Photo: Krohn Racing

Le Mans: Krohn Racing’s logistics for last-minute trip

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Krohn Racing received a late invitation to the 2014 24 Hours of Le Mans race and had a very short window in which to prepare their Ferrari F458 and get all their racing equipment and team members to Le Mans, France in time for the official start of the week’s activities. A 17-day turnaround of all race equipment and personnel was all the Krohn Team had for all logistical movements.

Below are some interesting facts and timeline specifics about the complexities of the logistical effort:

  • Krohn Racing received a call from the ACO on Friday, May 23, 2014, that they were officially invited to participate in the 2014 running of the 24 Hours of Le Mans, June 14-15.
  • First official ACO event that Krohn Racing needed to attend was ACO scrutineering on Monday, June 9 at 3:30 p.m.
  • Three Krohn crew members flew on June 2, via Milan, Italy, to Padova, Italy to the Michelotto shop to assist with the transformation of the Ferrari F458 from IMSA specs to the 2014 Le Mans GTE-Am aerodynamics package and Le Mans race engine installation
  • Over 8,650 kilograms (19,000 lbs) of Ferrari racecar, spare parts, and the Ferrari engine were shipped from Houston, Texas to Le Mans, France, via air, water, and land
  • In the process of shipping parts and the car, the following transportation vehicles were used: a small van, a 40-foot curtain side truck, a car transporter, a 53-foot semi truck, a ferry, a Boeing 777, and a Boeing 747
  • On May 30, the No. 57 Krohn Racing Ferrari’s spare parts were driven from Houston to Chicago, and were then put on a plane to London Heathrow airport on June 1. Once they arrived in London on June 2, the parts were driven and also rode a ferry to get to the Le Mans paddock from June 5-6. This task required seven days, door-to-door, and 12 people.
  • The Krohn Racing Ferrari and engine had to make a stop in Padova, Italy at Michelotto’s shop on their journey from Houston to Le Mans. On May 28, the car traveled from Houston to Luxembourg and then on to Padova on May 31.
  • On May 27 the Ferrari engine was flown from Houston to London Heathrow, and rode in a van through the Chunnel under the English Channel, arriving at Michelotto in Italy on May 29
  • Seven different destinations were involved in Krohn Racing’s journey to the 24 Hours of Le Mans: the Houston George Bush Intercontinental Airport, Chicago O’Hare International Airport, London Heathrow Airport, Luxembourg Findel Airport, Milan Malpensa Airport,Eurotunnel Calais Terminal (Chunnel),  Michelotto shop in Padova, Italy, and finally the Le Mans paddock
  • All said and done, almost 18,000 miles were covered in getting the Krohn Racing Ferrari race car and necessary race parts from the Krohn shop in Houston, Texas to the Le Mans paddock
  • 7.1 tons of freight were sent, which included seven freight boxes, the race car and engine
  • 24 people work for the Krohn Racing team during Le Mans week and air travel had to be arranged for 21 of them, with the furthest origination point being Perth, Australia (over 10,600 miles without layovers). The main Krohn Racing crew arrived in Le Mans on Saturday, June 7
  • All three Krohn drivers arrived into Le Mans on Sunday, June 8. Team owner/driver Tracy W. Krohn arrived directly into Le Mans by private jet from Houston, Texas, USA; Nic Jonsson flew commercial from his home in Atlanta, Georgia USA to Paris and took the TGV train to Le Mans; and Brit Ben Collins drove and went through the Chunnel  from his home in Bristol, England
  • The Ferrari F458 arrived from Michelotto on Sunday, June 8, and finished the preparations. The three drivers and car went to ACO scrutineering on Monday, June 9 at 3:30 p.m.
KROHN RACING LOGISTIC EFFORT – LEMANS 2014
Date Activity
23-May Krohn Racing receives invitation from ACO
27-May Ferrari engine flown from Houston to Michelotto in Italy via Luxembourg
28-May Ferrari race car flown Houston, Texas for Michelotto in Italy via London
29-May Ferrari engine arrive at Michelotto in Padova, Italy
30-May Krohn Racing spare parts and equipment driven to Chicago
31-May Ferrari race car arrives at Michelotto in Padova, Italy
1-Jun Krohn Racing spare parts and equipment put on plane to London Heathrow Airport
Road  journey begins for equipment and spares from London to Le Mans, France
2-Jun Three Krohn Racing crew fly to Milan, Italy and drive to Michelotto shop in Padova
2-6 Jun Crew work with Michelotto on car prep and installation of engine and 2014 aero bodywork
6-8 Jun Krohn Racing crew arrives in Le Mans
8-Jun Krohn Ferrari arrives in Le Mans
All 3 Krohn drivers arrive in Le Mans
9-Jun ACO Scrutineering at 3:30 p.m.
Post-Race:

