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Analysis: Reduction in teams means increase in partnerships to make 33 for Indy 500

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Racing partnerships make the world go ‘round.

A team doesn’t race without a tire and engine partner, and it doesn’t get to that stage without a primary and a wealth of associate sponsors helping to bankroll the projects.

Yet while partnerships for a team are nothing new, team-to-team partnerships appear to be on the rise this year to help the Verizon IndyCar Series make 33 cars at the Indianapolis 500.

Over the last three years, as the series has shifted from the previous Dallara chassis to the new Dallara DW12, the net car count in terms of total entries and total teams has gone down, which has meant more partnerships from existing teams have arisen to hit the number.

The 2011 Indianapolis 500, for instance, included these teams that have since gone away from full-time competition:

  • Panther Racing (JR Hildebrand, Buddy Rice)
  • Newman/Haas Racing (Oriol Servia, James Hinchcliffe)
  • Dreyer & Reinbold Racing (Davey Hamilton, Justin Wilson, Paul Tracy, Ana Beatriz)
  • Conquest Racing (Pippa Mann, Sebastian Saavedra)
  • HVM Racing (Simona de Silvestro)
  • AFS Racing (Raphael Matos)
  • Dragon Racing (Scott Speed, Ho-Pin Tung, Patrick Carpentier)

Just there, that’s seven teams, and a total of 14 cars that have gone away from the Indianapolis 500 field. Those 14 coupled with the 25 or 26 full-time cars made for a ‘500 field of more than 40 attempting to qualify for the 33-car field.

The evolution after 2011 saw Newman/Haas shutter its operation altogether, Conquest fail to strike an engine lease deal when the new chassis and engine came together, and Dragon, HVM and DRR all get stuck with Lotus for the start of 2012.

Conquest and AFS partnered with Andretti Autosport for partial efforts for both Beatriz and Saavedra, respectively, in 2012. AFS is now with KV Racing for Saavedra’s car this year. But neither Eric Bachelart (Conquest) nor Gary Peterson (AFS) has existed as their own entity since.

HVM was the lone Lotus holdover after the month of May as DRR, Dragon and Bryan Herta Autosport were all able to get out of their contracts. But come the end of the year, HVM as its own entity ended and the Leaders’ Circle points, and Keith Wiggins’ minority ownership stake ventured to, you guessed it, Andretti Autosport for the team’s fourth full-time car for 2013 (EJ Viso then, Carlos Munoz now).

DRR temporarily closed after last year’s Indy 500 – the second team on this list Servia has been a part of where he ran its most recent list – but is now back this year, albeit in partnership mode. We’ll get to that in a minute.

Dragon and Panther withdrew in the offseason, with Dragon’s Leaders’ Circle entry going to Roger Penske’s third car (the Juan Pablo Montoya No. 2 Chevrolet is officially referred to as Penske Motorsports, not Team Penske, by INDYCAR); meanwhile Panther’s equipment is at KV, which also has the AFS partnership, this month of May.

What we have in this year’s 33 are these notable partnerships:

  • No. 2 Penske Motorsports (Team Penske’s car for Juan Pablo Montoya, but with the ex-Dragon Racing chassis, Leaders’ Circle position)
  • No. 11 KVSH Racing (KV mainly, with SH full season partnership, after part-time collaboration between the two in previous years)
  • No. 17 KV/AFS Racing (KV, and Gary Peterson’s AFS Racing group)
  • No. 22 DRR Kingdom Racing (Dreyer & Reinbold, with Davey Hamilton’s Kingdom Racing group, in a technical partnership with Chip Ganassi Racing to provide Sage Karam his debut)
  • No. 33 KV Racing Technology (partnership with Always Evolving Racing, and one that may feature support from TRG-AMR North America)
  • No. 34 Andretti-HVM (partnership with HVM’s Keith Wiggins)
  • No. 68 Sarah Fisher Hartman Racing (Wink Hartman is team co-owner, and this particular chassis is the Steve Weirich-owned Rotondo Weirich entry for Alex Tagliani)
  • No. 77 Schmidt Peterson Hamilton Motorsports (Hamilton is a minority partner in the group led by Sam Schmidt and Ric Peterson, which also fields the No. 5 and No. 7 cars)
  • No. 98 BHA/BBM with Curb-Agajanian (name speaks for itself re: the number of partners)

And we haven’t even gotten to sponsors yet.

