Keselowski not worried about criticism after Talladega crash

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Brad Keselowski’s hard-charging ways haven’t always been the most popular, and that certainly wasn’t the case last weekend at Talladega Superspeedway.

Keselowski was multiple laps down in the Aaron’s 499 but was still racing among the leaders in a bid to get those laps back. But with 50 laps to go, the 2012 Sprint Cup champion spun and triggered a 14-car pileup.

But the Team Penske driver said yesterday at Kansas Speedway that he wasn’t worried about the heat he’s taken from fellow drivers and fans on why he was racing so hard at the time.

“I got in a wreck at a plate track and I caused it – [it’s] like I am the first one to ever do that or something,” he said after qualifying third for tonight’s 5-Hour Energy 400.

“Wrecking is never fun but it happens and that is just part of racing. Anyone that doesn’t see it that way obviously has a set of biases that [ensures] they can’t make a rational judgment, so I don’t worry about their criticism.”

Defending Cup champion Jimmie Johnson said that he probably would’ve chosen to ride toward the back if he were multiple laps down like Keselowski was.

However, Keselowski himself disagreed with that sentiment.

“We all hold the steering wheel and there are 43 of us and we all hold it differently and make different decisions,” Keselowski said. “It would be quite lame to watch if we all did the same thing and had the same ideas and personas.

“I would say in most cases, I probably wouldn’t have done that. But in that case, I felt like it was the proper thing to do with having the potential to race the 1 car [Jamie McMurray] and get back in sequence.

“If we would have gotten back in sequence, we could have had a shot at winning the race with three or four yellows. I wasn’t ready to give up. I don’t feel like my team gave up on me and it is my job to not give up on them.”

Keselowski will try to put the ‘Dega incident behind him tonight on the 1.5-mile oval at Kansas. Team Penske has split the season’s first two races on 1.5-milers, with Keselowski winning at Las Vegas and teammate Joey Logano winning at Texas.

Logano starts second this evening next to pole sitter Kevin Harvick.

F1 2017 driver review: Carlos Sainz Jr.

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Carlos Sainz Jr.

Teams: Scuderia Toro Rosso (1-16), Renault (17-20)
Car No.: 33
Races: 20
Wins: 0
Podiums: 0
Best Finish: P4 (Singapore)
Pole Positions: 0
Fastest Laps: 0
Points: 54
Championship Position: 9th

Carlos Sainz Jr. has always been compared to Max Verstappen given their relative rise and stint together at Toro Rosso, but the Spaniard began to forge his own impressive path through 2017, securing himself a works drive with Renault in the process.

Alongside the struggling Daniil Kvyat for much of the season, Sainz led Toro Rosso’s charge, scoring 48 of its 53 points with a string of impressive drives. His headline moment came in Singapore when he matched Verstappen’s best result in Toro Rosso colors by finishing fourth, capitalizing on the start-line crash and the wet weather with a strong display.

Sainz’s displays led to a call from Renault, who announced just two days before his star display in Singapore he would be joining up for 2018 on loan from Red Bull. However, the deal was accelerated after a deal was brokered to secure Jolyon Palmer’s departure, allowing Sainz to join up from the United States GP onwards.

Sainz made an immediate impression, completing a perfect race en route to seventh on debut for Renault to secure six points that would prove crucial in the final constructors’ championship standings as the French team beat Toro Rosso to P6 in the standings at the last race of the year.

Red Bull retains an option on Sainz’s future beyond 2018, making him a candidate for a seat with its senior team should Daniel Ricciardo opt to leave. Failing that, Renault could offer Sainz the platform he needs to continue his rapid rise in F1 and establish himself at the front of the pack for many years to come.

Season High: Finishing fourth in Singapore after dodging the start-line drama.

Season Low: Crashing out in his final Toro Rosso appearance on the first lap at Suzuka.