  • Krohn Racing plans to spend the three days after the 24 Hours of Le Mans race in their Garage no. 3 at the track to work on the Ferrari, preparing it for the next IMSA TUDOR Series race at the 6 Hours of Watkins Glen, June 27-29. The Ferrari race car, crew and all equipment will then depart Le Mans on Thursday, June 19, with the crew returning home and the car and the equipment being sent via London to JFK Airport in New York, from where it will be transported to Watkins Glen.
  • The Krohn transporter will depart Houston, Texas on Monday, June 23 to drive to Watkins Glen, New York. The crew will fly out on Tuesday, June 24 to Watkins Glen.
  • Simultaneously on Tuesday, June 24 Tracy Krohn, Nic Jonsson, Race Engineer Hayden Burvill and Team Manager Gary Holland will converge at Magny Cours in central France for a P2 test.

Vettel ‘expected a bit more’ than fourth in Hungary

BUDAPEST, HUNGARY - JULY 24:  Sebastian Vettel of Germany driving the (5) Scuderia Ferrari SF16-H Ferrari 059/5 turbo (Shell GP) on track during the Formula One Grand Prix of Hungary at Hungaroring on July 24, 2016 in Budapest, Hungary.  (Photo by Charles Coates/Getty Images)
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Sebastian Vettel says Ferrari “expected a bit more” than fourth place in Sunday’s Hungarian Grand Prix as Red Bull moved to within a point of the Italian marque in the Formula 1 constructors’ championship.

Vettel claimed his second race win for Ferrari in Hungary last year, but was left to settle for P4 this time around after failing to pass Red Bull’s Daniel Ricciardo for third in the closing stages.

The result extended Ferrari’s winless run in 2016, and allowed Red Bull to pull up just a point behind in the constructors’ championship.

When asked by NBCSN if Ferrari now how to admit it was in a battle for second, Vettel said: “We never denied it! We have to fight Red Bull.

“Our target is always to fight for P1 but Mercedes is strong. It’s not big news. We try everything. So is Red Bull.

“I think we had a good package today. We expected a bit more. But we’re up against it trying to improve it. We have the best pace right behind it.

“We need to get better Saturdays to have a chance on Sundays.”

Vettel was left fuming over the radio on multiple occasions during the race on Sunday after getting stuck behind lapped cars, calling for blue flags to be respected.

“I calmed down. I don’t think they showed the bit where I said please wave a blue flag,” Vettel said after a couple of his messages were broadcast, albeit censored.

“Obviously you get the impression you lose more than others. Lapped cars are usually doing a good job.

“Mirrors aren’t that big. It’s not like a 75 inch 4K resolution mirror you’re looking into. And we’re quite a bit faster in three to four corners.

“I know that I got pretty loud in the car but I’m not going to criticize anyone.”

Gutierrez calls Hamilton ‘disrespectful’ after in-race gesture

BUDAPEST, HUNGARY - JULY 23:  Esteban Gutierrez of Mexico driving the (21) Haas F1 Team Haas-Ferrari VF-16 Ferrari 059/5 turbo on track during final practice for the Formula One Grand Prix of Hungary at Hungaroring on July 23, 2016 in Budapest, Hungary.  (Photo by Mark Thompson/Getty Images)
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Esteban Gutierrez has called three-time Formula 1 world champion Lewis Hamilton  “disrespectful” after being shown the middle finger during Sunday’s Hungarian Grand Prix.

Towards the end of the race at the Hungaroring, leader Hamilton got stuck behind Gutierrez while trying to lap the Haas driver in the final sector.

