What to watch for: IndyCar’s Grand Prix of Indianapolis

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THE START

Today’s inaugural running of the Grand Prix of Indianapolis (3:30 p.m. ET, check local listings) will begin with a standing start.

After the first such start of the year at Long Beach went off clean, you hope that today’s start will go the same way.

But it will be interesting to see if front-row starters Sebastian Saavedra (No. 17 KV/AFS Chevrolet) and rookie Jack Hawksworth (No. 98 Integrity Energee/Bryan Herta Autosport Honda) are able to hold their positions going into the hard right-hander at Turn 1 or if the pack of veterans behind them (led by Ryan Hunter-Reay and Simon Pagenaud in Row 2) will gobble them up in the rush.

TRACK OF OPPORTUNITY

The revamped 2.4-mile road course at Indianapolis Motor Speedway has garnered high marks, and it certainly feels like sincere praise instead of public relations.

There’s lots of grip everywhere and there’s three prominent passing zones: The aforementioned Turn 1 coming off the long front-stretch, the left-hand Turn 7 that comes off of the Hulman Boulevard straight, and Turn 12, which may see some incidents in addition to passing; as our man on the ground Tony DiZinno noted this morning, the entry to 12 can be tricky.

BRICKYARD BREAKTHROUGH?

Several drivers have shown lots of pace through the early stages of the Verizon IndyCar Series season, but haven’t been able to get the results they’ve deserved.

Most prominent in this group are Sebastien Bourdais (No. 11 Mistic/KVSH Racing Chevrolet) and Josef Newgarden (No. 67 Klipsch Audio/Sarah Fisher Hartman Racing Honda).

But with the IMS road course’s ample passing zones and long straights that works well for drafting, they’ve got an opportunity to finally break through; Bourdais starts seventh, while Newgarden is farther back in 16th.

NEW TRADITION

As the New York Times put it going into the weekend, there’s never been an IndyCar race quite like this one at the world’s greatest race course.

While some have not agreed with the series’ decision to have the Grand Prix kick off the Month of May activities, this honestly beats the heck out of a largely quiet Opening Day of practice.

Speedway president Doug Boles is hopeful for a crowd of 40,000 this afternoon, and while the gargantuan IMS will dwarf such a number, that would still be solid for this inaugural race.

Don’t look at the grandstands as much as the infield – if there’s a decent turnout in the latter, then IMS should feel good.

Have a decent tax refund coming? Buy Ayrton Senna’s 1993 Monaco-winning car

Photos courtesy Bonhams
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Are you expecting a better than normal tax refund? Did you get a very nice bonus from your company due to the new tax cut?

Well, if you have a good chunk of change hanging around and potentially can be in Monaco on May 11, you can have a chance to bid on the 1993 McLaren-Ford MP4/8A that the late Ayrton Senna drove in — and won — that year’s Monaco Grand Prix.

We’re not just talking about any race winner. It’s also the same car Senna won his sixth Monaco Grand Prix, and the chassis bears the number six.

It’s also the same car Senna piloted to that season’s F1 championship (his third and final title before sadly being killed the next year) and is the first McLaren driven by Senna that’s ever been sold or put up for auction.

The famed Bonhams auction house is overseeing the sale of the car.

“Any Grand Prix-winning car is important, but to have the golden combination of both Senna and Monaco is a seriously rare privilege indeed,” Bonhams global head of motorsport, Mark Osborne, told The Robb Report.

“Senna and Monaco are historically intertwined, and this car represents the culmination of his achievements at the Monegasque track. This is one of the most significant Grand Prix cars ever to appear at auction, and is certainly the most significant Grand Prix car to be offered since the Fangio Mercedes-Benz W196R, which sold for a world record at auction.”

How much might you need? You might want to get a couple of friends to throw in a few bucks as well.

“We expect the car to achieve a considerable seven-figure sum,” Osborne said.

The London newspaper “The Telegraph” predicts the car will sell in the $6.1 million range.”

“This car will set the world record for a Senna car at auction,” Osborne said. “We are as certain as you can be in the auction world.”

While you won’t be able to take the car for a test drive before the auction, it’ll be ready to roar once you pay the price.

“In theory, the buyer could be racing immediately upon receipt of the cleared funds after the auction,” Osborne said. “All systems are primed and ready.”