Indy 500 Qualifying Format, Qualifying Draw for Day 1

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Chances are you may have forgotten or not fully remembered the new qualifying format for the Indianapolis 500 that’s coming into play this year.

In a few sentences, here’s my best shot at explaining it: You qualify today for race pit positioning, points (33 for first down to 1 for 33rd), and a shot at Sunday’s Fast Nine shootout. Tomorrow’s qualifying then actually sets the starting order for the race, with two segments to cover 10-33, and again from 1-9.

In other words, every driver and car is gonna have to strap in and go fast for four laps, at least twice.

Luckily, INDYCAR has put together a “Qualifying 101” for today – here is how it reads:


• All entries are guaranteed one attempt to qualify between 11 a.m. and 5:50 p.m.
• The fastest 33 cars will make up the provisional field for the 98th Running of the Indianapolis 500 Mile Race based on the fastest four-lap average time.
• Once the qualifying session ends, the top 30 cars are locked in to the field.
• However, all 33 cars must re-qualify on Sunday to determine final starting positions.
• The fastest nine cars advance to a shootout on Sunday to determine the Verizon P1 Award.

Qualifying Lines: 

• There will be two qualifying lines at the end of pit lane:
o Line 1: Cars that are unqualified or have withdrawn their previous qualifying times. Priority will be given to this lane.
o Line 2: Cars that have already qualified but want another attempt and have not withdrawn their previous qualifying times.
•  Multiple attempts are permitted without withdrawing a time by entering Line 2.
•  Teams can withdraw their time and enter Line 1, which will have priority over cars already in the field.
•  Teams that make multiple attempts can only improve their times if they have not withdrawn their time to enter Line 2, meaning, even if a driver records a slower four-lap average, that driver’s previous (faster) time will stand.

Qualifying Points, Saturday

1st – 33 points
2nd – 32 points
3rd – 31 points
4th – 30 points
5th – 29 points
6th – 28 points
7th – 27 points
8th – 26 points
9th – 25 points
10th – 24 points
11th – 23 points
12th – 22 points
13th – 21 points
14th – 20 points
15th – 19 points
16th – 18 points
17th – 17 points
18th – 16 points
19th – 15 points
20th – 14 points
21st  – 13 points
22nd – 12 points
23rd – 11 points
24th – 10 points
25th – 9 points
26th – 8 points
27th – 7 points
28th – 6 points
29th – 5 points
30th – 4 points
31st – 3 points
32nd – 2 points
33rd – 1 point


Group 1:

• All Saturday times are erased and positions 10-30 will re-qualify to determine starting position.
• Order will be the reverse of Saturday’s rankings.
• Lineup will be determined based on fastest four-lap averages.
• In the event that there are only 33 cars entered, this group will determine positions 10-33.

Group 2 (Only used in the event there are more than 33 cars):

• All Saturday times are erased and positions 31-33, and any entry that has yet to make one attempt to qualify, will re-qualify to determine the 11th row of the race.

Group 3:

• The top nine cars will run in reverse order based on Saturday’s times.
• All cars will make one attempt.
• At the end of the session, the cars are ranked 1-9 based on their four-lap average during the segment.

Qualifying Points, Sunday:

1st – 9 points
2nd – 8 points
3rd – 7 points
4th – 6 points
5th – 5 points
6th – 4 points
7th – 3 points
8th – 2 points
9th – 1 point

Note: The Indianapolis 500 will award double points for race results, but the qualifying points and any bonus points awarded for leading a lap (1 point) or most laps (2 points) will not be doubled.

And now, with that in mind, here’s the qualifying draw for today’s run. Teams have until 7 p.m. tonight to declare to INDYCAR if anyone wants to add an extra, what would be 34th car. Qualifying runs from 11-5:50 today (check local listings).

