The 2014 Indy 500 rookie voting should have been fit to be tied

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Ties are not necessarily popular, but in some instances, they work.

Some Barclays Premier League matches and NHL hockey games are so hard fought by both squads that for one side to emerge ahead of the other doesn’t do justice to the other. After regulation and overtime, sometimes, draws happen.

And last night, a draw should have happened when it came to voting for the 2014 Sunoco Indianapolis 500 Rookie of the Year, because two first-year drivers performed extraordinarily this month under vastly different circumstances.

They are, of course, Kurt Busch and Sage Karam. While Busch captured the award, and justifiably, Karam’s efforts deserved a similar level of recognition.

Busch, now 35, has spent the last 15 years growing and developing in NASCAR. He’s won races, a Sprint Cup Series championship, then fallen out of favor with two of the sport’s most elite teams and performed an incredible career comeback after two years in the wilderness.

Karam, 19, was all of 5 years old when Busch started his first Sprint Cup race in 2000. But since he was 8, Karam and his family went to the mecca of open-wheel racing at Indianapolis Motor Speedway, dreaming of the day when he’d have the chance to race in the ‘500.

Busch enjoyed sampling whatever he could get his hands on away from Cup – Michel Jourdain’s Champ Car in 2003, an NHRA Pro Stock car and an Australian V8 Supercar to name a few.

Karam progressed through the traditional Mazda Road to Indy ladder, winning championships in USF2000 and Indy Lights, and winning races in Star Mazda.

Together, they arrived at this year’s Indianapolis 500 both with rookie status, but with completely different agendas and operations to work with.

For Busch, a preliminary test in 2013 with Andretti Autosport was the first step toward a debut that could serve as a major media and marketing storyline.

For Karam, his 2013 offseason was one of trying everything he could to graduate to a full-time ride in IndyCar through the efforts of his family, his management and his support team. While that didn’t occur, he did catch the eye of Chip Ganassi, who signed him to a developmental driver contract.

Karam dazzled in two sports car starts at Daytona and Sebring, drawing praise from Ganassi and his pair of Target-backed Indy 500 winners and series champions, Scott Dixon and Tony Kanaan.

Ultimately Karam was able to put a deal together, in a one-off Dreyer & Reinbold Kingdom Racing Chevrolet that, while CGR-assisted, was almost entirely DRR-crewed. The car was the embodiment of the power of partnerships.

Karam had four unofficial teammates at CGR, plus CGR advisor Dario Franchitti; Busch had four actual teammates at Andretti Autosport.

Busch learned methodically; Karam learned rapidly and largely on his own, in the team’s first IndyCar start in a year.

They both had their one “Welcome to Indy, rookie,” moment.

Busch whacked the Turn 2 wall on the Monday before the race, and his No. 26 Suretone Entertainment Honda was trashed, requiring a backup car.

Karam had his on Carb Day when he lost it exiting Turn 4, but made an absolutely wicked save to hang onto his No. 22 Comfort Revolution/Big Machine Records/Brantley Gilbert Chevrolet from hitting either the inside retaining wall or the pit wall.

Karam starred during the Tag Heuer Pit Stop Competition, making it to the finals and stirring up the crowd with his celebrations.

In the race, both drove like veterans in avoiding the pitfalls that plagued so many others.

Karam made passes you wouldn’t expect many a veteran to try; Busch had catlike reflexes to avoid flying debris on two instances.

They both ended in the top 10, Busch in sixth and Karam in ninth, the two best drivers of a seven-pack of rookies that all finished the race.

While Busch was a first-timer on Sunday in IndyCar, Karam was a rookie. So giving just Busch the Rookie of the Year title doesn’t do justice to Karam’s effort all month.

It also opens up the Pandora’s Box where if a NASCAR driver comes into the Indianapolis 500 and does as well as Busch does, they could take the ROTY title almost by default.

What does that say for young drivers who come through the open-wheel ladder, traditionally, that they then have to battle NASCAR drivers to get the recognition for being the best standard first-timer at IndyCar’s most prestigious race?

Was Busch impressive all month? No question. But Karam’s efforts deserve the plaudits, as well.

We have a precedent for this, too, because in 2002 Alex Barron was the top finishing first-year driver in fourth, and Tomas Scheckter, who led the most laps, was the star attraction of the race before crashing off Turn 4. Both were awarded the co-ROTY honors.

In 2014, Busch was your top finisher, and Karam was the first-year star attraction.

But the voters got it wrong. Karam should have gotten a piece of the pie, as well.

Vettel refusing to be misled by Mercedes’ F1 practice pace in Russia

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Sebastian Vettel is refusing to read too much into Ferrari’s impressive Formula 1 practice pace in Russia on Friday, saying it is easy to be “misled” by rival team Mercedes.

Vettel arrived in Russia for the fourth round of the season after making the best start to a campaign by a Ferrari driver since Michael Schumacher in 2004, winning two of the first three races.

Vettel continued Ferrari’s impressive showing to start 2017 by dominating second practice on Friday at the Sochi Autodrom, finishing over half a second clear of Mercedes drivers Lewis Hamilton and Valtteri Bottas.

However, Vettel is refusing to take too much from the result, citing Mercedes’ jump in pace from Friday to Saturday in Russia last year as a reason why not to.

“I think Mercedes will be fine. It’s a circuit that suits them, so they will be strong tomorrow,” Vettel said after practice, as quoted by the official F1 website.

“I don’t want to make this personal but I think last year people expected Williams to be the fastest after Friday if I remember right, and obviously it turned out Mercedes were.

