Helio Castroneves delivers Detroit sweep for Penske with Dual 2 win

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In Saturday’s first race of the Verizon IndyCar Series’ doubleheader at Detroit’s Belle Isle Park, Helio Castroneves’ bid for victory was undone by a pit strategy that didn’t work out.

But in today’s 70-lapper on the unforgiving street circuit, Castroneves followed through on his strong pace throughout the weekend and withstood a couple of late restarts to claim his third career victory (CART – 2000, 2001) on the island in the Detroit River.

His triumph completed a Chevrolet Indy Dual in Detroit sweep for Team Penske, whose namesake, Roger Penske, was a driving force in bringing IndyCar racing back to Belle Isle starting in 2012. Penske teammate and Dual 1 winner Will Power overcame an early drive-through penalty for avoidable contact to finish second today.

“Yesterday, it was the frustration – it was great that Will won but it was frustration for our side because we knew what car we had,” an exuberant Castroneves told ESPN. “But we demonstrated that today.”

Last weekend, Castroneves suffered a narrow defeat at the Indianapolis 500 to Ryan Hunter-Reay, who denied him the chance to earn his fourth win in the world’s greatest race.

But according to the Brazilian, that loss proved motivational for himself and his Penske comrades.

“The Indy 500 – it just [made something click],” he said. “It made us hungry. And here I am, in Victory Circle. I wanted it so bad, and more than anything, I want this championship.

“It’s great to be back here in Victory Circle, especially in the place where I won my first race…I just can’t believe it. This is an awesome day! Whoo-hoo!”

Power and Castroneves both leap-frogged Hunter-Reay in the championship, with the Aussie now holding a 19-point edge going into the Firestone 600 at Texas Motor Speedway (Next Saturday, 8 p.m. ET, NBCSN and NBC Sports Live Extra).

Hunter-Reay, the Indy winner, suffered a second disastrous result in as many days, when he bowed out after 61 laps with an electrical failure. He’s now 27 points behind Power.

As the second half of the race wore on, it appeared Castroneves would have a proper Sunday cruise to the champagne. But his 9.4-second lead over Power was erased when Sebastien Bourdais found the tire barriers in Turn 5 to bring out a race-changing caution with 12 laps to go.

Castroneves was able to get a perfect restart with seven laps left, but shortly after, Marco Andretti knocked Takuma Sato into those same Turn 5 tires to trigger another yellow and bunch up the field again.

That set the stage for one more restart with three to go, but Power didn’t get near Castroneves as the field headed for the green flag. Castroneves promptly pulled away and beat Power to the checkered flag by 1.7 seconds.

After the race, Power admitted that he decided to hang back late.

“Because of Roger, I definitely wasn’t going to race him hard,” he said. “Unless [Castroneves] made a mistake, I wasn’t going to go for a move unless I was close. But, it was a great day for Chevy, Roger at his home track and Chevy’s backyard. It’s just fantastic.”

Power was penalized for a bold move on Lap 1, when he attempted to get past Josef Newgarden on the inside at Turn 3. Instead, he hit Newgarden, who went into the tires and collected Graham Rahal and Justin Wilson with him.

Newgarden, Rahal, and Wilson all continued on, but Power didn’t escape the wrath of Race Control and was tagged for avoidable contact. However, as Power’s aggressive driving in the remainder of the race proved, the penalty did not chasten him one iota.

“I went up the inside and I don’t think Josef saw me,” Power said about the incident. “It wasn’t a very hard hit and I have to see the replay to kind of comment on what the call was.”

Behind the two Penske pilots were two from their arch-rivals at Chip Ganassi Racing. Charlie Kimball and Scott Dixon both roared from the back of the grid to finish third and fourth, respectively; for Kimball, it’s his first IndyCar podium since winning last year at Mid-Ohio.

Both men were able to get past Andretti Autosport’s James Hinchcliffe in the final three-lap dash, causing him to settle for fifth at the track he considers as sort of a second home due to his homeland of Canada being nearby.

VERIZON INDYCAR SERIES – CHEVROLET INDY DUAL IN DETROIT, RACE 2
Belle Isle Park
Unofficial Results in order of finish, starting position in parentheses, driver, team-engine, and reason out (if any):

1. (3) Helio Castroneves, Penske-Chevy
2. (8) Will Power, Penske-Chevy
3. (20) Charlie Kimball, Ganassi-Chevy
4. (22) Scott Dixon, Ganassi-Chevy
5. (2) James Hinchcliffe, Andretti-Honda
6. (7) Simon Pagenaud, SPM-Honda
7. (16) Mikhail Aleshin, SPM-Honda
8. (6) Carlos Munoz, Andretti-Honda
9. (17) Tony Kanaan, Ganassi-Chevy
10. (5) Ryan Briscoe, Ganassi-Chevy
11. (4) Mike Conway, Carpenter-Chevy
12. (13) Justin Wilson, Coyne-Honda
13. (15) Juan Pablo Montoya, Penske-Chevy
14. (19) Jack Hawksworth, Herta-Honda
15. (12) Carlos Huertas, Coyne-Honda
16. (18) Marco Andretti, Andretti-Honda
17. (10) Josef Newgarden, SFHR-Honda, -1 lap
18. (1) Takuma Sato, Foyt-Honda, -1 lap
19. (21) Ryan Hunter-Reay, Andretti-Honda, Lap 61 – Electrical
20. (11) Sebastien Bourdais, KVSH-Chevy, Lap 58 – Contact
21. (14) Graham Rahal, RLL-Honda, Lap 43 – Contact
22. (9) Sebastian Saavedra, KV/AFS-Chevy, Lap 9 – Contact

