Le Mans: The Americans’ 24 hours recapped

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Quick recap of all the American drivers, teams or related-entries at this year’s 24 Hours of Le Mans:


No American drivers or teams. So, that was easy.


  • Caterham Racing: The No. 42 Zytek Z11SN Nissan that featured Americans Chris Dyson and Matt McMurry, the 16-year-old, ended 10th in LMP2 and 23rd overall. The car had a couple spins over the week but nothing major; McMurry drove early and promisingly through the rain-drenched second and third hours, and also brought the car home to the checkered flag. He’s the youngest to start, and now youngest to finish, at Circuit de la Sarthe.
  • Larbre Competition: The No. 50 Morgan Judd was down on outright pace all week and ended with 341 laps completed, not classified by the end of the race. Still, Ricky Taylor ran the car’s best lap time of 3:43.386 and was often close to brother Jordan on the overall scoreboard; at one point, the two cars, separated by class, were only two positions apart.
  • *Note: the OAK Racing Team Asia car had David Cheng, American by birth/nationality but part of the all-Chinese driver branded lineup in the No. 33 Ligier JS P2 Nissan. That car, which Cheng co-drove with Adderly Fong and Ho-Pin Tung, ended seventh in LMP2.


  • Corvette Racing: Corvette’s No. 73 made it to the podium in second place and had class victory hopes with Jan Magnussen, Antonio Garcia and Jordan Taylor. But the sister No. 74 Oliver Gavin, Tommy Milner and Richard Westbrook placed fourth in class after losing eight laps due to a slipped alternator belt and gearbox leak.
  • ProSpeed Competition: This wasn’t supposed to be a Pro class entry but following Bret Curtis’ accident, the No. 79 Porsche 911 GT3 RSR, one of the oldest chassis in the field, ran with just two drivers in Jeroen Bleekemolen and Cooper MacNeil. The pair took the backup chassis (brought in to replace the broken car) to fifth in GTE-Pro after a flawless, trouble-free drive as “iron men” in the WeatherTech-backed entry.


  • 8Star Motorsports: Despite a couple flat tires and spins along the way over the course of the week, the bright orange No. 90 Ferrari F458 Italia that featured late American call-up Frankie Montecalvo ended best American entry in class, P4 in GTE-Am.
  • Dempsey Racing-Proton: The lone all-American driver lineup of Patricks Long and Dempsey, with Joe Foster, had a three-minute stop-and-hold for spinning the tires leaving the pits overnight. They ended fifth in GTE-Am with the No. 77 Porsche 911 RSR, but threatened the top three all race.
  • JMW Motorsport: The No. 66 Ferrari F458 Italia that featured Flying Lizard American drivers Spencer Pumpelly and Seth Neiman struggled on outright pace but ran consistently to seventh in class.
  • Krohn Racing: Tracy Krohn’s team made it to Le Mans, and ended 10th in class in the classic “Krohn Green” No. 57 Ferrari F458 Italia.
  • Ram Racing: South African-born but U.S.-based Mark Patterson was part of the driving lineup in the No. 53 Ferrari F458 Italia that ended 12th in class.
  • AF Corse: Howard Blank (No. 62) was in an Ferrari F458 Italia that finished, but completed only 295 laps; Peter Ashley Mann (No. 60) was in a car that failed to finish.

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NHRA: Alexis DeJoria brings free mammograms to Texas, Las Vegas races

DeJoria pink race car for breast cancer awareness month
(Photo courtesy Alexis DeJoria Racing)
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Some drivers see red when they’re behind the wheel of a 300-mph Funny Car.

But NHRA Funny Car driver Alexis DeJoria is seeing pink in the month of October – and she’s proud of it.

DeJoria, who owns Alexis DeJoria Racing and drives the Tequila Patron Toyota for Kalitta Racing, is using the color pink to call attention to breast cancer awareness month in October.

DeJoria has partnered with Baylor Healthcare Systems to offer free mammograms to race fans attending this weekend’s AAA Fall Nationals at Texas Motorplex (Friday and Saturday) in Ennis, Texas.

She’ll reprise that role, partnering with Nevada Health Centers for the Toyota Nationals at The Strip in Las Vegas Oct. 30-31.

According to a media release, ‘”Mammovans’ (mobile mammography units) will be parked in the nitro pits of the racetracks, and free mammograms will be available on-site during both weekends to female ticketholders over the age of 40, regardless of whether or not they have health insurance.”

Those who seek to be screened do not need an appointment or referral. If you have health insurance, bring your insurance information to the race. Test results will be sent via mail approximately ten days after the event.

This year’s initiative continues a program DeJoria began three years ago when she launched the “Free Mammograms for the Fans” program.

Also, DeJoria will drive a hot pink race car in both events.

“I really want to thank the Patrón Spirits Company and Toyota for their support, as well as Kalitta Motorsports, everyone who bought items on our eBay fundraising page, purchased our pink Fight Like a Girl bracelets and made donations,” said DeJoria. “It all goes toward this very wonderful life-saving cause and we would not be able to provide this service to our fans without their support.”

Added Ed Laukes, vice president of marketing, performance and guest experience for Toyota Motor Sales USA, “If we are able to save the life of so much as one mother, daughter, sister, wife or friend, it will be well worth our additional investment in our partners at DeJoria (Alexis DeJoria Racing). It truly is rewarding to be able to assist one of our race teams on a program that is so meaningful to so many people.”

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Sir Stirling Moss: Enclosed cockpits in open-wheel racing ‘ridiculous’

Sir Stirling Moss Getty
(Getty Images)
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While IndyCar mulls some type of enclosed cockpits or canopies in their race cars as early as 2017 to enhance driver safety, one racing legend scoffs at the notion that open-wheel racing should go down that path.

“I think it’s ridiculous,” Sir Stirling Moss told Road and Track at the recent Lime Rock Historic Festival. “Motor racing is dangerous. And one does it – some of us do it – because it is dangerous. I was one of those. And I think to go and put forward things like that is absolutely ridiculous. Absolutely ridiculous.”

MORE: IndyCar CEO: No safety changes for 2016 car, despite Wilson death

It’s the opinion of the 85-year-old Moss that safety elements in one form of open-wheel racing – namely, Formula 1 – are as good as they can be at the moment.

“I think quite honestly, most events have good flag marshaling, which is very important,” Moss said. “The drivers know what they can do and they usually stick within their realistic limits.

“But of course, obviously, the sort of racing and etiquette you have on a circuit like this, or, a club circuit, is necessarily pretty different when you start talking Formula One.

“But, I think (danger) is part of the sport. I don’t think anybody wants to get hurt, but they’re all going to push themselves up to their limit, and that’s pretty good.”

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