F1 Grand Prix of Monaco - Qualifying

Rosberg narrowly beats Hamilton to Monaco GP pole

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Nico Rosberg has secured pole position for the Monaco Grand Prix after edging out Mercedes teammate Lewis Hamilton by just 0.059 seconds in the final stage of qualifying today.

The German driver secured provisional pole on the first set of runs, but made a mistake on his final hot lap that saw him go off at Mirabeau. This brought out yellow flags, meaning that no-one could improve their time, and meant that Hamilton was forced to settle for second place.

Red Bull once again was best of the rest in third and fourth, with Daniel Ricciardo ahead of Sebastian Vettel, whilst Ferrari locked out the third row as Fernando Alonso finished fifth ahead of Kimi Raikkonen.

Qualifying began under bright blue skies and in warm conditions, and most of the drivers headed out early in order to post a banker lap time. There was a split in choice between the soft and super-soft tires, with some believing that it was not worth running on the slower compound to begin with. Predictably, Mercedes had faith in its pace and immediately went fastest on the soft tires with Rosberg ahead of Hamilton. Daniil Kvyat had a huge spin on the exit of the tunnel, and was lucky not to suffer more damage than a ruined front wing.

As is the norm in Monaco, traffic made setting a clean lap time hard for the drivers out there, with Nico Hulkenberg complaining over his radio that he had been blocked. Pastor Maldonado managed to put his super-soft tires to go use to sit third at the halfway point in the session, but Red Bull opted to bide its time, waiting before sending Daniel Ricciardo and Sebastian Vettel out. With their first efforts, Ricciardo went third fastest and Vettel slotted into fifth place.

With five minutes to go, most opted to pit for a fresh set of tires in a last effort to make it out of the drop zone. All teams except Mercedes and Red Bull had to make the switch to the super-soft tire in order to be sure of a place in Q2, and this worked for Jean-Eric Vergne as he finished the session in first place. The pressure was on Sauber once again as Esteban Gutierrez and Adrian Sutil were in the drop zone after Kvyat had returned to the track after his crash, and was in 16th place.

However, when Marcus Ericsson and Felipe Massa made contact at Mirabeau and brought out the yellow flags, it ruined all hot laps and meant that both Saubers were eliminated in Q1 alongside the Marussia and Caterham drivers. As a result of the incident, Massa was not able to go out in Q2, and as a result will start in 16th at best tomorrow. The stewards will investigate the collision after qualifying, as well as reports of blocking by Sergio Perez, Esteban Gutierrez, Pastor Maldonado and Daniil Kvyat.

On the super-soft tire, Mercedes once again ruled the roost, but Hamilton was still fractionally slower than Rosberg. Daniel Ricciardo continued to prove that Red Bull was best of the rest in third place, ahead of Fernando Alonso and Kimi Raikkonen. Sebastian Vettel was late out on track once again, but he moved up into P4 behind his teammate despite report that his ERS system wasn’t working properly.

In the final set of runs, Lewis Hamilton produced a fine lap to move up to P1 ahead of his teammate. Fernando Alonso improved his lap time to get up into third place, whilst Jean-Eric Vergne also managed to make it into the top ten alongside his teammate. This in turn bumped Nico Hulkenberg down outside of the top ten, ending his qualifying in Q2, whilst Lotus also failed to continue its string of top ten qualifyings as Grosjean and Maldonado qualified 14th and 15th respectively. Jenson Button and Valtteri Bottas also failed to make it into the top ten, and will start 12th and 13th tomorrow.

All ten drivers were quick to head out on track in order to have two runs in the fight for pole position. Sergio Perez was the first to lay down a benchmark, but he was soon bumped down the order as Rosberg and Hamilton warmed up their tires for their first hot lap. Fernando Alonso and Kimi Raikkonen briefly sat first and second, but the Mercedes and Red Bull drivers soon came out.

