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Kurt Busch validates “Double” decision with an outstanding month of May

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It’s been a decade since any one driver attempted to pull “The Double,” a feat of racing 1,100 miles on Memorial Day weekend.

Kurt Busch’s on Sunday was thwarted short of that milestone, due to an engine failure in the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series race at Charlotte Motor Speedway Sunday night.

But in no way should that diminish his accomplishments, and what he set out to achieve this month at the cathedral of speed that is the Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

Although Kurt goes by “The Outlaw,” and this month, “The Double Outlaw,” we were reminded very simply that Busch is still a badass driver who remains one of the best on the North American motorsports scene.

For Busch to come in and do what he did this month at Indianapolis exceeded most everyone’s expectations.

Heading into the month, other than a pair of one-off tests, he’d never driven an IndyCar and needed to be like a sponge in absorbing all the information he’d be taking in. He’d also need to prepare physically for the challenge.

Busch went in with the right approach, the right mentality and exuded a confidence and attitude that never went over the line in terms of cockiness.

He knew his place at Indy was as a rookie; he made sure to mention that in the myriad number of interviews he had to do throughout the month.

He always gave credit to his four Andretti Autosport teammates, a number which became five when backup driver EJ Viso temporarily filled in for James Hinchcliffe earlier in the month. And he praised the Andretti crew, with veteran Craig Hampson leading the No. 26 Suretone car’s effort and the rest of the engineering staff working in harmony to provide five Hondas with generally outstanding setups.

He gave everything he could in qualifying with his first 230-mph lap, then a 230-mph qualifying run over four laps.

When he made a mistake in practice, crashing in Turn 2 on the Monday before the race, he owned it. It was really the only time all month where he looked like a rookie; his lines both in single-car runs and in traffic were otherwise true to form of what you’d expect from the series regulars at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

And over 500 miles on Sunday, Busch managed the race in a way befitting of a guy who’s raced the event a dozen times or more, rather than one who was in his first ever open-wheel race.

Busch fell to the lower ranges of the top-20 early on but bided his time and waited for things to come to him. Twice, he took excellent evasive action when debris came flying at him. Scott Dixon’s front wing and the debris field after Townsend Bell’s accident both entered Busch’s path.

When he was done, Busch ended sixth overall, top first-timer. And yet he was fourth among the five Andretti Autosport cars, with Ryan Hunter-Reay, Marco Andretti and Carlos Munoz first, third and fourth, which spoke to the quality of the entire operation.

He’d done what he’d set out to do, for most of it anyway. What’s been a miserable NASCAR season, save for his Martinsville win, continued after he landed Sunday night in Charlotte with the engine failure.

What does this mean for Kurt, and “the double,” going forward? Several things.

Busch ran well enough to come back in 2015 on merit, if he so desires, and the Andretti team has the infrastructure to make it happen (they likely will, given they’ve added an extra car for the ‘500 each of 2012, 2013 and 2014).

And perhaps, Busch’s success could open the doors to other NASCAR drivers – Kasey Kahne, Kyle Busch and Kyle Larson come to mind off the top of my head – who could be as naturally adept in an IndyCar as was the 2004 NASCAR champ.

Kurt Busch has always been a wheel man. Now, he’s added top rookie finisher in the Indianapolis 500 to his list of accolades.

Outlaw? More like outstanding.

Takuma Sato formally confirmed with Andretti Autosport

HOUSTON, TX - JUNE 27: Takuma Sato of Japan, driver of the #14 ABC Supply A.J. Foyt Racing Dallara Honda sits in his car during practice for the Verizon IndyCar Series Shell and Pennzoil Grand Prix Of Houston at NRG Park on June 27, 2014 in Houston, Texas (Photo by Chris Trotman/Getty Images)
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Takuma Sato will join Andretti Autosport for the 2017 Verizon IndyCar Series season, and complete the team’s four-car full-season lineup.

The 39-year-old Japanese driver will begin his eighth season in IndyCar next year, in arguably his deepest opportunity yet driving the team’s No. 26 Honda.

“I am extremely excited that we were able to work out a deal with Michael and Andretti Autosport,” Sato said in a release. “With Honda an integral part of Andretti Autosport, it seemed like a great fit. The team has proven year after year that they are ultracompetitive on all types of circuits.

“Particularly the speed that team has shown in recent years at the Indy 500 were just incredible. I am also very impressed on how aggressively they have addressed their needs for 2017, and am really looking forward to working with my new environment and can’t wait to get started.”

Sato spent his first two seasons with the KVSH Racing team (then called KV Racing Technology), a year at Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing and the last four at A.J. Foyt Enterprises.

Sato delivered Foyt its first win in more than a decade when he won at Long Beach, 2013, and also has scored five poles in his career. While he’s yet to finish better than 13th in points, Sato has long been one of the more enjoyable drivers to watch in the series for his aggressive, “no attack, no chance” style.

