannot enter a fifth for the Daytona 500.

Patrick ended her full-time career in IndyCar after 2011 to head to NASCAR. She drove 10 races in 2012 before her first full Cup season in 2013, where she won the pole for that year’s Daytona 500 and ultimately finished eighth.

Her Cup career has seen her finish between 24th and 28th in points with seven career top-10 finishes, all between sixth and 10th place. She ranks 27th heading into this week’s finale too.

It was her IndyCar career though where she first entered the national conversation after a few years of apprenticeship driving for Bobby Rahal’s Barber Dodge and Formula Atlantic teams. A fourth place finish in the 2005 Indianapolis 500 with a number of laps led launched her into the racing stratosphere and helped produce the Indianapolis 500’s biggest rating in years.

Ultimately her best finish in the ‘500 in seven starts was third place in 2009, behind Helio Castroneves and the late Dan Wheldon.

She won at Motegi, 2008, for her first and only win in IndyCar.

INDIANAPOLIS, IN – MAY 29: Danica Patrick, driver of the #7 Team GoDaddy Dallara Honda, makes a pit stop during the IZOD IndyCar Series Indianapolis 500 Mile Race at Indianapolis Motor Speedway on May 29, 2011 in Indianapolis, Indiana. (Photo by Robert Laberge/Getty Images)

A visibly emotional Patrick announced this was the end of her full-time driving career to kick off the press conference, but switched to her future plans once she got through the opening remarks.

Patrick “never thought” she’d do the Indianapolis 500 again but when tossing around future ideas, the concept of running both Daytona and Indianapolis came up.

“I never thought I would do it. I always thought never, but I never said never. Here I am,” she said.

“Out of my mouth came, ‘What about Indy?’ That was really the first sort of idea that got me excited. Let’s do it. I called Haley (Moore, longtime PR rep). What did I just say I would do? She said, ‘Hell yes that’s a good idea.’

“I’m still surprised.”

Patrick will need to participate in the Indianapolis 500 refresher program for drivers that aren’t full-time drivers, so that will provide her a couple hours additional track time before practice opens to the full field in mid-May.

The new 2018 Dallara universal body kit comes into being this year too, and Patrick thinks she has improved as a driver over the last six seasons to be able to come back.

“(Going) 240… it’ll be no problem,” she deadpanned. “It’ll take a bit of adjusting. It’s different for sure. But I think I’m a better driver now. It’ll take a bit of acclimating. Yeah, I would like to get in a car before I get to Indy.”

Patrick said running the Daytona 500 and the Indianapolis 500 “could” occur with her same teams she last ran with full-time, Stewart-Haas Racing and Andretti Autosport, respectively. But her options remain open for both.