DeltaWing Tech unveils road car rendering

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DeltaWing Technologies Inc. today revealed how the groundbreaking DeltaWing® architecture – a highly aerodynamic and lightweight design currently competing in IMSA sports car road races in the form of the DeltaWing race car – could look as a street-legal, four-passenger car.

The rendering depicts an exciting, aerodynamic car design that evokes motion, energy and speed even at a standstill and is unlike any of today’s road-going automobiles. And yet the innovative DeltaWing® shape is a true form-follows-function design that can significantly reduce aerodynamic drag to help increase fuel efficiency. Another attribute of the shape is considerably less overall mass. When combined with light-yet-strong materials such as lightweight steel, aluminum and advanced composite materials, the result is a car that can deliver any given performance level with significantly reduced fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions compared to conventional automobiles.

Intended as a solution for manufacturers facing more stringent fuel economy and emissions standards, the platform offers efficiency benefits whether using new generation smaller and lighter high efficiency gas or diesel powertrains, alternative fuels like compressed natural gas (CNG), or today’s and tomorrow’s hybrid and all-electric powerplants. DeltaWing Technologies Inc. intends to partner with mass-market auto companies that share its vision rather than manufacture independently, thus offering cars with the DeltaWing® architecture to a broad global audience and significantly expanding the design’s efficiency and environmental benefits.

The narrow-track front wheelbase incorporates smaller width tires. The rear-engine design places the center of gravity far to the rear. That results in significantly less weight on the front axles, reducing rolling resistance and further increasing efficiency. Handling is extraordinarily agile, as proven by the narrow front track of the DeltaWing race car competing on America’s most challenging road courses in the IMSA-sanctioned TUDOR United SportsCar Championship.

“Many of the aerodynamic, lightweight and handling benefits of the race car can translate to the street,” said Don Panoz, chairman of DeltaWing Technologies Inc. “We are competing at the highest levels of road racing with half the weight, half the horsepower, and nearly half of the fuel consumption. We believe we can deliver similar results on the street without compromising safety, comfort and performance. We have a formula that’s highly efficient and still fun to drive.”

Panoz also said the DeltaWing race car proves teams do not have to rely heavily on horsepower to be competitive. “Design, technology, efficient use of lightweight materials, lower horsepower and lower fuel consumption is a winning formula. I believe this is the future of motorsports, and key to meeting the next decade’s fuel economy and emissions standards.”

More information can be found on the DeltaWing website.

McLaren unveils 2018 F1 car, the MCL33

Photo: Getty Images
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McLaren F1 Team became the latest to launch their 2018 challenger on Friday, taking the covers off their new MCL33 chassis early on Friday morning.

McLaren endured a difficult 2017 season of the FIA Formula 1 World Championship, with their partnership with Honda eventually dissolving after a troublesome power unit saw them plagued by unreliability and low power.

A switch to Renault power units is expected to see them get an uptick in form, and the MCL33 chassis itself is actually an evolution on last year’s MCL32. Still, the team highlighted areas to improve upon, and aims for a return to prominence in 2018.

“The McLaren team was created by a brave pioneer, and has had bravery at its core ever since. Whether it’s been with brave drivers, brave leaders or brave fortune, this team has always fought back. And we definitely view 2018 as the year when McLaren will move closer to the front, fighting teams and drivers as we improve our fortunes,” said Zak Brown, executive director of McLaren Technology Group.

Brown also highlighted the car’s new papaya orange livery, a throwback to some of the most popular color schemes that have adorned McLaren entrants in a variety of disciplines. Brown indicated that this came about from requests of fans who wanted to see such a livery return to the McLaren marque.

“Our return to a papaya orange livery for this year wasn’t simply an emotional decision; it demonstrates that we are listening to our fans, building deeper engagement with them and the Formula 1 community as a whole. We want McLaren to earn respect on and off the track, and this felt like a good starting point. We want to show everyone what makes this team special, whether that’s our fans or our partners – there’s room for more on our journey.”

The team’s racing director Eric Boullier expressed optimism about the team’s potential for 2018, but also acknowledged the season will be sure to see its fair share of challenges.

“I think the whole team feels proud of this car,” he asserted. “The design, engineering and aerodynamic departments have done an incredible job delivering a new car with a new power unit in an extremely short timeframe. We never took the easy route or looked to shortcut a process or a solution; and the result is a car that is neat and well-resolved.

“That said, we are under no illusions that it will be difficult to splinter the hegemony at the front; and that the midfield will be full of well-funded, experienced outfits with plenty to prove. We are humble about the challenge ahead, but feel we’ve prepared well, have a solid package that we can build upon and exploit as the season progresses, and have two excellent drivers who will make the difference in races.”

The MCL33 took to the track on Friday for filming at a test track in Spain, and will be run in anger for the first time when testing begins next week at the Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya.

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