Did Darrell Waltrip just drop bombshell: Edwards to Penske, Biffle to MWR?

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Old DW may have just spilled the beans on where Carl Edwards and Greg Biffle will wind up next season.

And if Darrell Waltrip’s body language and hinting is any indication, neither driver will be back with Roush Fenway Racing.

During Sunday’s prerace show on FOX, anchor Chris Myers asked Waltrip if the two free agents are leaving RFR, and if so, where will their new home in 2015 be.

The first part of Waltrip’s reply wasn’t totally surprising.

“Here’s my prediction,” Waltrip said. “Carl will stay with Ford. I don’t know if it’ll stay at Roush. It might be with Penske, but he will stay with Ford.”

But then Waltrip dropped an obvious bombshell.

Reaching over to put his right hand on the shoulder of younger brother Michael, who just happens to own Michael Waltrip Racing, DW’s body language and then verbiage said it all – and left Michael staring straight ahead almost in shock.

“And Greg Biffle will go to some two-car team that maybe one time had a third car,” Darrell Waltrip said.

(MWR was a three-car team prior to this season, after NAPA left at the end of 2013 in the fallout of the race manipulation scandal at Richmond last fall.)

In an attempt to quickly try and cover up what his older brother just said – and obviously deflect that scenario (probably because MWR isn’t ready to make a potential announcement yet) – Michael gave his take on it.

With a very non-plussed look upon his face.

“Uhhhhhh, I think Carl goes and Greg stays,” Michael Waltrip said. “I think the Biff stays at Roush, he’s going to be the veteran, the anchor to that rookie lineup for the young guys that are going to race at Roush. So, he goes, the other cat stays.”

By saying “he goes” after just talking about Biffle, there’s an implication that Michael may have just confirmed what Darrell predicted.

Don’t you just love brotherly love?

Updated: MWR co-owner Rob Kaufman tweeted this about an hour after Waltrip’s report, adding further ammo to DW’s analysis.

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Neuville wins Rally Australia; Ogier takes FIA WRC title

Sebastien Ogier. Photo: Getty Images
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COFFS HARBOUR, Australia (AP) Belgium’s Thierry Neuville won Rally Australia by 22.5 seconds on Sunday as torrential rain added drama to the last day of the last race of the World Rally Championship season.

Neuville entered the final day with an almost 20 second advantage after inheriting the rally lead Saturday when his Hyundai teammate, defending champion Andreas Mikkelsen crashed and was forced to retire for the day.

His lead was halved by Jari-Matti Latvala early Sunday as monsoon-like rain made conditions treacherous on muddy forest stages on the New South Wales coast. The rain stopped on the short Wedding Bells stage where Neuville was almost 5 seconds quicker than his rivals, stretching his lead to 14.7 seconds entering the last stage.

COFFS HARBOUR, AUSTRALIA – NOVEMBER 17: Thierry Neuville of Belgium and Nicolas Gilsoul of Belgium compete in their Hyundai Motorsport WRT Hyundai i20 coupe WRC during Day One of the WRC Australia on November 17, 2017 in COFFS HARBOUR, Australia. (Photo by Massimo Bettiol/Getty Images)

That stage was full of incident. The driver’s door on Neuville’s Hyundai i20 coupe swung open in the middle of the stage and Neuville had to slam it closed as he approached a corner.

Latvala’s Toyota then crashed seconds from the end of the stage, allowing Estonia’s Ott Tanak, in a Ford, to take second place overall and New Zealalnd’s Haydon Paddon, in a Hyundai, to sneak into third.

Sebastian Ogier was fourth after winning the final, power stage but the Frenchman had already clinched his fifth world title before Rally Australia began. Neuville’s win was his fourth of the season, two more than Ogier, and was enough to give him second place in world drivers’ standings for the third time in five years.

Ogier owed his drivers’ title to his consistency: he retired only once and finished no worse than fifth all season.

Neuville admitted the last day was touch and go as the rain made some stages perilous, forcing the cancellation of the second to last stage.

“That was a hell of a ride,” Neuville said. “Really, really tricky conditions.

“I kept the car on the road but it was close sometimes. I knew I could make a difference but I had to be clever. You lose grip, you lose control and the car doesn’t respond to your input.”