Num Car Driver Best Speed
1 8T Ryan Briscoe 219.745
2 91 Buddy Lazier 218.277
3 34 Carlos Munoz 227.938
4 21 JR Hildebrand 229.384
5 2 Juan Pablo Montoya 229.205
6 9 Scott Dixon 229.062
7 67T Josef Newgarden No Speed
8 20 Ed Carpenter 230.522
9 9T Scott Dixon 220.226
10 98 Jack Hawksworth 228.176
11 18 Carlos Huertas 224.242
12 8 Ryan Briscoe 226.072
12A 3 Helio Castroneves 229.843
14 27T James Hinchcliffe No Speed
15 19 Justin Wilson 225.058
16 63 Pippa Mann 223.984
17 68T Alex Tagliani No Speed
18 41 Martin Plowman 228.036
19 25 Marco Andretti 229.419
20 77T Simon Pagenaud No Speed
21 5T Jacques Villeneuve No Speed
22 26 Kurt Busch 224.739
23 11T Sebastien Bourdais No Speed
24 7 Mikhail Aleshin 227.822
25 83T Charlie Kimball 221.845
26 15 Graham Rahal 223.478
27 27 James Hinchcliffe 228.115
28 14T Takuma Sato No Speed
29 5 Jacques Villeneuve 227.682
30 22T Sage Karam No Speed
31 18T Carlos Huertas No Speed
32 12 Will Power 225.899
33 34T Carlos Munoz No Speed
34 28T Ryan Hunter-Reay No Speed
35 17 Sebastian Saavedra 226.137
36 33 James Davison 217.052
37 77 Simon Pagenaud 228.544
38 16T Oriol Servia No Speed
39 12T Will Power No Speed
40 83 Charlie Kimball 224.544
41 10 Tony Kanaan 224.836
42 98T Jack Hawksworth No Speed
43 67 Josef Newgarden 229.276
44 6 Townsend Bell 225.484
45 15T Graham Rahal No Speed
46 3T Helio Castroneves No Speed
47 2T Juan Pablo Montoya No Speed
48 63T Pippa Mann No Speed
49 68 Alex Tagliani 227.394
50 10T Tony Kanaan 220.755
51 22 Sage Karam 223.903
52 14 Takuma Sato 227.741
53 28 Ryan Hunter-Reay 228.603
54 7T Mikhail Aleshin No Speed
55 16 Oriol Servia 226.387
56 19T Justin Wilson No Speed
57 25T Marco Andretti No Speed
58 11 Sebastien Bourdais 226.351
59 20T Ed Carpenter No Speed
60 41T Martin Plowman No Speed

IndyCar 2015 Driver Review: Gabby Chaves

Gabby Chaves
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MotorSportsTalk continues its run through the driver-by-driver field in the Verizon IndyCar Series. In 15th and the rookie-of-the-year for 2015, was Gabby Chaves.

Gabby Chaves, No. 98 Bryan Herta Autosport Honda

  • 2014: Indy Lights champion
  • 2015: 15th Place, Best Finish 9th, Best Start 12th, 0 Top-5, 2 Top-10, 31 Laps Led, 19.3 Avg. Start, 14.4 Avg. Finish

Some drivers finish better than their performances show. Some drivers have performances better than their results show. The latter statement applied to Gabby Chaves in his rookie year, in what was an impressive first season after making the step up from Indy Lights, which deservedly earned him rookie-of-the-year honors.

The best comparison I’d make for Gabby is of Josef Newgarden in 2012 with Sarah Fisher Hartman Racing, a first-year driver on a single-car, newish team to the series.

Chaves rarely dazzled in qualifying but that wasn’t his fault; he and engineer John Dick worked well together and Chaves recounted multiple times this year that a tweak here or tweak there, the wrong way, on the aero kit would send them down the wrong setup path.

Results in races didn’t measure up either but again that was through almost no fault of his own. The only time Chaves looked truly like a rookie was at St. Pete, when he had several collisions. Otherwise he was ahead of eventual winner James Hinchcliffe at NOLA before getting punted off, reliable through the month of May in Indianapolis, finally able to break through for a ninth place in Detroit race two, overachieving in Texas, 11th at Milwaukee after some great wheel-to-wheel racing with series winners and champions, and then phenomenal at Pocono as he was on course for a first career win or podium before late-race engine issues – his first DNF of the season.

For both Chaves and Herta, you’d love to see them together for another season, and the results and confidence for both parties will grow as a result. Those who’ve seen Newgarden’s rise over four years with Fisher and now CFH will note the long-term stability, and that’s what Chaves could do if he gets the time.

He planted the seed of being a great IndyCar driver, and he became pretty versatile during the year too with additional appearances in the DeltaWing prototype, a short-track midget and one of Herta’s Red Bull Global Rallycross cars. To boot, he’s a smart, great kid who is mature beyond his years, and someone you should be buying stock in now. Anyone who saw Chaves in the Mazda Road to Indy should not have been surprised by his rookie season in the big cars.

Off The Grid: Monza preview (premieres Saturday 10/10 on NBCSN)

F1 Grand Prix of Italy
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Having already taken you behind the scenes in Barcelona, Budapest, Singapore, Melbourne and Silverstone, Will Buxton and Jason Swales now head to one of Formula 1’s most iconic venues for the latest episode of Off The Grid.

Monza has appeared in all but one F1 season since the formation of the world championship in 1950, and is a firm favorite among drivers, teams and fans alike.

However, there is far more to the Italian Grand Prix than meets the eye, as we find out in Saturday’s premiere of Off The Grid: Monza at 9:30am ET (follows Russian GP qualifying).

Having honed his talents in go-karts as a kid, Red Bull driver Daniel Ricciardo is now trying to pass on his knowledge to the next generation of racers. But can he teach Will or Jason a thing or two?

We also catch up with Force India’s Nico Hulkenberg and get a feel for life on the road as he takes us for a tour of his lavish bus in which he travels in for the European F1 races.

Have you ever wondered just how the suits F1 drivers wear are made? We go behind the scenes at Alpine Stars’ factory in Italy and find out.

Off The Grid: Monza premieres on Saturday at 9:30am ET on NBCSN following Russian GP qualifying.