Hamilton’s lead over Mercedes teammate Nico Rosberg dropped by two seconds, with Hamilton only managing to pass Gutierrez down the start/finish straight.

While passing, Hamilton raised his hand and showed Gutierrez his middle finger, angered by the incident.

Hamilton managed to retain his lead and win the race, while Gutierrez was handed a five-second time penalty for ignoring blue flags that dropped him to 13th in the final classification.

Hamilton batted away a question about the incident after the race, but Gutierrez took to Twitter to express his thoughts.

Ricciardo feels “really satisifed” in happy return to podium

during the Formula One Grand Prix of Hungary at Hungaroring on July 24, 2016 in Budapest, Hungary.
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Daniel Ricciardo’s first podium of the year at the Monaco Grand Prix was soaked in disappointment, with a sure win going away thanks to a botched pit stop and a hard luck second place.

His second podium of the year, at a similar short track that suits both the Red Bull RB12 chassis and the likable Australian, brought the return of the smiling Daniel we all know and love in Sunday’s Hungarian Grand Prix.

Ricciardo was the only driver to even make a remote crack at the Mercedes teammates at Turn 1, launching strongly from third place on the grid into an attempt at the lead around the outside of the corner.

Problem was, Lewis Hamilton got out ahead in the lead and then Nico Rosberg made it back past Ricciardo for second into Turn 2.

Third was always going to be the best case scenario from there for Ricciardo, and he held off Sebastian Vettel’s late-race charge to the finish en route to third place.

“It’s great to have another podium this year. First one was bittersweet but this one I can definitely enjoy,” Ricciardo said on the podium.

“I’m super happy to be here today. Three years in a row at this circuit. Thanks to the team. We’re continually getting better, and I’m having fun.”

Ricciardo’s third place is his second third place at the circuit after coming third last year, and then winning in 2014.

His result, plus the fifth place achieved by Max Verstappen after his battle with Kimi Raikkonen, has put Red Bull within one point of Ferrari for second place in the Constructor’s Championship (224-223).

Ricciardo expanded on it in a separate post-race interview with NBCSN’s Will Buxton.

“I’m so happy to be back up here. It’s been a while since I’ve left Sunday feeling really satisfied,” he said. “Podium is the icing on the cake but all weekend I got the maximum out of the car. For that, I’m pleased.

“At the time we looked quite competitive. But in the end they were quite quicker. They sucked us into that, but I held Seb behind. Anyway I enjoyed it and it was quite fun to cross the line and knowing I’m back on the podium.

“From my side it was nice to be first out of Red Bull and Ferrari. I felt I did my job. Hopefully this means second in Constructor’s later in the year.”

Raikkonen: ‘Very questionable’ not to penalize Verstappen

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Kimi Raikkonen believes it was “very questionable” of the Formula 1 stewards not to penalize Max Verstappen following their clash during Sunday’s Hungarian Grand Prix.

Raikkonen lost part of his front wing while trying to pass Verstappen for fifth place late on, the pair making contact at Turn 2.

Raikkonen fumed over his radio to Ferrari after the incident, claiming that Verstappen moved more than once while trying to defend his position.

Both drivers were able to continue, their scrap lasting to the line where Verstappen finished 0.3 seconds clear.

Speaking to NBCSN after the race, Raikkonen questioned the decision not to penalize the Dutchman.

“I think it was very questionable, but it’s not my decision to decide,” Raikkonen said.

“I’ve seen penalties for much less. It depends on the stewards.

“In the end it didn’t damage our race, but it’s more disappointing to have such a good car and not be in a better position since we started so far back.”

Verstappen had been in the battle for the podium early on, but his race was compromised when he emerged from the pits behind Raikkonen, who was running a reverse strategy after starting down in 14th place.

“It was very frustrating,” Verstappen told NBCSN after fading from the podium fight.

“We were quick but then I got stuck. Ferrari was catching me… then you get stuck behind Kimi, destroy your tires, and do your own races, and the guy behind you catches up on fresher tires.”

Of Raikkonen’s penalty claim, Verstappen simply replied: “It’s his opinion. I tried to defend my position.”