But here’s two drivers as examples: rookie Karam’s No. 22 car is likely to be the Comfort Revolution/Big Machine Records/Brantley Gilbert DRR Kingdom Racing with Chip Ganassi Racing Chevrolet. Bell’s KVRT entry could be the No. 6 Robert Graham/Royal Purple/Beneteau USA Chevrolet.

With nary a bump attempt in the last two years, and one unlikely at the moment in 2014, we’re left with a worrying prospect longer term about the number of teams within the series: a distinct lack of new blood.

Two years ago, the saga of Michael Shank, of GRAND-AM, trying to pursue a Honda or Chevrolet engine lease was well documented, including by this writer. Shank, who was on a high from winning that year’s Rolex 24 at Daytona, did not want a Lotus citing its lack of competitiveness.

It was a new owner to the series, who was not an ex-driver (the series’ newest team owners are Ed Carpenter in 2012, Bryan Herta in 2010 and Sarah Fisher in 2008, along with Buddy Lazier’s family for Indy-only entries beginning last year), who had a chassis and an interest.

But the way the engine rules were written, manufacturers needed to supply up to 40 percent of the field, and Lotus was unable to hit that target. Chevrolet and Honda both went above and beyond to extend their month of May capacity, though it was still to the dismay of Shank and some drivers who sought opportunities to qualify.

Fast-forward two years. Shank’s team never started an IndyCar race, the aforementioned partnerships have come together out of the former small teams and the bigger teams, if anything, have grown.

The Penske (3 cars), Andretti (5 cars) and Ganassi (4 cars, plus the fifth DRR-affiliated entry) will make up 13 of the 33 entries, more than a third of the field. Add in KVRT’s 4 and suddenly that’s more than half spread between four teams – or 17 of the 33.

The reduction in full-season car count, as well, from 26 to 25 to 22 at the last three season-openers, has also meant that the 10 or so Indy-only entries isn’t enough to cover the bases for 33, or provide enough extras for bumping.

Bottom line is we’re at an interesting stage in IndyCar as it relates to the presence of teams, entries and, on another note, crews.

The crews that were available for full-time efforts, plus the Indy one-offs, have also gone down.

Part of the reason for the grind for 33 this year is to find enough crews for the entries. It’s being done, but there are plenty of individuals from the world of sports car racing being brought in to assist.

We’ll see how the series goes forward from here, but we have enough of a trend to see that something will probably need to change to help keep the car count at or above 33 for the month of May. As ever, cost of entry and cost of operation for the ROI and deliverables to partners remain a constant target for teams.

Here are driver running orders for 2017 Barcelona tests

MONTMELO, SPAIN - FEBRUARY 26:  Carlos Sainz of Spain with Daniil Kvyat of Russia both of Scuderia Toro Rosso unveil the new STR-12 F1 car during previews to F1 winter testing at Circuit de Catalunya on February 26, 2017 in Montmelo, Spain.  (Photo by Peter Fox/Getty Images)
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Tomorrow, the 2017 Formula 1 season will be underway at Circuit de Catalunya-Barcelona with the first of two four-day tests at the track.

The tests run from February 27-March 2, and March 7-10. The season opens in Melbourne with the Australian Grand Prix on March 26, on NBCSN.

Most teams have released the running orders for their drivers, although there’s still some blanks to be filled in. A link to all teams’ new cars is here.