First blood went to Rosberg in the fight for pole, as he posted a time just 0.059 seconds quicker than Hamilton’s. Daniel Ricciardo was four-tenths further back, but remained ahead of teammate Sebastian Vettel in fourth place after their first runs.

On the final set of runs, Rosberg was pushing hard and locked up into Mirabeau, forcing him to take evasive action down the slip road. However, this did bring out yellow flags, and meant that none of the drivers could improve as they had to back off. This inadvertently secured pole position for the German driver ahead of his teammate and the Red Bulls of Daniel Ricciardo and Sebastian Vettel.

For the second year in a row, Rosberg will start on pole position at Monaco, but Hamilton seemed to be less than impressed to have finished second once the session was over. It could set the scene for an enthralling fight between the two Mercedes drivers tomorrow in Monaco.

You can watch the Monaco Grand Prix live from 7:30am ET on NBC, with the pre-race show starting at 7am ET on NBCSN.

Gutierrez delighted with P12 in Monaco qualifying, beating Grosjean

MONTE-CARLO, MONACO - MAY 28: Esteban Gutierrez of Mexico driving the (21) Haas F1 Team Haas-Ferrari VF-16 Ferrari 059/5 turbo on track during qualifying for the Monaco Formula One Grand Prix at Circuit de Monaco on May 28, 2016 in Monte-Carlo, Monaco.  (Photo by Mark Thompson/Getty Images)
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Esteban Gutierrez thanked the Haas Formula 1 Team for its work after scoring his best qualifying result of the season so far in Monaco on Saturday.

Gutierrez finished 12th in Q2, beating teammate Romain Grosjean for the first time in qualifying this year and finishing less than two-tenths of a second off a Q3 berth.

Haas arrived in Monaco hopeful of resolving the issues that blighted its Spanish Grand Prix, and Gutierrez’s result suggested that progress had been made.

“I’m very happy with today. It’s been a positive day,” Gutierrez said.

“At the start it was difficult to get the tires right, and run by run I was trying to modify and adapt to the circumstances. Finally, we got everything together.

“With a 12th position start in Monte Carlo, a lot can happen in the front. I’m very proud of the team and the work we’ve been doing. Communication has been improving.

“We’ve been understanding the car step by step, and this will give us a lot of confidence going forward.

“Overall, it’s been a very good day for us.”

Grosjean may have only qualified 15th, but he too felt that the team had made significant progress since the race in Spain.

“We had the speed to go into Q3. We showed that in Q1,” Grosjean said.

“Just two times there was traffic on my out laps in Q2. We went out behind the Mercedes and they were going slow and that’s what got me.

“If the tires had been ready for the first timed lap, everything would have been fine, but they’re really had to warm up.

“Everyone’s doing different things, of course. Mercedes has more downforce than others, so they were going slower when I needed faster out laps. It was tricky.

“Traffic is part of the game, but twice we went in exactly the same group of cars, and that didn’t help us. I think we could have made it to Q3 and that would have been a great achievement.

“The positives are that the car feels better, but the negative is that we are P15.”

Team principal Guenther Steiner was satisfied with Haas’ first qualifying display in Monaco.

“I’m pretty happy with qualifying. Both drivers did a good job,” Steiner said.

“For Esteban to start 12th in Monte Carlo is great. The whole team reacted to the situations that came up in qualifying very well.

“Romain was on a fast lap when he lost time in the middle sector, so we still need to investigate what happened there, but overall we’re happy to start where we’re placed.

“If you line up between 10th and 16th, anything can happen, and providing we don’t get involved in any incidents, anything is possible.”

The Monaco Grand Prix is live on NBC from 7:30am ET on Sunday, with F1 Countdown beginning on NBCSN at 7am ET.

Raikkonen drops five places on Monaco grid after gearbox change

MONTE-CARLO, MONACO - MAY 26: Kimi Raikkonen of Finland driving the (7) Scuderia Ferrari SF16-H Ferrari 059/5 turbo (Shell GP) on track during practice for the Monaco Formula One Grand Prix at Circuit de Monaco on May 26, 2016 in Monte-Carlo, Monaco.  (Photo by Mark Thompson/Getty Images)
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Kimi Raikkonen will drop five places on the grid for Sunday’s Monaco Grand Prix after being hit with a penalty for changing his gearbox.

