Chip Ganassi, Bobby Rahal lead new class of Auto Racing Hall of Fame inductees

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Chip Ganassi (pictured), Bobby Rahal, Bill Simpson, Jimmy McElreath, and Leo Mehl are set to be inducted next week into the Auto Racing Hall of Fame, which primarily honors the most important figures in the history of the Indianapolis 500.

The induction ceremony will take place during the annual Indy 500 Oldtimers’ dinner on Thursday in downtown Indianapolis. The ARHF currently has 148 members and had its inaugural class of inductees in 1952.

Ganassi and Rahal are probably the best-known figures in this year’s class. While Ganassi has won the Indy 500 five times as an owner, he also was a five-time starter as a driver, collecting a top finish of eighth in 1983. And as you probably know, Rahal won the 1986 Indy as a driver and the 2004 Indy as an owner with American racer Buddy Rice.

Longtime racing fans will also know of Simpson’s contributions to the sport through safety innovations. Recently, the former Indy 500 driver has started to put his expertise to work in football, creating lighter helmets for the sport’s players in a partnership with Ganassi.

McElreath competed 15 times in the Indy 500 from 1962 to 1980, with a best finish of third in ’66. His sixth-place run in the 1962 Indy was enough to net him the race’s Rookie of the Year Award, and he also netted some notable wins in his career at other historical tracks such as Ontario (he won the inaugural California 500 there in 1970 for A.J. Foyt), Langhorne, Trenton, and Phoenix.

Mehl logged almost four decades of service to Goodyear, and the last 17 years he spent there came as its worldwide director of racing – overseeing efforts in series as diverse as Formula One, NASCAR, CART, USAC and more. From 1997-1999, Mehl was also executive director of the Indy Racing League, which is now known as the Verizon IndyCar Series.

Montoya: ‘Hopefully I get a chance to do Indy again’ (VIDEO)

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Juan Pablo Montoya is on site at this weekend’s United States Grand Prix, his latest trip in a summer and fall filled with a lot of international travel and a number of different race cars he’s been in.

Montoya is committed to a full season in the IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship with Acura Team Penske in 2018, as he’ll share one of the team’s Acura ARX-05s with Dane Cameron.

However, the question of whether he’ll be able to race in the 102nd Indianapolis 500 presented by PennGrade Motor Oil remains.

Team Penske has said it plans to only run four cars next month of May, with Helio Castroneves as the fourth driver alongside the three full-time cars driven by Josef Newgarden, Simon Pagenaud and Will Power.

While Montoya has said elsewhere that he’s shopping offers and has talked with other teams, it’d be highly surprising to see the two-time Indianapolis 500 champion who developed the Chevrolet engine for IndyCar’s 2018 Dallara universal body kit in a Honda-powered IndyCar, although he is running Honda’s brand (Acura) in sports cars.

Montoya elaborated on his Indy 500 prospects in an interview with NBCSN pit reporter and insider Will Buxton at the Circuit of The Americas.

“Not full-time no,” Montoya told NBCSN of his IndyCar 2018 prospects. “Hopefully I get a chance to go to Indy, hopefully with Penske, (and) if not someone else. We’ll see.”

Photo: IndyCar

Montoya has extolled the early testing both on the 2018 IndyCar and on the Acura ARX-05.

The first Acura chassis has run at Road Atlanta and Sebring International Raceway thus far, and will be put through its paces at other venues over the next few months.

“It’s been good. We did a lot of work with INDYCAR on that car. Fans are gonna like it,” Montoya said of the 2018 kit.

“Going to IMSA with the Acura program, we’ve done a lot of testing. It’s a beauty to drive. It drives better than what it looks! I haven’t had that much fun driving a race car in a long time.”

Acura ARX-05 Daytona Prototype international (DPi) race car to be campaigned by Team Penske in 2018