Sato joins the returning trio of Ryan Hunter-Reay, Marco Andretti and Alexander Rossi within the team.

Team principal Michael Andretti said Sato’s results over his IndyCar career to date really haven’t done his talent, ability or development work justice.

“We’re excited to have Takuma; we think he’ll surprise and turn some heads,” Andretti told NBC Sports. “I think he’ll be in a situation that should help him a lot.

“With three good teammates, I think he is personally excited. This will be his best chance to get results since being in IndyCar.

“To me I really believe he’s one of the fastest guys in the paddock. When it comes to qualifying… it’ll help us in that area. It’ll be good in that feedback. I’m real happy with having him on board. He’s such a great kid, he won’t upset the chemistry. It’s a positive all the way around.”

Andretti also noted how key it was to have all four full-time entries confirmed this early in the offseason. The Rossi car with Andretti-Herta Autosport was only finalized in late February last year.

“I don’t think it’s ever been done since I’ve owned the team,” Andretti admitted. “Where we have all four cars this early, it helps us in terms of putting it together. It’s not a last-minute thing. That makes it a better effort.”

Garrett Mothershead, who worked with the departed Carlos Munoz at Andretti last year, will be Sato’s race engineer. Munoz now replaces Sato at Foyt next season.

Andretti said he expects to see commercial partnerships for Rossi and Sato’s cars announced in mid-January.

Nico Rosberg’s F1 retirement came as no surprise to Lewis Hamilton

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Lewis Hamilton says he was not surprised by Mercedes teammate and Formula 1 World Champion Nico Rosberg’s retirement announcement on Friday.

Hamilton lost out to Rosberg in the battle for the 2016 drivers’ championship, finishing five points shy of a fourth title in Abu Dhabi last weekend.

Rosberg announced on Friday ahead of the FIA prize giving in Vienna that he would be retiring from F1 with immediate effect, sending shockwaves through the sport.

However, Hamilton said that the news came as little surprise to him, given he has worked with Rosberg throughout his career and knows the German well.

“The sport will miss him but I wish him all the best,” Hamilton said at the press conference in Vienna, as quoted by F1i.

“I’m sure it was a surprise to many people. I’m probably one of the many people that it was not a surprise for but that’s because I’ve known him for a long, long time. But this is motor racing.

“This is the first time he’s won in 18 years, hence why it was not a surprise that he decided to stop. But also he’s got a family to focus on and probably wants to have more children. Formula 1 takes so much of your time.”

Rosberg’s decision brings an end to his fierce rivalry with Hamilton during their four years together as Mercedes teammates.

The two enjoyed a number of clashes both on- and off-track, but Hamilton said that he would miss not having Rosberg to go up against.

“We started karting when we were 13 and we would always talk about being champions,” Hamilton said.

“When I joined this team Nico was there which was something we spoke about when we were kids.

“It’s going to be very, very strange and for sure it will be sad to not have him in the team next year.”

Verstappen, Mercedes joke about vacant seat after Rosberg’s retirement

ABU DHABI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES - NOVEMBER 27: Max Verstappen of the Netherlands driving the (33) Red Bull Racing Red Bull-TAG Heuer RB12 TAG Heuer leads Nico Rosberg of Germany driving the (6) Mercedes AMG Petronas F1 Team Mercedes F1 WO7 Mercedes PU106C Hybrid turbo on track  during the Abu Dhabi Formula One Grand Prix at Yas Marina Circuit on November 27, 2016 in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.  (Photo by Clive Mason/Getty Images)
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In the wake of Nico Rosberg’s shock retirement announcement on Friday in Vienna, nearly every Formula 1 driver has been named as a possible replacement for the World Champion at Mercedes in 2017.

Fernando Alonso? Sebastian Vettel? Pascal Wehrlein? Esteban Ocon? Or how about Max Verstappen?

Ah, Verstappen. The young upstart who has turned the F1 world on its head since making his debut as a fresh-faced 17-year-old in 2015. Fast-forward to the present day, and he is the youngest ever grand prix winner (and still very fresh-faced).

While a move to Mercedes is, in reality, out of the question for 2017 given the nature of his Red Bull contract and status as one of F1’s hottest prospects, Verstappen was more than happy to engage in some banter on Twitter with the German manufacturer.

Verstappen notably had the chance to join Mercedes’ junior program back in 2014, but decided on a move to Red Bull instead after it promised him an F1 drive with Toro Rosso for 2015.

Stunned racing world reacts to Rosberg’s retirement on social media

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It is fair to say that nobody saw this coming.

Nico Rosberg’s decision to retire from Formula 1 just six days after clinching his maiden world championship has already sent shockwaves through the racing world.

To see a professional athlete bow out in such fashion is rare, particularly when they’re nowhere near retirement age. Alas, it seems that one world title was enough for Nico.

Here’s a round-up of how the racing world has reacted to Rosberg’s retirement on Twitter.