Here’s who you can expect to see, when, for these two tests. This post will be updated with more info when it arrives:

Haas F1 Team Test Schedule (Haas breakout

Test 1
February 27 – Kevin Magnussen
February 28 – Kevin Magnussen
March 1 – Romain Grosjean
March 2 – Romain Grosjean

Test 2
March 7 – Kevin Magnussen
March 8 – Romain Grosjean
March 9 – Kevin Magnussen
March 10 – Romain Grosjean

Sahara Force India Test Schedule (Force India breakout

Test 1
February 27 – Sergio Perez
February 28 – Esteban Ocon
March 1 – Alfonso Celis Jr.
March 2 – Sergio Perez/Esteban Ocon

Test 2
March 7 – Esteban Ocon
March 8 – Sergio Perez
March 9 – Esteban Ocon
March 10 – Sergio Perez

Williams Martini Racing Test Schedule (Williams breakout)

Test 1
February 27 – Felipe Massa
February 28 – Lance Stroll
March 1 – Felipe Massa
March 2 – Lance Stroll

Test 2
March 7 – Lance Stroll
March 8 – Lance Stroll
March 9 – Felipe Massa
March 10 – Felipe Massa

Mercedes AMG Petronas Test Schedule (Mercedes breakout)

Monday 27 February
Morning – Valtteri Bottas
Afternoon – Lewis Hamilton

Tuesday 28 February
Morning – Lewis Hamilton
Afternoon – Valtteri Bottas

Wednesday 1 March
Morning – Valtteri Bottas
Afternoon – Lewis Hamilton

Thursday 2 March
Morning – Lewis Hamilton
Afternoon – Valtteri Bottas

McLaren Honda Test Schedule (McLaren breakout)

Test 1
February 27 – Fernando Alonso
February 28 – Stoffel Vandoorne
March 1 – Fernando Alonso
March 2 – Stoffel Vandoorne

Red Bull Racing Test Schedule

Test 1
February 27 – Daniel Ricciardo
February 28 – Max Verstappen
March 1 – Daniel Ricciardo
March 2 – Max Verstappen

Scuderia Toro Rosso Test Schedule

Test 1
February 27 – Carlos Sainz Jr.
February 28 – Daniil Kvyat
March 1 – TBC
March 2 – TBC

Scuderia Ferrari Test Schedule

Test 1
February 27 – Sebastian Vettel
February 28 – Kimi Raikkonen
March 1 – Sebastian Vettel
March 2 – Kimi Raikkonen

Renault Sport F1 Test Schedule

Test 1
February 27 – Nico Hulkenberg
February 28 – Jolyon Palmer
March 1 – TBC
March 2 – TBC

Sauber F1 Team Test Schedule

Test 1
February 27 – Marcus Ericsson
February 28 – Antonio Giovinazzi

Wednesday 1 March
Morning – Marcus Ericsson
Afternoon – Antonio Giovinazzi

Thursday 2 March
Morning – Marcus Ericsson
Afternoon – Antonio Giovinazzi

Leah Pritchett races to second straight NHRA Top Fuel win

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Photo: Don Schumacher Racing
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CHANDLER, Ariz. (AP) Leah Pritchett raced to her second straight Top Fuel victory to start the season Sunday and successfully defended her NHRA Arizona Nationals title.

Pritchett beat Brittany Force in the final for the second year in a row at Wild Horse Pass Motorsports, finishing in 3.705 seconds at 328.22 mph. Pritchett has three career victories, also winning the season-opener two weeks ago in Pomona, California.

“I’m learning to do what it takes to get into that extreme, severe mindset of what it takes to do what we’re doing,” Pritchett said. “Honestly, I’m trying to keep up with my team for how well they’re doing and make them proud of me as a driver and do the job that is expected of a Don Schumacher racing team and I think we’re doing pretty OK with that. We’re blessed with the equipment and the talent capabilities of the people and everyone that it takes to make it. I’m happy I can hold up my end of the bargain.”

Force ran a 3.704 at 330.39, losing on a holeshot.

Pritchett is the first Top Fuel driver to sweep the first races since Gary Scelzi in 1997.

Matt Hagan won in Funny Car for the second straight event, and Greg Anderson topped the Pro Stock field.