Raikkonen qualified sixth for Ferrari on Saturday, but will now start from 11th on the grid after the team made the change on his car following final practice earlier in the day.

The change on Raikkonen’s car came short of the six consecutive races that it is required to last, prompting FIA technical delegate Jo Bauer to refer the case to the stewards, who duly handed Raikkonen a five-place grid penalty.

Ferrari struggled to match the pace of Red Bull and Mercedes in qualifying as Sebastian Vettel could only finish fourth.

Raikkonen did qualify sixth behind Force India’s Nico Hulkenberg, but will now have to fight his way back up the order in Sunday’s race.

“The whole weekend has been quite tricky, but this morning the car felt a bit better and for qualifying we improved even more,” Raikkonen said.

“For sure we did the right things, but we struggled to make the tires work as we wanted. They were too much on the edge of the grip, the rear was slipping or the front was sliding and in a track like this when you don’t have a consistent good grip you lose a lot of time because of that.

“Obviously we are not happy of where we end up and the penalty due to the gearbox change for sure doesn’t help, but we’ll try to make the best out of it.

“We cannot predict what will happen tomorrow, for sure the race it’s not going to be easy, but usually many things happen here, we’ll try to get the most, to do the right calls in case of safety car and to take the right decisions.”

The Monaco Grand Prix is live on NBC from 7:30am ET on Sunday, with F1 Countdown beginning on NBCSN at 7am ET.

Karam: “From Carb Day to ‘500 race day for the Gas Monkey Energy car”

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Editor’s note: Sage Karam, a past champion in both the Indy Lights Presented by Cooper Tires and Cooper Tires USF2000 Championship Powered by Mazda series who finished ninth in his first Indianapolis 500 with DRR in 2014 at age 19, will file a series of blogs for NBCSports.com this month. Here’s his fourth entry, after Carb Day and with tomorrow’s Indianapolis 500 now set to launch. You can read his firstsecond and third blogs here.  He’ll run the No. 24 Gas Monkey Energy Chevrolet for Dreyer & Reinbold – Kingdom Racing. 

Wow, it’s the weekend of the 100th Indianapolis 500. And I’m ready to go.

We had Carb Day on Friday with all 33 drivers on the track for the final one-hour practice before the big race. As it did on Monday, the No. 24 Gas Monkey Energy Chevy felt good on Carb Day. It handles great in traffic. In fact, we stopped early in practice as the car felt very good.

Now, it’s the countdown for the world’s biggest race. I’ve been waiting some nine months to get back in a race car. And last year, my race was short at Indy (went out first turn of the first lap), but I’m back and feel great about Sunday’s classic race.

For the last two years, we have run the same configuration of chassis for me. I have become accustomed to it now. Now I don’t have the experience of a Scott Dixon or a Tony Kanaan. I don’t know if it’s our car or setup, but it is good in race trim. It’s the best kind of feeling I’ve had in a car here.

I think many of the other guys should fall off in the race. I think a lot of cars up front will fall back, and some guys don’t look good in race trim. It’s hard to pass. I feel like there will be a big pack. Guys who can get through the middle of corner should be good in the race.

It’s funny how things change here over the course of the month. I think there was one day in practice last week we tested, and we weren’t bad. I was eighth. I liked how the car was, but we made a big geometry change and then I was lost. We were 16th or 20th. The car was awful, and I couldn’t pass a soul. I felt like I was in Indy Lights car and getting the doors blown off. “Man, this will be an awful month,” I thought.

I told our guys that we need to go back to the car we had on Monday. We did, and right from the get-go it was better. We worked with it a bit. I was passing on demand! I could drive behind all five Andretti cars. This is a great race car. Obviously we missed it in qualifying.