Race Statistics: Winner’s average speed: 93.211 mph; Time of race: One hour, 45 minutes, 53.3410 seconds; Margin of victory: 1.6836 seconds; Cautions: 4 for 13 laps; Lead changes: 7 among 7 drivers.

Lap Leaders: Sato, 1-10; Hinchcliffe, 11-20; Conway, 21-24; Power, 25-26; Aleshin, 27; Castroneves, 28-33; Hawksworth, 34; Castroneves, 35-70.

Point Standings: Power 326, Castroneves 307, Hunter-Reay 299, Pagenaud 247, Andretti 227, Munoz 210, Montoya 187, Dixon 184, Wilson 173, Bourdais 170.

Street race in Vietnam could lead Formula One’s Asia expansion

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TOKYO (AP) — Formula One is expected to add more races in Asia, including a street circuit in the capital of Vietnam, a country with little auto racing history that is on the verge of getting a marquee event.

“We think Hanoi could come on in the next couple of years, and we’re working with the Hanoi government to that end,” Sean Bratches, Formula One’s managing director of commercial operations, told the Associated Press.

There is even speculation it could be on the schedule next season, which Bratches rebuffed.

Vietnam would join countries like Azerbaijan, Russia and Bahrain, which have Grand Prix races, little history in the sport, and authoritarian governments with deep pockets that serve F1 as it tries to expand into new markets.

“This (Hanoi) is a street race where we can go downtown, where we can activate a large fan base,” Bratches said. “And you have extraordinary iconography from a television standpoint.”

A second race in China is also likely and would join Shanghai on the F1 calendar. Bratches said deciding where to stage the GP will “be left to local Chinese partners” – Beijing is a strong candidate.

Bratches runs the commercial side of Formula One, which was acquired last year by U.S.-based Liberty Media from long-time operator Bernie Ecclestone.

Formula One’s long-term goal is to have 24-25 races – up from the present 21 – and arrange them in three geographical segments: Asia, Europe and the Americas. Bratches said the Europe-based races would stay in middle of the calendar, with Asia or the Americas opening or ending the season.

He said their positioning had not been decided, and getting this done will be slowed by current contracts that mandate specific places on the calendar for several races. This means eventually that all the races in Asia would be run together, as would races in Europe and the Americas.

The F1 schedule is now an inefficient jumble, allowing Bratches to take a good-natured poke at how the sport was run under Ecclestone.

“We’ve acquired an undermanaged asset that’s 67-years-old, but effectively a start-up,” Bratches said.

Early-season races in Australia and China this year were conducted either side of a trip to Bahrain in the Middle East. Late in the season Formula One returns to Asia with races in Japan and Singapore.

The Canadian GP this season is run in the middle of the European swing, separated by four months from the other races in the Americas – the United States, Mexico and Brazil. These three are followed by the season-ending race in Abu Dhabi, which means another trip across the globe.

“With the right economics, with the right structure and cadence of events across territories, 24 or 25 is probably where we’d like to be from a longer-term standpoint,” Bratches said.

Big changes are not likely to happen until the 2020 season ends. This is when many current rules and contracts expire as F1’s new owners try to redistribute some income to allow smaller teams to compete.

“There’s more interest than we have capacity in the schedule,” Bratches said, firing off Berlin, Paris or London as potentially attractive venues. “We want to be very selective.”

“Those cites from an economic impact standpoint would find us value, as do others around the world,” Bratches added. “It’s very important for us as we move forward to go to locations that are a credit to the Formula One brand.”

An expanded schedule would have to be approved by the teams, which will be stretched by the travel and the wear-and-tear on their crews. The burden will fall on the smaller teams, which have significantly smaller revenue compared with Ferrari, Mercedes or Red Bull.

Bratches also envisions another race in the U.S., joining the United States Grand Prix held annually in Austin, Texas. A street race in Miami is a strong candidate, as are possible venues like Las Vegas or New York.

“We see the United States and China as countries that could support two races,” he said.

Liberty Media has reported Formula One’s total annual revenue at $1.8 billion, generated by fees paid by promoters, broadcast rights, advertising and sponsorship. Race promotion fees also tend to be higher in Asia, which makes the area attractive – along with a largely untapped fan base.

In a four-year cycle, F1 generates more revenue than FIFA or the International Olympic Committee, which rely almost entirely on one-time showcase events.

Reports suggest Vietnamese promoters may pay between $50-60 million annually as a race fee, with those fees paid by the government. Bratches said 19 of 21 Formula One races are supported by government payments.

“The race promotion fee being derived from the government … is a model that has worked historically,” Bratches said.