Hagan had a 3.878 at 330.88 in a Dodge Charger R/T to beat defending season champion Ron Capps. Anderson raced to his 87th career victory, beating Drew Skillman with a 6.547 at 211.43 in a Chevrolet Camaro.

James Key notes similarities between Toro Rosso, Mercedes 2017 F1 cars

MONTMELO, SPAIN - FEBRUARY 26: Scuderia Toro Rosso Team Principal Franz Tost, Daniil Kvyat of Russia and Scuderia Toro Rosso, Carlos Sainz of Spain and Scuderia Toro Rosso and James Key, Technical Director of Scuderia Toro Rosso unveil the Scuderia Toro Rosso STR12 in the pitlane during previews to F1 winter testing at Circuit de Catalunya on February 26, 2017 in Montmelo, Spain.  (Photo by Mark Thompson/Getty Images)
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Scuderia Toro Rosso technical chief James Key has noted the similarities in the design between his team’s new Formula 1 car and Mercedes’ W08 EQ Power+.

Toro Rosso unveiled its new STR12 car on Sunday in Barcelona prior to the start of pre-season testing on Monday, with the team’s striking new livery being the biggest talking point.

After returning to current-year power units courtesy of Renault, hopes are high at Faenza that Toro Rosso could be the surprise package of F1 in 2017, particularly given the change in the regulations.

Speaking to reporters following the STR12’s launch, Key was quick to note that Toro Rosso appeared to have coincidentally gone down a similar path to Mercedes when it came to interpreting the new regulations.

“I looked at the Mercedes and thought: ‘Ah, OK. They’ve got our front suspension’. Most people will say we’ve got Mercedes’ front suspension,” Key said, as quoted by Reuters.

“The nose is similar, the front of the side pods is similar, even the bodywork of the sidepods is similar. Let’s just hope the engines are similar!”

Despite being on the same wavelength as the three-time reigning constructors’ championship-winning team, Key admitted he felt a twinge of disappointment.

“On the one hand we were pleased to see someone else has done a similar thing; on the other hand we were disappointed that we weren’t the only team to think of something,” Key said.

“There are many different concepts out there, actually.”

Toro Rosso finished seventh in last year’s constructors’ championship, having spent the latter part of the season largely hamstrung by the 2015-spec Ferrari engine it was using.

Carlos Sainz Jr. and Daniil Kvyat return for another year with Toro Rosso in 2017, with the first public running of the STR12 coming in the next few days at the Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya.

Formula 1 gets colorful: Here are all 10 liveries for 2017

© Getty Images
© Getty Images
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Following Scuderia Toro Rosso’s launch of the new STR12 car on Sunday night, the Formula 1 grid is now set ahead of the start of pre-season testing in Barcelona on Monday.

All 10 teams have sported cars that are quite the deviation from their predecessors, as forced by the overhaul of the technical regulations for the new season.

While the changes are mainly in place to make the cars quicker on-track, they also look more visually appealing than the 2016 grid – even if the debate over the ‘shark fin’ is set to rage on.

F1 has also got more colorful, with a number of teams sporting big livery changes that will make cars easier to pick out when you tune in across NBC Sports this season.

Here is what the grid will look like for F1 in 2017.

Mercedes W08 EQ Power+

2017 Silver Arrows Collateral Day Photography - Steve Etherington
© Mercedes AMG Petronas

Red Bull RB13

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© Red Bull Racing

Ferrari SF70H

© Scuderia Ferrari
© Scuderia Ferrari

Force India VJM10

© Sahara Force India
© Sahara Force India

Williams FW40

© Wil
© Williams Martini Racing

McLaren-Honda MCL32

 (Photo by McLaren F1 via Getty Images)
© McLaren F1 via Getty Images

Toro Rosso STR12

© Scuderia T
© Scuderia Toro Rosso

Haas VF-17

© Haas F1 Team
© Haas F1 Team

Renault R.S.17

© Getty Images
© Getty Images

Sauber C36

© Sauber
© Sauber