“That’s how sometimes you can be misled. I think there are a lot of things we can play with in the car, loads, engines modes. At this track especially there are a lot of things you can show or not show.

“I think the most important [thing] is that we talk about ourselves, our balance, and I think we improved throughout the session so I’m reasonably happy.”

Vettel will be chasing Ferrari’s first pole since the 2015 Singapore Grand Prix on Saturday, with qualifying live on CNBC from 8am ET.

Hamilton endures ‘difficult’ Russia F1 practice, impressed by Ferrari

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Lewis Hamilton was left disappointed by a “difficult” day of Formula 1 practice in Russia on Friday for Mercedes as Ferrari stole a march on the field.

Hamilton arrived in Sochi looking to take his third win in Russia and claw back the championship lead after falling seven points behind Ferrari’s Sebastian Vettel in the standings.

The Briton was left to settle for fourth place in the final timesheets in FP2 as Mercedes struggled to match Ferrari’s one-lap pace, finishing over half a second back from Vettel in P1.

“Bit of a difficult day for us,” Hamilton admitted. “We managed to complete everything that we needed to do on our runs, but in terms of the balance of the car, the Ferrari seemed very, very fast on the long runs.

“So we need to work out how we can improve our pace. But there’s still everything to play for. The tires feel very peaky, so it’s easy to drop out of the window of performance, but when they’re working they seem to be good.”

Teammate Valtteri Bottas finished third-fastest in FP2 for Mercedes, and said the team had work to do overnight to ensure it could get the maximum out of the ultra-soft tire for qualifying.

“It’s been an interesting day. It’s a very different situation here with the asphalt and the temperatures compared to what we experienced in Bahrain,” Bottas said.

“We were learning about the tires on long runs and short runs and it seems like over one lap we still have work to do to get the maximum out of the ultra-soft tire – that’s our focus tonight. But we can’t forget how important the race is.

“We have started the weekend in the right way. The car feels good and the balance is there. A good start but we definitely need to work hard to find some lap time for qualifying.”

Qualifying for the Russian Grand Prix is live on CNBC from 8am ET on Saturday.

Stoffel Vandoorne set for 15-place F1 grid drop in Sochi

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Stoffel Vandoorne is set to receive a 15-place grid penalty for this weekend’s Formula 1 Russian Grand Prix after exceeding the number of permitted power units components for the season.

McLaren’s problems with engine supplier Honda have been well-documented, with a revision of the design of the power unit by the Japanese manufacturer backfiring to create further reliability and performance issues.

Vandoorne has taken the brunt of the issues in 2017, failing to score a point and recording just one classified finish – P13 in Australia, two laps down on the lead car – as well as being forced to change a number of components on his power unit.

Drivers are only permitted to use four of each power unit component across the course of the season before triggering a penalty, but Vandoorne’s usage has been so high that he is set to receive a grid drop for the Russian Grand Prix – only the fourth round of the season.

By taking an all-new power unit for the event in Sochi, Vandoorne has moved onto his fifth MGU-H and fifth turbocharger of the year, combining for a 15-place grid penalty on Sunday.

For every other ‘fifth’ component Vandoorne takes this season, he will receive another five-place grid drop. His first ‘sixth’ component will be worth 10 places; every remaining ‘sixth’ is five places; his first ‘seventh’ is 10 places and so on.

Ferrari dominates Russian GP second free practice

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Once Pirelli’s softest compound, the ultrasoft tires, came out to play in second free practice for this weekend’s Russian Grand Prix at the Sochi Autodrom, Scuderia Ferrari dropped the hammer compared to Mercedes AMG Petronas.

Ferrari’s Sebastian Vettel and Kimi Raikkonen ran at 1:34.120 and 1:34.383, respectively, in the pair of SF70H chassis – which easily eclipsed the Mercedes pair of Lewis Hamilton and Valtteri Bottas. This followed Raikkonen’s leading FP1 this morning.

It’s only practice but the thinking going into the race weekend was with a couple long straights, it would play to Mercedes’ strengths and its top-end speed. But Ferrari’s fired a warning salvo into that thinking in this session.

Bottas and Hamilton were six and seven tenths adrift on the same ultrasoft tires, before long runs commenced for the final 35 to 40 or so minutes of the 90-minute free practice. The Russian Grand Prix is expected to be a one-stop race.

Red Bull’s Max Verstappen and Daniel Ricciardo were next, far off the top four and far ahead of the midfield. Verstappen’s session ended early inside of 20 minutes, as he parked his car with an apparent loss of power just before pit lane.

Williams’ Felipe Massa, Renault’s Nico Hulkenberg, Haas’ Kevin Magnussen and Force India’s Sergio Perez – making it four teams in as many positions from seventh through 10th in the crowded midfield. In fact while 1.790 seconds covered first to sixth, just 1.18 seconds covered seventh to 18th, covering all remaining teams!

Romain Grosjean, who tries new Carbon Industrie brakes this week, made several radio transmissions noting he wasn’t yet satisfied with the new supplier. There’s still been a lot of brake dust released from the fronts on both his and Magnussen’s car.

Meanwhile further down the grid, McLaren Honda has made yet another power unit change to Stoffel Vandoorne’s car, which cost him the opening minutes of the session. This will resign the Belgian to his fifth turbocharger and MGU-H of the season, and see him saddled with a grid penalty.

FP3 is next up, streaming online live on Saturday morning from 5 a.m. ET. Qualifying commences at 8 a.m. ET live on CNBC.