F1 promoters meet to discuss ways of improving the sport

1 Comment

The Formula 1 Promoters Association has met in Geneva, Switzerland, to discuss ways of improving Formula 1 and the experience for fans who attend the races, with the main topic up for debate being the new engine sound.

For 2014, the downsize in engines from V8s to turbocharged V6 power units has caused a definite decrease in the volume of the cars. The matter has largely divided opinion, with many supporting the hybrid route that has been taken. It also allows fans to hear the cars locking up under braking and contact being made.

However, Ron Walker, chairman of the Formula 1 Promoters Association and the Australian Grand Prix, made his distaste over the new sound clear at the opening race of the season in Melbourne. He even suggested that the problem was so grave that some promoters may think twice about extending their deals to host Formula 1 grands prix.

Mercedes will test a ‘trumpet’ exhaust system at next weekend’s test in Spain in a bid to improve the sound, but the promoters met with Bernie Ecclestone yesterday to discuss other possible moves.

A statement issued in the paddock today reads:

“A meeting was held on Saturday May 10 2014, between the promoters of the FIA Formula One World Championship, chaired by Ron Walker to discuss various aspects of Formula 1 for the benefit of all fans who are concerned about maintaining the unique feeling of Formula 1. Mr. Ecclestone attended the meeting in support of the promoters. 17 countries were represented.”

It will be interesting to see if anything comes of this meeting, but it is unlikely that the matter that really has riled fans – double points for the final race in Abu Dhabi – will have been addressed.

Hamilton: Abu Dhabi ‘the last race with good-looking cars’ in F1

Getty Images
1 Comment

Lewis Hamilton believes that this weekend’s Abu Dhabi Grand Prix will be remembered as the last race with good-looking Formula 1 cars ahead of the introduction of the ‘Halo’ cockpit protection for next year.

Officials from the FIA and F1 Strategy Group confirmed earlier this year that the Halo would be fitted to all cars from the 2018 season in a bid to improve safety standards, with the deaths of Justin Wilson and Jules Bianchi putting head protection high on the agenda for the series’ chiefs.

Hamilton has long made his opposition to the Halo clear, believing it will ruin the look of F1 cars, and echoed his thoughts ahead of the final Halo-less race in Abu Dhabi this weekend.

“It’s the last year of looking good I think in the cars. It’s the last race where the cars will look good,” Hamilton said.

“I think next year, it’s all downhill from there in terms of how they look.

“But safety will go up at least, and maybe it could be successful in some way.”

Hamilton’s F1 title rival Sebastian Vettel was less bothered about the change, believing the field will adjust and move on.

“The cars will look different next year. Everything I’ve seen so far looks different, but on the other hand it is something we all get used to,” Vettel said.

“But no doubt the cars look better now, but we’ll get used to it, and we’ll work on the aesthetics so it can be better. It is less of a big deal.”

Red Bull’s Daniel Ricciardo shared Vettel’s view, saying: “I don’t think it’s gonna be as dramatic as most people make it out to be.”