After that bad day, I was telling you about being down in the dumps. I said, “Well, this stinks. I’m gonna run mid-pack and try make something out of it.” Then Monday happened and it was like a light switch went on. I felt super good. When you’re passing people it’s incredible… I passed guys who have won this race before.

And we have a strong team too. We have 90 percent of the same crew as my first year with Dreyer & Reinbold – Kingdom Racing in 2014. We have a good pit box, right at pit in. I can just focus on squaring it up every time. The guys are working so hard.

Photo: IndyCar
Photo: IndyCar

I expected to go to the finals again Friday in the Pit Stop Challenge. We got a tough call when we were put in the right lane – the asphalt lane. There wasn’t any grip there and I spun the tires out of the pit stop. The crew was fast but tires spun. I feel badly for the crew because they did a great job. I thought we could win it. Penske and Ganassi always bring it. I wanted to take the top dogs down Friday.

I’m a big believer in keeping the morale up at the team. Earlier this week, I was just wiping down my mechanic’s bike. He has a bike he rode to the track. I said “Hey, it’s the little things. You work for me and I work for you.” They love that stuff. They’ll be laser sharp focused for Sunday. We can make up time in the pits. Hopefully, by halfway, I can be where I need to be.

I have a shot at this race. I’ve been nervous since Monday. If you actually have a chance to win this race, it’s an incredible feeling. The 100th Indy 500 in general makes you feel good.

So how about becoming the youngest Indy 500 winner in history, and doing so in the 100th running of the Greatest Spectacle in Racing?”

Now that’s a great story, and I hope to pull it off this Sunday.



Kvyat escapes penalty despite failing technical check after Monaco qualifying

MONTE-CARLO, MONACO - MAY 28: Daniil Kvyat of Russia driving the (26) Scuderia Toro Rosso STR11 Ferrari 060/5 turbo on track during qualifying for the Monaco Formula One Grand Prix at Circuit de Monaco on May 28, 2016 in Monte-Carlo, Monaco.  (Photo by Lars Baron/Getty Images)
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Daniil Kvyat has escaped exclusion from qualifying for the Monaco Grand Prix despite his Toro Rosso car failing a technical check.

Kvyat qualified ninth in Monaco on Saturday, and was due to start the race from eighth on the grid after Kimi Raikkonen was given a grid penalty for a gearbox change.

However, Kvyat looked set to be excluded from qualifying when his car failed a front floor deflection test after the session.

“A front floor deflection test was carried on car number 26 [Kvyat],” FIA technical delegate Jo Bauer wrote.

“The vertical deflection under a vertical load of 4000 Newton exeeded 5mm.

“As this is not in compliance with Article 3.17.5 I am referring this matter to the stewards for their consideration.”

However, the stewards confirmed that Kvyat’s car had failed the test due to damage sustained during qualifying, prompting them to allow him to keep P8 on the grid.

“The team produced evidence that the car suffered an impact which reduced the downforce and resulted with a slower lap time than in Q2,” the stewards said.

“Therefore whilst technically the car failed to pass the deflection test, the stewards have decided not to impose any penalty. However the team is reminded that further tests will be conducted and that future failure of the test may not result in the same decision.

“The FIA technical team is requested to further study the telemetry produced by the team and provide a report to the Stewards if appropriate.”

Kvyat spoke of damage to his car that may have contributed to the floor failing the technical check after qualifying.

“I’m not happy with my qualifying today,” Kvyat said.

“I think I hit a curb hard in the third sector during my last run and I don’t know if this is maybe the reason why we lost a bit of time in Q3.

“The car certainly behaved differently compared to Q2, so we now have to analyze this, because we could’ve finished in a higher position than P9. It’s quite disappointing as we know we have a strong car with huge potential.

“Having said this, I’m confident for tomorrow, we have a good chance of scoring points and we will fight hard for them.”

The Monaco Grand Prix is live on NBC from 7:30am ET on Sunday, with F1 Countdown beginning on NBCSN at 7am.