Indy 500 Insights: Townsend Bell recaps one of his best ever drives

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Every year, Townsend Bell puts together a one-off Indianapolis 500 program. The 2014 edition was Bell’s eighth ‘500 appearance, after making his debut in 2006 and running every year consecutively since 2008. This year, he returned to KV Racing Technology, the team where he posted his career-best ‘500 finish of fourth in 2009, and where he seeks to improve upon it this year. The NBC Sports Group Verizon IndyCar Series analyst is able to provide both a driver’s an analyst’s perspective in the field. After a weeklong daily build-up series (See links Part 1-6 here), Townsend recapped what was an amazing drive that came up just short of ‘500 glory.

It’s not an official line, but there’s a definite school of thought in the Indianapolis 500 that you’d rather finish in the 20s going for the win than end in the top-10 after a ho-hum day.

Better to be remembered than be anonymous.

And it’s going to be easy to remember how good a drive Townsend Bell put in at this year’s ‘500. Yeah, he ended 25th when all was said and done after a late-race accident, but I’m going to guess this run turned in Sunday will stand out more in the minds of fans compared to his career-best run of fourth in 2009.

“It was similar to 2011 where we were competitive all day, and we qualified up front there,” Bell said. “This race we started at back; it was my worst ever qualifying but possibly my best ever race car in terms of getting through traffic.”

Indeed it was the first stint, where Bell progressively moved from P25 on the grid up to P19, then into the top-15 and then just to the fringes of the top-10, where it was apparent how much the No. 6 Robert Graham-Royal Purple-Beneteau USA Chevrolet was hooked up.

It was a nice carryover from Carb Day, where Bell ended third. The car ran better in hotter track temperatures.

“We knew we’d be strong and the first stint was fantastic,” Bell explained. “But then I had some trouble getting past Kanaan; had contact with the left rear. We were a little wounded on balance. But we still got up there thanks to great pit stops from guys.”

Bell endured despite the toe link contact and kept within the top five. He restarted second on Lap 176, just before the moment that he and Ed Carpenter were side-by-side in Turn 1. Once James Hinchcliffe made a three-wide passing attempt, that led to contact and took the top two starters out of the race.

Bell pressed on but lost ground on the final restart before the rear let go with just under 10 laps remaining in Turn 2.

“Being up to second with 20 to go, we plodded to come back on, but the left rear toe link let go, and absolutely released itself in a cruel way. It was a big hit,” he said.

The message of the race Bell relayed during Monday night’s Victory Awards Celebration was one of “We got this,” which he did, until the moment in Turn 2 when he said “For a second I thought, ‘I don’t got this.’”

What Bell did have throughout the Month of May was a crew, assembled just for the race, who rocked it and kept him in contention on pit road all day.

“My engineer Gerald Tyler made great decisions on downforce. And I was really proud of all my guys, from my crew chief, Didier, and the rest of the crew,” he said. “They were all recruited to come in for a one-off program. When it really counted, they gained me positions against the best teams in the series.”

This weekend Bell races in the TUDOR United SportsCar Championship in his No. 555 AIM Autosport Ferrari 458 Italia GT3 with co-driver Bill Sweedler, where the pair lead the GT Daytona points standings entering the weekend.

After that, it’s onto Texas on June 7, where Bell will resume his commentary duties.

Takuma Sato’s likeness revealed on Borg-Warner Trophy (PHOTOS)

Photos; Walt Kuhn
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INDIANAPOLIS – Rather than the traditional December unveil, this year’s reveal newest likeness added to the Borg-Warner Trophy came Tuesday at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Museum.

Takuma Sato got to see the result of the sculpting done by William Behrends and then turned from wax, clay and ceramic into sterling silver on Tuesday evening, as the winner of the 101st Indianapolis 500 presented by PennGrade Motor Oil saw his face revealed on the trophy.

Sato took the No. 26 Ruoff Home Mortgage Honda for Andretti Autosport to the win in thrilling fashion this year over Helio Castroneves, denying the Brazilian his fourth Indianapolis 500 victory in the process. It atoned for his near-miss in 2012, driving for Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing, the team he’ll return to in 2018.

It’s been a whirlwind last week-plus for Sato, doing the podium interviews at the Japanese Grand Prix, reflecting on his Indianapolis 500 triumph, then sharing the victory spoils with another Japanese pilot in Yoshihide Muroya, who won the Red Bull Air Race World Championship at Indianapolis this weekend.

Photos of Sato’s face on the most unique trophy in sports are below. This post will be updated following tonight’s full unveil. (All photos: Walt Kuhn)