Two drivers for ProSpeed Porsche of Bleekemolen, MacNeil

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WeatherTech Racing will run in the GT Pro category for the start of today’s 24 Hours of Le Mans.  Cooper MacNeil and Jeroen Bleekemolen are up for the challenge of driving the No. 79 WeatherTech Racing Porsche RSR prepared by ProSpeed Competition for the full 24 starting at 3 p.m.local time this afternoon.

As a result of the team’s original third driver Bret Curtis (Lake Sherwood, Calif.) not being able to continue as a result of his accident on Thursday, the team searched for a replacement Bronze classified driver, but could not get one approved in time for the start of the race. Cooper MacNeil (Hinsdale, Ill.) and Jeroen Bleekemolen (Monte Carlo), together with the team, made the decision to run the race with just two drivers.  As a result of not having a Bronze driver in the car, the No. 79 WeatherTech Racing Porsche will now run Le Mans as a Pro car.

“We found out only 10-minutes before the warm-up that our proposed Bronze driver did not get approved,” MacNeil said. “So Jeroen and I, together with the team, decided that we will run the race with just two drivers. The Pro Class has eight cars, we will be the ninth. Maybe a couple of cars will have trouble and we can get a top five or even maybe sneak up on the podium.

“We have no real pressure on us. We don’t have to push the car 110% as we don’t have the speed to match the pace of the factory cars. We plan to turn laps, take care of the car and get it to the finish line and see where we end up. The team did a great job to get the car together and we are motivated to perform for them. I am excited about the prospect of running the race with just Jeroen for 24 hours. We are looking at triple stints for Jeroen and doubles for me.”

Bleekemolen is up to the challenge of running just two drivers.

“This will be a first for me,” Bleekemolen said. “The most hours I’ve had at Le Mans is 10 hours of driving. This weekend I will have to run the maximum of 14 hours and Cooper 10. You cannot run more than four hours in a six hour period, so we each have to do our part.

“As a driver I am excited at the prospect of just running two guys. I will be saving as much energy as possible leading up to the race.  We will be working with our physio team and be prepared as possible. There is no real pressure on us. If the car runs trouble free and some of the other Pro cars have problems we may get a top five result.”

Social roundup: Racing world largely outraged by Verstappen penalty

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The discussion over Max Verstappen’s post-race five-second time penalty assessed in Sunday’s United States Grand Prix, issued when he tried to the inside of Kimi Raikkonen at the Turns 16, 17 and 18 carousel complex at Circuit of The Americas, will roll on far beyond today.

The debate today largely centered over consistency in adjudication and application of the rules, track limits themselves (always a sore subject at COTA given its wide runoff areas) or whether there should be permanent stewards.

In the immediate aftermath, though, Twitter lit up with outrage over Verstappen being assessed a five-second post-race time penalty.

Here’s a mere sampling of the reaction, below.